526 consecutive balls

fastone371

Certifiable
Silver Member
Source Wiki...

Mosconi set the world record by running 526 consecutive balls without a miss during a straight pool exhibition in Springfield, Ohio on March 19–20, 1954.[11] A handwritten and notarized affidavit[12] with the signatures of more than 35 eyewitnesses exists as proof of this feat. The record has been surpassed, with 626 consecutive balls ran by John Schmidt on May 27, 2019, recorded on a videotape.[13] Critics have argued that Mosconi's record was made in competition while Schmidt simply set up break shots for himself, and that his video was never released.[14][15]

Mosconi’s record was set on a 4 × 8 foot Brunswick table with 5 1/4 inch corner pockets at the East High Billiard Club. Schmidt’s run was on a 4 1/2 by 9 foot table which is more difficult in the sense that longer shots are required but which is easier to play on in the sense that there is more room for the balls to spread, creating unfettered shots. Mosconi competed successfully on 4 1/2 × 9 and even 5 x 10 ft tables.
If I had the option of an 8' table with 5 1/4" pockets or a 9' table with 4 1/2" pockets I'm taking the small table with buckets any day to try and set a high run.
I don't think anyone will top Mosconi's exact record simply because those tables don't really exist anymore.
 

arnaldo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If I had the option of an 8' table with 5 1/4" pockets or a 9' table with 4 1/2" pockets I'm taking the small table with buckets any day to try and set a high run.
I don't think anyone will top Mosconi's exact record simply because those tables don't really exist anymore.
No, actually they really do exist in abundance. There are hundreds of them -- even thousands -- to be readily found in long-established social/fraternal organizations throughout the country . . . Elks, Moose, American Legion, VFWs (Veterans of Foreign Wars). I happily belonged all of them when I lived in the northeast. Much safer and more congenial than beer bars for my tastes, and not least, less than 50 cents a week annualized-basis in dues money for all the pool you wanted to play especially in the less-busy mornings and afternoons. Great for continuous 9-ball and 14.1 experimenting/practicing, and congenial challenge matches. Between us members in any of the fraternal and military organizations we knew every one of the old time pros and shared endless, pool related match stories and personality discussions.

I played in those lodges a couple days a week, gave pool lessons, ran regional and local tournaments in them. Great fun, great folks and plenty of older-model, easy 8-, and 9-footers exactly as referenced above, and always with the "rug" fabrics of bygone days. Solidly USA-constructed brands that are still in regular daily use. Some, but not many, now have Simonis on them and plenty of them of course, still have the wide, easy bucket pockets coupled with quite 14.1-friendly shallow shelves.

Arnaldo
 

logical

apart of their 'semi public'
Silver Member
Hasn't it been more or less accepted that the 526 table was an oversize 8...pro 8...an 8 1/2 footer?

I mean I hate to screw the thread up with facts but they do matter to some.

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mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
No, actually they really do exist in abundance. There are hundreds of them -- even thousands -- to be readily found in long-established social/fraternal organizations throughout the country . . . Elks, Moose, American Legion, VFWs (Veterans of Foreign Wars). I happily belonged all of them when I lived in the northeast. Much safer and more congenial than beer bars for my tastes, and not least, less than 50 cents a week annualized-basis in dues money for all the pool you wanted to play especially in the less-busy mornings and afternoons. Great for continuous 9-ball and 14.1 experimenting/practicing, and congenial challenge matches. Between us members in any of the fraternal and military organizations we knew every one of the old time pros and shared endless, pool related match stories and personality discussions.

I played in those lodges a couple days a week, gave pool lessons, ran regional and local tournaments in them. Great fun, great folks and plenty of older-model, easy 8-, and 9-footers exactly as referenced above, and always with the "rug" fabrics of bygone days. Solidly USA-constructed brands that are still in regular daily use. Some, but not many, now have Simonis on them and plenty of them of course, still have the wide, easy bucket pockets coupled with quite 14.1-friendly shallow shelves.

Arnaldo
This guy is correct- those 8 footers were and still are found in senior centers all over the U.S. - some senior centers have entire billiard rooms with 4 to 6 tables like the one Mosconi played on for the record. I doubt anyone is running 400+ balls on true Diamond 9 foot with pro cut pockets - if they are I would pay to see it! I watched a lot of the JS high practice runs- he hit the cushions many times way before the pocket- true pro- cuts would not accept those hits. I have no problem in someone using larger pockets when going for high 14.1 runs - those larger pockets were where the game was meant to be played -IMO.
 

JimGinPhx

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Willie was a many times World Champion . His resume is unsurpassed . He was so admired and well known that he traveled the country doing well attended exhibitions and challenge matches. He set the 526 mark during a challenge match .
To any ones knowledge did he ever specifically set out to break that mark . If he did set out to break the 526 , playing break shots and running as many as he could , who knows what that number would have been . The reason could be he was too busy earning a living traveling the country doing appearances .
Breaking sports records should be apples to apples not , apples to oranges .
IMHO , Willie running 526 is the standard . If someone is doing an appearance, that includes a challenge match, and get on a roll and surpass 526 then they deserve the accolades .
 

