CTE automatically corrects stroke issues

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hello Cowboy.
That fine sniper's rifle FORCES the shooter to solidify their basics...without them even knowing it. Otherwise that fine sniper's rifle will not put the 5 shots into a group the size of a silver dollar. And the person ends up with another fine rifle for sale.
CTE Aiming FORCES a player to solidify the stroke in the same way...otherwise the system does not work as it should. And the person ends up looking for another aiming system or concept.
I can't say that about other methods of aiming since I don't know any. (Other than what I used before learning CTE which was "just see the shot and shoot it".....that route was fraught with peril and didn't work out so hot.)
By the way, who under the age of being an old man knows what a silver dollar is?:cool:
Here's more evidence by Low just in case anyone needs it. I don't, I'm a believer. Now if I can just find the right video.......
 
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CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my hero's
Silver Member
At which point you realize you have been missing due to a bad stroke and not aim. Aiming is pretty easy in comparison.

Again you miss point if you can not hit ball straight, sim do mean shit.

Shooting is great example is 1/8” flinch at muzzle, put you way off point of aim at 500 yards.
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my hero's
Silver Member
Pool is like most sports until you become world class your an amateur.

The world class player, work on game daily. Most of what they do is fast because it is middle memory.

Their brains are like pool knowledge computers.
 

JB Cases

www.jbcases.com
Silver Member
That's what I'm talking about. I have an open mind and really want to straighten out my stroke. Mr Low says it "definitely" straightens a stroke out. He doesn't mention anything about boring drills which is good because I work a lot and really don't have time for that stuff.
If I could just figure out CTE my stroke will straighten out, I'm sure of it. I'm really on the fence about buying the book because if it's anything like the videos I'm afraid I won't understand it. I tried watching more videos but get more confused and bored the more I watch. Can anyone suggest a video that might help? A CTE one I mean. According to everyone all the other aiming systems require boring drills to fix your stroke before they'll work and I'm just not in the mood for that. Is it hopeless?
Someone must know of a video where Stan does something other than shoot 15 degree cut shots from a foot away from the pocket while exclaiming over and over how awesome the system performs. I can already do that even if twisting my wrist.
Someone, anyone.......
Probably hopeless. I can tell you that using CTE improperly leads to magnification of stroke issues and using it properly allows me to stroke straight.

If a person does not have time to learn to use CTE properly to get into the shot then it is likely that the stroke will not be "straightened" because the shot line will not be correct and the subconscious will come into play trying to get the cue to strike the cueball on the vector needed.

I don't know how watching Stan shoot "tougher" shots will help you to stroke better. I can tell you that learning to aim correctly will increase your margin of error due to giving you a little more on each side of center pocket so that small errors in stroke will still allow you to pocket more shots.

I personally DO NOT BELIEVE that CTE "straightens" a bad stroke. I think that it can straighten small stroke errors. That said I will also say that vision plays a part and for me I have recently had surgery and my vision is super sharp now and the lack of "fuzziness" as I look at the cb and ob seems to be helping me to stroke straighter.


At which point you realize you have been missing due to a bad stroke and not aim. Aiming is pretty easy in comparison.
I have an experiment that indicates pretty clearly to me that aiming in pool is not easy in comparison. As I have stated before a blind person can be taught to have a perfectly straight stroke and be unable to aim. I think that the variables present play a role in making aiming not an "easy" task in pool. I think that we can do a lot more exploration in the concept of how the eyes can lead the body into bad alignment and how various aiming techniques either help or hinder this exercise.

I plan to redo this experiment in about a month with people from non-players to advanced players. I am interested in seeing the results.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have an experiment that indicates pretty clearly to me that aiming in pool is not easy in comparison. As I have stated before a blind person can be taught to have a perfectly straight stroke and be unable to aim. I think that the variables present play a role in making aiming not an "easy" task in pool. I think that we can do a lot more exploration in the concept of how the eyes can lead the body into bad alignment and how various aiming techniques either help or hinder this exercise.

