Who wants to test 14.1 Sequence?

jeagle64

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
And, to make matters worse, you have to call the order of the balls as well. Potting a 14 ball sequence would be truly God Mode!

In practice sequences of 3-6 balls are pretty doable. More becomes risky, for my level.

Oh yea. I forgot that little detail. Maybe half the balls at a time is doable.


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DaWizard

Well-known member
So today we had a tournament and played 14.1 Sequence and it did not stand the test.

It just required too much attention and scorekeeping. I'd love to see how this would work out with 600+ Fargo players and a ref keeping score, but that is a pipe dream.

Valuable testday to draw conclusions 👍
 

kanzzo

hobby player
In a sequence sequential balls cannot be called in the same pocket.
don't like this rule.

for a training game against the ghost I think calling all 14 balls after the break (without the above rule) is a nice challenge. I like the challenge of going 30+ (calling all 14 balls after the break - twice).

To get the sequence right: just use 2 sets of balls and for announcing the sequence exchange the balls for balls of the other set in sequence. Then just pot the balls 1-14 in order
 
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kanzzo

hobby player
What's the ruling, when (incidently) pocketing 2 balls with one shot?

I'd suggest like in rotation games: balls stays down and you continue sequence. Like if you pocket 1 and 3 in 9 ball you just continue with 2-4-5-6-7-8-9
 

kanzzo

hobby player
Here I ran 27 calling all 14 balls directly after the break. Couldn't do alternating pockets in the second rack though. Here I pocketetd 9 and 11 on one shot trying to push 11 in front of the side pocket.


here is the edited version of the first (almost flawless) rack:

 

DaWizard

Well-known member
What's the ruling, when (incidently) pocketing 2 balls with one shot?

I'd suggest like in rotation games: balls stays down and you continue sequence. Like if you pocket 1 and 3 in 9 ball you just continue with 2-4-5-6-7-8-9
On one had I'd like to keep it as close to 14.1 continuous as possible. So this would be a +1 in the sequence.

On the other hand, technically, the sequence was not played as proclaimed. This does raise new questions: can I call 2-in-1 shot? So maybe the first option makes most sense.
 

DaWizard

Well-known member
Here I ran 27 calling all 14 balls directly after the break. Couldn't do alternating pockets in the second rack though. Here I pocketetd 9 and 11 on one shot trying to push 11 in front of the side pocket.


here is the edited version of the first (almost flawless) rack:

Great shooting man!

This demonstraties that at pro level 10+ sequences would be fairly common.
Smart move to replace them all for numbers of the sequence.

In a regular game calling such long sequences is a hassle. For the players to keep track of everything: whats the order? Was this as called?

This game would only work if some kind of digital monitor above the table would keep track of called sequences, the score and ideally project the next called shots on the table.

Anyway, you might be the first person to achieve this! 😃
 

kanzzo

hobby player
In a regular game calling such long sequences is a hassle. For the players to keep track of everything: whats the order? Was this as called?

Exactly. In a "regular" live game I think it's impractical, too slow and boring.

But as a challenge game (something like AZB 14.1 challenge, AZB Ghost challenge or the BU Exams from Dr_Dave I think it could be interesting.

I would limit it to 5 racks (and 5 innings) like in One Pocket Ghost.

So players can record their attempts and just post them online and watching is easier with the "jump forward 5 seconds" function from YouTube. Since it's not really very exciting to watch someone exchange 14 balls in numerical order for 7 minutes but it's good to have it in an unedited video so no cheating is possible.

I think it's a great practice game to develop "seeing" patterns and simple positions and recognizing what balls lead to each other and practice falling on the correct side of the balls. I needed 2 days and about 4 hours to record the above video (with calling and making all 14 balls) and it was a great practice immensly helping my straight pool game.

As mentioned, I don't see any merit though in the rule of needing to alternate pockets all the time. On some layout it's very impractical and won't help your 14.1 patterns (which I think should be the main goal of this practice game).
 

kanzzo

hobby player
My suggestion for the rules of the 5-inning game would be to start every inning with a 14.1 break ball of your choice with ball in hand (like in the Derby City Straight Pool Challenge), and exchanging the balls for another set in numerical order so your pattern is obvious for the viewers after the break. You get 1 point for the first break and 1 point for every ball you pocket that was called in sequence. And if you happen to land on a break ball in a way that you can open the next rack and having balls to continue, you get additional 5 points. So maximum per inning is 20 and maximum possible in the game is 100 points.

If you make all 15 balls but can't open the next rack with your last ball (either by missing the rack or being stuck in the rack with no ball to continue) you get only 15 points. (Easiest way to show, you are able to continue and earned the extra 5 point is to make 2 more balls after the break. These 2 balls don't need to be called in a sequence.)

If you make more balls with one shot (like breaking and 2-3 balls go in or you make 9 and 11 with one shot as in my example), you get these points also.

And depending on your skill level you can set yourself goals to beat in this 5 inning game in your practice session (like getting to 30 / 40 / 50 points).

I needed 30 minutes for 2 racks so 60-90 minutes for the 5 inning game seems reasonable. (Half of the time is needed to come up with a pattern and exchanging the balls in numerical order.)
 
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