Gear101

Active member
When you think about cue technology, the guy did that with a cue that's maybe not even as nice as your everyday Valley bar cue.
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
Willie was a many times World Champion . His resume is unsurpassed . He was so admired and well known that he traveled the country doing well attended exhibitions and challenge matches. He set the 526 mark during a challenge match .
To any ones knowledge did he ever specifically set out to break that mark . If he did set out to break the 526 , playing break shots and running as many as he could , who knows what that number would have been . The reason could be he was too busy earning a living traveling the country doing appearances .
Breaking sports records should be apples to apples not , apples to oranges .
IMHO , Willie running 526 is the standard . If someone is doing an appearance, that includes a challenge match, and get on a roll and surpass 526 then they deserve the accolades .

Willie tried for the record nearly every night for 30 years. To say his exhibitions were true challenge Matches is beyond a joke. John has the record regardless of Guinness or ripleys.


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greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
Willie tried for the record nearly every night for 30 years. To say his exhibitions were true challenge Matches is beyond a joke. John has the record regardless of Guinness or ripleys.

The ghost of Willie can now rest


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lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Willie tried for the record nearly every night for 30 years. To say his exhibitions were true challenge Matches is beyond a joke. John has the record regardless of Guinness or ripleys.


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We've been over this numerous times and what you are saying is totally incorrect.

Yes, he put on exhibitions for years and would run 100 virtually every time. Or, if he got out with a lesser number, he'd turn to the crowd and ask, "Would you like to see a 100 ball run?" do it, and then launch into his trick shots. By all accounts, he just stopped cold when he got to 100 except for that one night when the crowd urged him on and he ran the 526.

Then it was off to the next room or town for the next exhibition, sometimes the same day. He was there to play a match, put on a show, collect a paycheck, and move on. Willie did not care about high runs. Charlie Ursitti reported that he racked for Mosconi before he played Fats and when he got past 600, with a perfect break shot at hand, Mosconi unscrewed and reputedly said: See, running over 600 is no big deal.

Lou Figueroa
 

logical

apart of their 'semi public'
Silver Member
When you think about cue technology, the guy did that with a cue that's maybe not even as nice as your everyday Valley bar cue.

So now we are saying Mosconi used a crappy cue?

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rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This guy is correct- those 8 footers were and still are found in senior centers all over the U.S. - some senior centers have entire billiard rooms with 4 to 6 tables like the one Mosconi played on for the record. I doubt anyone is running 400+ balls on true Diamond 9 foot with pro cut pockets - if they are I would pay to see it! I watched a lot of the JS high practice runs- he hit the cushions many times way before the pocket- true pro- cuts would not accept those hits. I have no problem in someone using larger pockets when going for high 14.1 runs - those larger pockets were where the game was meant to be played -IMO.
FWIW, I attended a local John Schmidt 14.1 clinic put on by a local billiard supply store. The clinic was held on a Gold Crown I with 4' pockets. John ran 100 on that table with ease; all the while talking to the students explaining his thought process and pattern. He was barely concentrating and he ran 100 on an extremely tight table he had only played on for about an hour beforehand. He also had a tip on his cue he had never played with before: a fresh Tiger Sniper. It was pretty amazing if you ask me.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When you think about cue technology, the guy did that with a cue that's maybe not even as nice as your everyday Valley bar cue.
False. Mosconi ran the 526 with a Rambow and also played with Balabushka's. Hardly house cues. I had the good fortune to hold the cue he ran 526 with as well as many other personal cues of his.

49464248911_b7ed8f2b8e_4k.jpg


49464251526_60a6ebd243_4k.jpg
 

Cornerman

Cue Author...Sometimes
Gold Member
Silver Member
We've been over this numerous times and what you are saying is totally incorrect.

Yes, he put on exhibitions for years and would run 100 virtually every time. Or, if he got out with a lesser number, he'd turn to the crowd and ask, "Would you like to see a 100 ball run?" do it, and then launch into his trick shots. By all accounts, he just stopped cold when he got to 100 except for that one night when the crowd urged him on and he ran the 526.

Then it was off to the next room or town for the next exhibition, sometimes the same day. He was there to play a match, put on a show, collect a paycheck, and move on. Willie did not care about high runs. Charlie Ursitti reported that he racked for Mosconi before he played Fats and when he got past 600, with a perfect break shot at hand, Mosconi unscrewed and reputedly said: See, running over 600 is no big deal.

Lou Figueroa
According to Mike Shamos, Willie went for high runs at some point. In 1953 he had a 322 (Platteville, Wisconsin) and then a 365 (Wilmington, North Carolina). In 1954 was his 526. So it definitely wasn’t just one night in Springfield, OH.
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
False. Mosconi ran the 526 with a Rambow and also played with Balabushka's. Hardly house cues. I had the good fortune to hold the cue he ran 526 with as well as many other personal cues of his.

49464248911_b7ed8f2b8e_4k.jpg


49464251526_60a6ebd243_4k.jpg
You know, even if Mosconi signed something attesting to something you can't nessasaraly believe it. He was not totally honest from my personal experience.
 
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