Best medium tip?

evergruven

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I tried milk duds and I know some people love them, but to me they are too thin. They are less than half the height of a layered tip to start with, and if I shape it to a nice round dome the curve practically reaches the ferrule. At 40/change + cost of the tip, it ends up costing me a lot more over time. Also I have a milk dud on one shaft and a Triangle on another and I honestly can't tell the difference. Triangles last a lot longer so Triangle > milk dud for me.
guessing it depends on who made the 'dud
the dawgdud I had put on was actually pretty fat
I shaped it frequently, until I realized I didn't have to
now I just scuff it lightly before I play, no worries
had it on for some time, it's held its shape well
still plays great, and has life in it yet
 

The_JV

Local_Pro
I suggest whatever hasn't been mentioned yet.... ;)

My only tip purchase that wasn't a hard (whatever), was a Zan soft. It mushroomed slightly as it should after a couple thousand balls, and played/plays great. If I ever decide to give medium a go, based on this experience it would be a Zan.
 

claymont

GET SOME
Gold Member
Silver Member
I tried milk duds and I know some people love them, but to me they are too thin. They are less than half the height of a layered tip to start with, and if I shape it to a nice round dome the curve practically reaches the ferrule. At 40/change + cost of the tip, it ends up costing me a lot more over time. Also I have a milk dud on one shaft and a Triangle on another and I honestly can't tell the difference. Triangles last a lot longer so Triangle > milk dud for me.
Have you thought about learning to change them yourself? It doesn't take a lot skill or materials to do a good job, just some practice.
 

Catalin

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
guessing it depends on who made the 'dud
the dawgdud I had put on was actually pretty fat
I shaped it frequently, until I realized I didn't have to
now I just scuff it lightly before I play, no worries
had it on for some time, it's held its shape well
still plays great, and has life in it yet
That's where I got it from but it's pretty flat.


Sent from my COL-L29 using Tapatalk
 

THam

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Anyone have an opinion on How tips? I know the Ko brothers and SVB use them.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Anyone have an opinion on How tips? I know the Ko brothers and SVB use them.
Someone on here said they play good but mushroom a lot and needed trimming often. I've heard them compared to a Moori. Sounds like just another fish in the sea of tips. Try a Thoroughbred. REALLY good tips at a good price($10).
 

S.Vaskovskyi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Have you thought about learning to change them yourself? It doesn't take a lot skill or materials to do a good job, just some practice.
^^^This.
I"ve learned to change the tip almost at the same time I started to learn the game when I was a 21 y.o. student. It was more than 20 years ago. No one ever touched my shafts but there were always others asking to change a tip for them.
Only now I finally have my lathe when I also have my passion in cue-building...
 

Chili Palmer

323
Gold Member
Silver Member
^^^This.
I"ve learned to change the tip almost at the same time I started to learn the game when I was a 21 y.o. student. It was more than 20 years ago. No one ever touched my shafts but there were always others asking to change a tip for them.
Only now I finally have my lathe when I also have my passion in cue-building...


Agreed. I changed my own tips, as well as others, for years. Oddly, now that I have a cue lathe I've only done 1 or 2 for other people.

It's definitely a money saving task to learn as well as being able to change them whenever you want to try new tips.
 

S.Vaskovskyi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Agreed. I changed my own tips, as well as others, for years. Oddly, now that I have a cue lathe I've only done 1 or 2 for other people.

It's definitely a money saving task to learn as well as being able to change them whenever you want to try new tips.
Back then 20+ years ago when I started in my country it was pretty easy to choose a tip. We had Triangle, Elkmaster and LePro to choose from ... no forum to ask, no youtube to get some knowledge and so on. "Learning by doing" as my teacher Jorgen taught me...
Then the first Moori's appeared which I liked a lot ...
Now there are how many tips out there to choose from?
And here comes me starting to experiment, learn how to do my own milk duds for my own needs as a cue-builder. Being able to make and get what you like is not a bad thing.
When it comes to them being not so tall as most layered tips. It's true ... but what I like about them ... they do not take as much time (if any) to break in as most layered tips and I appreciate being able to get the hardness I want. There is no need to repeat all that was told so many times.
Nothing replaces your own experience but if OP prefers to use somebody else's experience ... it's great. The repair men will have the demand for their services which is good if they have some fun doing it.
I wish OP good luck with those he applies to.
 

evergruven

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
That's where I got it from but it's pretty flat.


Sent from my COL-L29 using Tapatalk

right-
I should amend my statement that the tip was "fat"
what I meant, was to convey that while the tip may have started flat/thin
it's held up well- I've had it on over a year, and the tip's got 6-7 months play on it
I measured an unused dawgdud, it was about 6mm..most of that is still on my cue
and that's after shaping it many times
I might see what you mean tho, that another tip appears "fatter" to start
I'm not sure, but I'd guess due to the process of making a 'dud
their shape and thickness holds up well over time- better than the fat tips? I don't know
 

S.Vaskovskyi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've finished a few cues recently and for one of them I've put a milk dud (fresh ...just finished a dozen experimenting). So here is a close photo with two shafts I built. On a maple one is a black ultraskin medium which is also great for the money (imo). On cf shaft for a kid yesterday I've put a milk dud which came slightly softer than the rest I pressed. As you can see they are fairly close when it comes to the height (on a maple shaft under the black tip there is a black phenolic part of the ferrule).
Yes those hardest duds came out thinner a bit but still should be OK. The main thing ... I'm curious how it plays and feels. I believe I'll like it because I can see and feel certain things while working during the installation (cuts and trims well ... I'm sure it's going to hold it's shape well and the chalk should lay on it great).
We'll see I'm going to test it on Monday or Tuesday (due to quarantine ends here finally).
 

Attachments

  • rps20210123_130139.jpg
    rps20210123_130139.jpg
    95.8 KB · Views: 9
Last edited:
Top