Why I Quit After Playing Almost Everyday for 30 Years

brunswick1901

Active member
After I learned to play the game at a decent level, I saw a old guy trying to play pool, it looked like he was just learning the game.

I was shocked when one of the guys said, "He used to be a great player!".

I decided that when I lost the ability to play I would quit, it happened just after I turned 50.
 
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George the Greek

Well-known member
After I learned to play the game at a decent level, I saw a old guy trying to play pool, It looked like he was just learning the game.

I was shocked when one of the guys said, "He used to be a great player!".

I decided that when I lost the ability to play I would quit, it happened just after I turned 50.
I'm 70 and hadn't touched a cue in over 20+ years. I tried recently and it was with horrible results but I'm going to stick with it and see if I can turn it around.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
After I learned to play the game at a decent level, I saw a old guy trying to play pool, It looked like he was just learning the game.

I was shocked when one of the guys said, "He used to be a great player!".

I decided that when I lost the ability to play I would quit, it happened just after I turned 50.
I understand your frustration, but for most of us, the challenge of playing when you are older can be rewarding. Yes, you likely won’t be the same shotmaker you were in your 20s, but there’s no reason you can’t try to make up for it in other ways. Better positioning and better defensive / safety game for example.

I’m not the shotmaker I was when I was younger, but I feel good about how I can still sometimes play at age 67. When seeing how the games of many very good and even pro players have deteriorated at my age or even younger, it makes me feel pretty good about my current game.

If the game gives you no pleasure any more because you compare you current game to how you played in your prime, I guess that’s decision, but unless you’ve been able to replace that passion you had for pool with something else you enjoy as much or more, that’s too bad.
 
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Cornerman

Cue Author...Sometimes
Gold Member
Silver Member
After I learned to play the game at a decent level, I saw a old guy trying to play pool, It looked like he was just learning the game.

I was shocked when one of the guys said, "He used to be a great player!".

I decided that when I lost the ability to play I would quit, it happened just after I turned 50.
I'm a shell of the player I was 15 years ago. It's embarrassing.
 

sbrownn

Registered
After I learned to play the game at a decent level, I saw a old guy trying to play pool, It looked like he was just learning the game.

I was shocked when one of the guys said, "He used to be a great player!".

I decided that when I lost the ability to play I would quit, it happened just after I turned 50.
I'm playing some of the best pool in my life and I just turned 55. The three things that work best for me is a nice forward weighted quality cue (that makes you want to really want to get down on the shot with confidence), getting my chin as close to the cue shaft as possible (really helps my alignment and aim) and staying with standard maple shafts with a soft quality layered tip on my Carmeli setup.
 

Justaneng

Registered
I have a 75 year old on my USAPL team. He was wearing a neck brace for a while. He’s also going through multiple cancer treatments, but he’s still out there playing as a Fargo 500. Apparently was an old local straight pool star back in the day (and I tend to believe him). He basically says he’s playing until the good lord takes him.

He’s a sweet old man right up until he gets to the table - and then from that point forward it’s an endless stream of obscenities.
 

couldnthinkof01

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have a 75 year old on my USAPL team. He was wearing a neck brace for a while. He’s also going through multiple cancer treatments, but he’s still out there playing as a Fargo 500. Apparently was an old local straight pool star back in the day (and I tend to believe him). He basically says he’s playing until the good lord takes him.

He’s a sweet old man right up until he gets to the table - and then from that point forward it’s an endless stream of obscenities.
Makes me want to save my obscenities for later, when I've earned them.
Something to look forward to!
 

muskyed

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm 74 and have been playing again for about 7-8 years. I first played in the bar scene from 1970 - about 1983 then quit for 30 plus years. After taking it back up I was somewhat stagnant in my playing for 4 or 5 years but have now been progressing in ability every year.
Looking at my league average, I was about 10% better last year than the year before, and this year 3-4% better than last year. I feel it is still possible to improve maybe 10% or so but it gets tougher as the years go by.
Shooting two leagues has helped somewhat, but realizing what problems I can reasonably work on has helped more. I try not to dwell on more than a couple things at once in practice. Also, I have other interests and while I could shoot with friends for a couple hours or so, I can only stand to practice by myself a half hr or so at a time.
Sadly, one issue has popped up these last couple years and that is some occasional shaking in both hands. If it starts on pool league night, it's not going to be a good night. You can still somewhat shoot through it, but it really affects softer finesse shooting. I even have it at home now and then and will just walk away and come back in a couple hrs to try again. I actually can tell ahead of times if it's going to be a problem as my fingertips almost feel as there is electric current going through them. Anyway, it's what it is, but if it gets much worse, I may consider at some point quitting, but that's something for down the road as for now I still am improving.
 

sciarco

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I used to be a pretty good player along time ago now at 71 i still enjoy playing in the OPPL Ontario pool players league . I'm not the player i use to be but it gets me out and that's all that matters.
 

BRKNRUN

Showin some A$$
Silver Member
Good news is I was never a top flight player......I am 55 and on vacation until Feb 19........then retired.....I am actually starting to pick up the cue again and "practice" after at least a 5 year layoff....Fargo is currently 607.........My goal is to get to 599 so I can play in all the big events..........My expectation though is 640-650 by the end of the year.

Perhaps I can get as good as Efren and Earl are right now by the time I am 60......;)
 

GoldCrown

Pool players have more balls
Gold Member
Silver Member
I sucked as a young person..sucked a little less at mid life… eat shit at 77 and does not matter at this point. Not quitting or giving up. Too much fun. Why quit. Nobody is laughing at anyone. If people like to play with me that’s all that matters. If I’m holding up the game .. that’s a different story. I played with people that kept forgetting what ball or whose turn it is…
Seriously… I’m still learning. Not stopping playing until I can’t swing the cue or make it to the table…
No such thing as stepping out because I can’t maintain a consistent game. It’s not my livelihood.
 
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dendweller

Well-known member
After I learned to play the game at a decent level, I saw a old guy trying to play pool, it looked like he was just learning the game.

I was shocked when one of the guys said, "He used to be a great player!".

I decided that when I lost the ability to play I would quit, it happened just after I turned 50.
Last year I saw there was a guy playing in the Joss event at TurningStone, did okay far as I know, he was in his 70s.
 

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
After I learned to play the game at a decent level, I saw a old guy trying to play pool, it looked like he was just learning the game.

I was shocked when one of the guys said, "He used to be a great player!".

I decided that when I lost the ability to play I would quit, it happened just after I turned 50.
Dont take this as a personal attack, but I'll be completely blunt...
You are a whiny ass man child.

You are feeling sorry for yourself. So what if you can't play as well as you used to. Nobody will in their upper years. You are taking the game too seriously. Based on personal experience, pool is not all about results. It is the journey that matters. It's about comradship (is that a word).

Have you thought about retaining an instructor? If you look, you might find one that will be able to help you regain some of your prowess. There has to be someone that has experience retraining older players.

You also might find it satisfying to help younger players improve their game. With your experience, you could become a referee. There are many things you could do in this sport.
 
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