I plan to redo this experiment in about a month with people from non-players to advanced players. I am interested in seeing the results.
If you did a poll on AZ such as "What is more difficult - having a straight stroke without errors or aiming?" I think aiming is going to come out the loser.
 

JB Cases

www.jbcases.com
Silver Member
If you did a poll on AZ such as "What is more difficult - having a straight stroke without errors or aiming?" I think aiming is going to come out the loser.
And? A poll doesn't indicate that the people polled are correct about a fact. Look up the poll on banning DHMO. I am not saying that it IS a fact that aiming is harder than stroking. I am saying that it is my opinion that aiming is harder than you give it credit for for a variety of factors.

For example, someone who is diabetic has less visual acuity when they have high blood sugar. https://www.allaboutvision.com/askdoc/diabetes.htm
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
And? A poll doesn't indicate that the people polled are correct about a fact. Look up the poll on banning DHMO. I am not saying that it IS a fact that aiming is harder than stroking. I am saying that it is my opinion that aiming is harder than you give it credit for for a variety of factors.

For example, someone who is diabetic has less visual acuity when they have high blood sugar. https://www.allaboutvision.com/askdoc/diabetes.htm
I would say the population of AZ is fully qualified to make a good estimate of the relative difficulty. Your opinion is just that as is mine. For you aiming might be hard but for me I was pushing balls around a table when I was barely tall enough to see it. Maybe there's something to that, I don't know. In general it is my belief that educated pool players know that aiming isn't nearly as difficult as the stroke.
 

JB Cases

www.jbcases.com
Silver Member
I would say the population of AZ is fully qualified to make a good estimate of the relative difficulty. Your opinion is just that as is mine. For you aiming might be hard but for me I was pushing balls around a table when I was barely tall enough to see it. Maybe there's something to that, I don't know. In general it is my belief that educated pool players know that aiming isn't nearly as difficult as the stroke.
I understand your belief. Your belief is not fact. You don't know the facts on this and neither do I because we have not studied this in depth and it is highly unlikely that anyone in pool ever will. There are many beliefs about how things work that have been proven untrue over time. Aiming is not as easy for you as you think in my opinion but you are viewing it through your own experience and are happy with the results you get despite them not being the world class pinnacle of performance. The standard paradigm is that aiming is a byproduct of fundamentals but after all the time I have spent on this subject I don't agree. For me in order to know that aiming is "easy" or "hard" or better said what consistency level I have is to test it. Without that all I have is my own opinion of my aiming acuity without any hard data to back it up. I have no benchmark to base my knowledge on.

Let's take the "mother drill" espoused about by Randy. Imagine you taught someone to stroke perfectly. They could shoot a stop shot from any distance and stop dead every time. But they never practiced that drill or any cut shots. In other words they learned to aim center to center with incredible accuracy.

Then you take another person and teach them to stroke fairly decently but you teach them some aiming system, ghost ball or whatever until you are confident that they can actually get on the shot line consistently.

Which of these two players is likely to score better on the mother drill if neither of them have ever seen or tried it previously?

I completely agree that a person can achieve a decent level, even a pro level with serious brute force effort. Trial and Error hones skill in those who are dedicated to improvement. I just think that in the modern era we have better tools and techniques than just brute force table time.

I don't know how dedicated you have been to improving your skill level but you were fortunate to be able to have been able to play since you were a child. Were you as good as Mosconi was at 10 years old? If not why not? I submit that if you were not it is due to several factors in your life that were different than his life. If both of you started at 7 and both of you are 50 and he is a world champion and you are an above average league player then starting at 7 doesn't mean that you have all the pool knowledge and physical skill needed to beat champions. This is not a knock it is merely an illustration that one's own experience isn't the standard by which anything is judged by society or science.

