Best way to replace a threaded ferrule?

PariahZero

Member
I’m starting out with cue repair (I’m nowhere near where I’d work on a customer cue), and I’m wondering what the proper/preferred way to replace a threaded ferrule.

• I know a heat gun will soften many adhesives, and then the ferrule can be carefully screwed off.
• I imagine the old ferrule could just be turned down, and a unthreaded replacement glued to the tenon... but that seems less than ideal.

Is there anything else that’s a better idea? Are there videos/books that help explain the process?

I know it’s a good idea to practice on house cues; or even wooden dowels... shafts aren’t exactly cheap.
 
I’m starting out with cue repair (I’m nowhere near where I’d work on a customer cue), and I’m wondering what the proper/preferred way to replace a threaded ferrule.

• I know a heat gun will soften many adhesives, and then the ferrule can be carefully screwed off.
• I imagine the old ferrule could just be turned down, and a unthreaded replacement glued to the tenon... but that seems less than ideal.

Is there anything else that’s a better idea? Are there videos/books that help explain the process?

I know it’s a good idea to practice on house cues; or even wooden dowels... shafts aren’t exactly cheap.
Do u have a lathe? Good videos on youtube.😎
 

PariahZero

Member
Do u have a lathe? Good videos on youtube.

I do have a lathe.

A simple search for “remove pool cue ferrule” results in pages and pages of videos showing how to change the leather tip. Or polish a ferrule.

That’s quite different from removing and/or replacing a threaded ferrule.

The closest thing I’ve seen is a video by Bob Dzuricky showing that he had removed a joint collar that wasn’t perfect. Sadly, it doesn’t actually show the removal process, just the threaded tenon after removing the joint collar.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Depends on what glue was used .
If white glue or wood glue was used, you can just friction heat the ferrule with a leather piece and the glue will give .
Some 5 minute epoxy gives easily too with heat .
If a slow set epoxy was used, you'll have to machine them out with a sharp parting tool or lathe bit .
Then use an ice pick sharp pick to try to take out the material between thread .
If you have a live threader, you can just chase the threads without removing material between threads.
Slow set epoxies also grab that wood really well. They'd stay even after re-threading .

I never liked using a heat gun on ferrules. I've seen it done and it burnt the tenon.
I do not like replacing tenons .
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
In my experiences, using heat to remove the ferrule only works when the ferrule material can withstand the heat and not melt like butter. Pretty much only phenolic, fiber, and the high temp plastics used on most Chinese imports. Most house cues have just pvc or similar plastic material that will melt. Also, if the glue doesn't give way when you twist...it is possible to twist the tenon and have it snap off. I usually just machine them down, then using a pick that has been heated to remove the remaining material and most of the old epoxy/glue. A small triangle shape file then can be used to clean the threads up. Then make a ferrule that will fit the existing tenon/threads.
 

Kim Bye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Seeeing that you often don't know what glue has been used and sometimes your not even sure of the ferrule material or tennon size/construction, it's best to just machine the old tennon off and clean up the threads. That way you wan't have any surprises.
 

whammo57

Kim Walker
Silver Member
too much thinking .......... put the shaft in the lathe........ turn the ferrule off with a single point tool down to the threads........... run a tenon threader on the tenon to clean up the threads..................... face the shoulder .......... glue on a new ferrule

Kim
 

Keith E.

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
too much thinking .......... put the shaft in the lathe........ turn the ferrule off with a single point tool down to the threads........... run a tenon threader on the tenon to clean up the threads..................... face the shoulder .......... glue on a new ferrule

Kim
Are you referring to a compression die or something that actually cuts threads?

Thanks,
Keith
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
too much thinking .......... put the shaft in the lathe........ turn the ferrule off with a single point tool down to the threads........... run a tenon threader on the tenon to clean up the threads..................... face the shoulder .......... glue on a new ferrule

Kim
Don't those 5/16 18 tenon threaders require .285 tenons ? Not true .312?
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
With an unknown ferule setup run your lathe about 1k rpm in reverse and use a thick piece of leather (1/8" or so} held with a pliers that has a round clamp behind the flat jaws. Apply enough pressure to heat the ferule gradually. You quickly find what you are up against. At least half of threaded ones will unscrew leaving a clean threaded tenon behind. If they aren't threaded they will also come loose and slip off. Some won't budge and the ferrule will melt. If this is the case you can always machine it off at that point. Sometimes the ferule will melt and you can get it off while it's warm even though it's melting. I can't see machining as a first step when many and maybe even most times you can remove it much quicker and easier. Just don't grab the ferule hard enough to twist off the tenon with the pliers and leather.
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
Yes that is correct. But the better quality ones work fine. I have used my style tenon threader for for over 25 years.
I got a couple of perfectly good tenons seized in your threader and twisted off before I recycled it. Maybe I didn't read the instructions clearly enough?
 

cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I got a couple of perfectly good tenons seized in your threader and twisted off before I recycled it. Maybe I didn't read the instructions clearly enough?
I have not twisted one off in years. Right size tenon .280 to .285, a little cue wax, half turn back off to break it loose, repeat until fully threaded. Going three or four full turns you are asking for trouble.
 

JC

Coos Cues
Gold Member
I have not twisted one off in years. Right size tenon .280 to .285, a little cue wax, half turn back off to break it loose, repeat until fully threaded. Going three or four full turns you are asking for trouble.
Told you I didn't read the instructions. I did just now though. The ones I twisted off I was trying to chase. Guess it's time to buy another one? :)
 

whammo57

Kim Walker
Silver Member
Don't those 5/16 18 tenon threaders require .285 tenons ? Not true .312?
I turn the tenon to about .280 to .285 and thread it.......... I only thread phenolic ferrules for break cues........... all others are just slip in tubes............... I have done more than 400 and not one failure

Kim
 
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