Bridge Step-Adjust Alignment Method

Colin Colenso

<-- My Kids
Silver Member
This is a method some traditional aimers may find beneficial, particularly if they encounter issues with aligning perfectly through Center Cue Ball (CCB).

Let's start with the example of a center ball shot, no squirt and say firmish follow to reduce the effects of throw changing the OB angle significantly.

If we seek straight CB cueing, then our alignment, via bridge V placement, needs to align the cue, CCB and the target point on the OB. As our tip moves onto the line to the target point, our bridge needs to sweep across such that this line intersects CCB. This can be quite a challenge as we're moving 2 things at once. i.e. The cue line and the bridge.

The Bridge Step-Adjust Alignment method separates this method into the two parts, and narrows in toward the final bridge positioning via 1 or 2 or more steps if one's initial alignment was way out.

First Step:

Place bridge approximately where you think it needs to be. Set it statically in place.

With bridge still, rotate the cue, preferably in a way where eye-cue position remains the same. Keeping the cue against a particular part of one's chest or chin will assist a consistent perspective.

Rotate until the cue tip points to where you think the pot angle is. In this stage, you're not looking at the CB, but imagining a CB that is perfectly aligned with the tip. Feathering the cue may aid in perceiving the line to the OB target point.

When you feel satisfied with the tip direction toward to OB target, hold still with the cue. Without moving bridge or back hand or head, shift your focus to the CB and note where the tip is aligned relative to CCB.

In this attached exaggerated image, my tip is way left of CCB. If there were a CB directly in front of the tip, it would be aligned properly to the OB target.

Second Step:

Parallel shift the cue and bridge to CCB. Technically speaking we'd be rotating about a radius from OB contact point to cue line, but unless the CB and OB are very close, a parallel shift is almost indistinguishable.

I'll attach the first image, then continue with the explanation with further accompanying images.
 

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Colin Colenso

<-- My Kids
Silver Member
If I were to hit this shot where I have aligned it, with left english, the squirt would take the CB even further to the overcut. If I pivot to CCB, I'll also send the CB further right. The red line is the parallel line and the white line is the squirt line.

If I parallel shift my bridge to the right, to CCB, I'll move the cue onto, or nearer to the required target line.

Here's the overhead view.
 

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Colin Colenso

<-- My Kids
Silver Member
After we perform the bridge adjustment step, again hold the bridge still and return to the first step, to check if the bridge shift was performed accurately.

Again rotate the cue tip a little, while focused on the OB target, be it a point, an overlap, or whatever method you use to determine your aim line. Again, feather a little if that helps with perception. When satisfied with the tip pointing direction, again hold that line perfectly still while you shift focus to where the tip is pointing at the CB. You may find a minor adjustment to CCB is still required due to under or over parallel shifting in the first step.

In this diagram, the yellow line represents the parallel alignment shift to CCB and the orange line is the resultant OB travel line to pocket.

I think this method can be particularly educational for some players who have alignment perspective issues / contrasts, when looking down and close versus ahead, which often leads to struggling to perceive alignment through true CCB.

As I cue under one eye, my left eye, when I shift focus to see if I'm aligned to CCB, it helps if I close my right eye, so I get a clearer view of where my cue is pointing relative to CCB. This improves the accuracy of my parallel bridge shift to CCB.

Would appreciate any feedback from those who want to experiment with this step adjustment method.

For those who are thinking this is kind of crazy, keep in mind that when we actually fish for the line during pre-alignment, we're essentially doing the exact same thing, but dynamically, which at times makes it difficult because we're altering two opposing variables at the same time with focus flying back and forth attempting to combine a suitable resonance of variables. By statically separating the two variables, we might aspire to a higher degree of accuracy with each.

Colin
 

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LAMas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks,

"As I cue under one eye, my left eye, when I shift focus to see if I'm aligned to CCB, it helps if I close my right eye, so I get a clearer view of where my cue is pointing relative to CCB. This improves the accuracy of my parallel bridge shift to CCB."
CC

This is what I do but I can't trust that my aiming/dominant eye is directly above my cue.

Be well
 

Colin Colenso

<-- My Kids
Silver Member
Thanks,

"As I cue under one eye, my left eye, when I shift focus to see if I'm aligned to CCB, it helps if I close my right eye, so I get a clearer view of where my cue is pointing relative to CCB. This improves the accuracy of my parallel bridge shift to CCB."
CC

This is what I do but I can't trust that my aiming/dominant eye is directly above my cue.

Be well
When you close one eye, and feather the cue back and forth, you'll be able to see then if your eye is actually over the cue as it will appear to move at an angle if the eye is not on that line.

You can also place a vertical line on a mirror or cover two sides of a mirror, just leaving a 1/2 inch slit as a way to practice getting a dominant eye over the cue.

FWIW: You can use this even if you align between eyes. Point cue, hold, parallel shift bridge to CCB... point cue again, hold, and see if you're aligned to CCB. A few feathers can assist in perceiving the CCB I think. While it can be a challenge, it's easier to move the tip to CCB when focused on the CB than it is to do while focusing multiple feet ahead.

Colin
 

LAMas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
CC,
Slow night.
I often place the tip of the cue at the base of the CB and raise it vertically with the bridge hand like some Pinoys. It is useful to have a spotter look at where the tip is actually pointed when you think that you are CCB, but hitting that point, if correct, is another story - your story.

Thanks and be well.
 

Colin Colenso

<-- My Kids
Silver Member
CC,
Slow night.
I often place the tip of the cue at the base of the CB and raise it vertically with the bridge hand like some Pinoys. It is useful to have a spotter look at where the tip is actually pointed when you think that you are CCB, but hitting that point, if correct, is another story - your story.

Thanks and be well.
Cheers LAMas,

I do the same sometimes, and some other times, hold the tip high to match its convex with the CB convex, but generally, just try to perceive CCB.

I've noticed when the CB is near a rail and shooting at an angle to the rail, I've a tendency to hit on the side of the CB which we see less of, for some reason.

Those little variances in perspectives make it difficult to have full confidence in alignment on all occasions.
 
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