If I were the only one saying that CTE is fantastic then absolutely decry me as a delusional fanatic. However there are others who also started at very young ages who think that CTE is fantastic and whom have a similar level of skill as you do at a similar age. All I am saying is that we can look deeper now into cause and effect than we ever could before and we should. And if we find through adequate testing that aiming is harder than thought and that some methods can indeed make it much easier to be consistently accurate then we should embrace and develop those methods.
 

JB Cases

www.jbcases.com
Silver Member
I saw your message. By now you should know when I'm just playing around. See Post#15.
I thank you for the opportunity to inject more information about CTE. I figured you were sarcastically knocking it but as long as folks want to make threads knocking CTE I will take the opportunity to defend it.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I understand your belief. Your belief is not fact. You don't know the facts on this and neither do I because we have not studied this in depth and it is highly unlikely that anyone in pool ever will. There are many beliefs about how things work that have been proven untrue over time. Aiming is not as easy for you as you think in my opinion but you are viewing it through your own experience and are happy with the results you get despite them not being the world class pinnacle of performance. The standard paradigm is that aiming is a byproduct of fundamentals but after all the time I have spent on this subject I don't agree. For me in order to know that aiming is "easy" or "hard" or better said what consistency level I have is to test it. Without that all I have is my own opinion of my aiming acuity without any hard data to back it up. I have no benchmark to base my knowledge on.

Let's take the "mother drill" espoused about by Randy. Imagine you taught someone to stroke perfectly. They could shoot a stop shot from any distance and stop dead every time. But they never practiced that drill or any cut shots. In other words they learned to aim center to center with incredible accuracy.

Then you take another person and teach them to stroke fairly decently but you teach them some aiming system, ghost ball or whatever until you are confident that they can actually get on the shot line consistently.

Which of these two players is likely to score better on the mother drill if neither of them have ever seen or tried it previously?

I completely agree that a person can achieve a decent level, even a pro level with serious brute force effort. Trial and Error hones skill in those who are dedicated to improvement. I just think that in the modern era we have better tools and techniques than just brute force table time.

I don't know how dedicated you have been to improving your skill level but you were fortunate to be able to have been able to play since you were a child. Were you as good as Mosconi was at 10 years old? If not why not? I submit that if you were not it is due to several factors in your life that were different than his life. If both of you started at 7 and both of you are 50 and he is a world champion and you are an above average league player then starting at 7 doesn't mean that you have all the pool knowledge and physical skill needed to beat champions. This is not a knock it is merely an illustration that one's own experience isn't the standard by which anything is judged by society or science.

If I were the only one saying that CTE is fantastic then absolutely decry me as a delusional fanatic. However there are others who also started at very young ages who think that CTE is fantastic and whom have a similar level of skill as you do at a similar age. All I am saying is that we can look deeper now into cause and effect than we ever could before and we should. And if we find through adequate testing that aiming is harder than thought and that some methods can indeed make it much easier to be consistently accurate then we should embrace and develop those methods.
I actually agree with much of this. I just had the thought that maybe people who are around a pool table since a young age find certain things, maybe aiming, easier than someone who takes it up as an adult. Don't get me wrong, though, I was not any kind of a player at a young age. I honestly couldn't tell you when I learned to pocket balls. I definitely wasn't a frequent player. I do recall playing at the student union freshman year in college and I was at a level where I was playing cb position but it was an effort to do so. I'd characterize myself as a decent shot maker with an OK stroke but still not much of a player. I'd say I was a banger but I knew enough not to bang the balls. :) Pool clearly wasn't my life.
 

Low500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I actually agree with much of this. I just had the thought that maybe people who are around a pool table since a young age find certain things, maybe aiming, easier than someone who takes it up as an adult. Don't get me wrong, though, I was not any kind of a player at a young age. I honestly couldn't tell you when I learned to pocket balls. I definitely wasn't a frequent player. I do recall playing at the student union freshman year in college and I was at a level where I was playing cb position but it was an effort to do so. I'd characterize myself as a decent shot maker with an OK stroke but still not much of a player. I'd say I was a banger but I knew enough not to bang the balls. :) Pool clearly wasn't my life.
Maybe pool clearly wasn't your life back then, but did you ever imagine a POOL FORUM would be your life and consume it daily for 10-15 years as you argued and attacked an AIMING SYSTEM as well as all of those who use it effectively?

Not only that but doing it in a losing battle after it's hit the market and the world of pool with thousands of pool players including pros using, touting, and teaching it worldwide. What would the correct diagnosis be, by psychiatrists, for such an incredible obsession and waste of time?

But battle on my man, battle on. You're having no effect on the world of pool itself, while you keep going deeper and deeper down into a mental abyss....accompanied by a few others. A mental abyss that has taken over your lives, sending you to absolutely nowhere.
Pretty funny and fitting, I guess.

C'mon now, answer back and do what you do best as if it matters. Adios.
 
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8pack

They call me 2 county !
Silver Member
Why do people aim bad? Because they go to AZ billiards for advice. And when the truth is told they still drink the kool aid.
 

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Probably hopeless. I can tell you that using CTE improperly leads to magnification of stroke issues and using it properly allows me to stroke straight.

If a person does not have time to learn to use CTE properly to get into the shot then it is likely that the stroke will not be "straightened" because the shot line will not be correct and the subconscious will come into play trying to get the cue to strike the cueball on the vector needed.
Seems like an admission that the subconscious recognizes when one is aiming incorrectly. Apparently that's only true for non CTE users? If you aim with CTE then your subconscious keeps quiet and no tweaking ever occurs?
I don't know how watching Stan shoot "tougher" shots will help you to stroke better. I can tell you that learning to aim correctly will increase your margin of error due to giving you a little more on each side of center pocket so that small errors in stroke will still allow you to pocket more shots.
When people are concerned with aiming it's rarely on the hangers he shoots in his videos. It's usually the tougher shots that cause problems. He might get more believers if he was whacking in long tough shots in the videos. Wonder why he doesn't. Could it be that he'd be missing a lot of them? I seem to recall a video by you shooting medium tough shots and missing over and over. Oh I'm sorry, that must have been back when your vision was fuzzy. Maybe make a new video now that yours eyes are good.
I personally DO NOT BELIEVE that CTE "straightens" a bad stroke. I think that it can straighten small stroke errors. That said I will also say that vision plays a part and for me I have recently had surgery and my vision is super sharp now and the lack of "fuzziness" as I look at the cb and ob seems to be helping me to stroke straighter.



I have an experiment that indicates pretty clearly to me that aiming in pool is not easy in comparison. As I have stated before a blind person can be taught to have a perfectly straight stroke and be unable to aim. I think that the variables present play a role in making aiming not an "easy" task in pool. I think that we can do a lot more exploration in the concept of how the eyes can lead the body into bad alignment and how various aiming techniques either help or hinder this exercise.

I plan to redo this experiment in about a month with people from non-players to advanced players. I am interested in seeing the results.
 

lfigueroa

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Maybe pool clearly wasn't your life back then, but did you ever imagine a POOL FORUM would be your life and consume it daily for 10-15 years as you argued and attacked an AIMING SYSTEM as well as all of those who use it effectively?

Not only that but doing it in a losing battle after it's hit the market and the world of pool with thousands of pool players including pros using, touting, and teaching it worldwide. What would the correct diagnosis be, by psychiatrists, for such an incredible obsession and waste of time?

But battle on my man, battle on. You're having no effect on the world of pool itself, while you keep going deeper and deeper down into a mental abyss....accompanied by a few others. A mental abyss that has taken over your lives, sending you to absolutely nowhere.
Pretty funny and fitting, I guess.

C'mon now, answer back and do what you do best as if it matters. Adios.

I doubt anyone is consumed with anything.

I probably spend 15 minutes or so each day, often over a cappacino, checking out various pool forums. Within that time it's easy to play some Whack-A-Mole.

Lou Figueroa
 
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