CTE automatically corrects stroke issues

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Apparently this is another benefit of CTE. If you don't hit the CB properly the system doesn't work.
I was wondering--seeing as I'm having a hard time figuring out CTE--does anyone know of a different aiming system that also corrects stroke issues.
I have a bad habit of twisting my wrist on some shots so one that corrects that would be helpful.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I suggest minimizing the wrist influence to the cue .
Let the cue slide forward . Hold the cue more loosely .

That is if you cannot correct your twisting wrist .
No aiming system should compensate for that . And nothing will.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... --does anyone know of a different aiming system that also corrects stroke issues.
I have a bad habit of twisting my wrist on some shots so one that corrects that would be helpful.
To the extent that you are implementing any accurate system properly, it will force you to have the cue on the right line when the tip hits the ball because otherwise you will keep missing. One such system is the corrected ghost ball.

But just putting the ball in the pocket doesn't mean you have fixed your stroke. There are lots of good players with poor strokes who pocket balls well.
 

Low500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Apparently this is another benefit of CTE. If you don't hit the CB properly the system doesn't work.
I was wondering--seeing as I'm having a hard time figuring out CTE--does anyone know of a different aiming system that also corrects stroke issues.
I have a bad habit of twisting my wrist on some shots so one that corrects that would be helpful.
It is true that CTE will FORCE the player into dealing with stroke 'whackiness' simply because the system will not work under those conditions. (My personal opinion is that NO aiming system (playing method) will be very successful with a fouled up stroke.)
Therefore the player MUST utilize some of the many stroke correction drills available all over the web and eliminate those troubles. If he doesn't, he will swear to high heaven that it's the "system's fault".
Stroke correction drills are not fun. They require dull boring repetition over and over and over.
In my opinion, Bert Kinister has one of the best drills and that is his Shot #1 in his "run out nine ball" videos. (Niles Fajein, was one of his students...(I probably spelled Niles' last name wrong, but you know who I mean). To quote Bert....."It will build a stroke where there is no stroke".
Shoot that shot 100-200 times a day every single day and in 30 days your twisting of the wrist should disappear.
THEN you can proceed with your chosen Aiming System....(I think CTE is the best out there FOR ME...that is.) The final decision on that will have to be yours though, not mine.
Good wishes to you.
(y)(y)
 

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It is true that CTE will FORCE the player into dealing with stroke 'whackiness' simply because the system will not work under those conditions. (My personal opinion is that NO aiming system (playing method) will be very successful with a fouled up stroke.)
Therefore the player MUST utilize some of the many stroke correction drills available all over the web and eliminate those troubles. If he doesn't, he will swear to high heaven that it's the "system's fault".
Stroke correction drills are not fun. They require dull boring repetition over and over and over.
In my opinion, Bert Kinister has one of the best drills and that is his Shot #1 in his "run out nine ball" videos. (Niles Fajein, was one of his students...(I probably spelled Niles' last name wrong, but you know who I mean). To quote Bert....."It will build a stroke where there is no stroke".
Shoot that shot 100-200 times a day every single day and in 30 days your twisting of the wrist should disappear.
THEN you can proceed with your chosen Aiming System....(I think CTE is the best out there FOR ME...that is.) The final decision on that will have to be yours though, not mine.
Good wishes to you.
(y)(y)
You spelled his 1st name wrong also. See, that's why I have a hard time believing things you say. You think you spelled it wrong. In that case why wouldn't you just take a second to look it up and get it right.
The lack of precision and attention to detail bothers me. Very simple thing to get right. If that's your MO why should we believe what you say about CTE. Just because? ccJB Cases
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Apparently this is another benefit of CTE. If you don't hit the CB properly the system doesn't work.
I was wondering--seeing as I'm having a hard time figuring out CTE--does anyone know of a different aiming system that also corrects stroke issues.
I have a bad habit of twisting my wrist on some shots so one that corrects that would be helpful.
Contact point aiming will fix your stroke. If you don't hit the contact point, it doesn't go. ;) 🤣 In all seriousness, if you get sick of the footspot to end rail and back to your cue, Bert Kinister's Mighty X drill helps. EDIT: Also make sure your stance is correct and in line, many times a wonky stroke is due to not having the cue on the shot line, same with chicken wings. If you're stance is correct on the shot line the wavy stroke and wings tend to go away.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Contact point aiming will fix your stroke. If you don't hit the contact point, it doesn't go. ;) 🤣 In all seriousness, if you get sick of the footspot to end rail and back to your cue, Bert Kinister's Mighty X drill helps. EDIT: Also make sure your stance is correct and in line, many times a wonky stroke is due to not having the cue on the shot line, same with chicken wings. If you're stance is correct on the shot line the wavy stroke and wings tend to go away.
The Mighty X drill sure is MIGHTY.
 

cookie man

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Apparently this is another benefit of CTE. If you don't hit the CB properly the system doesn't work.
I was wondering--seeing as I'm having a hard time figuring out CTE--does anyone know of a different aiming system that also corrects stroke issues.
I have a bad habit of twisting my wrist on some shots so one that corrects that would be helpful.
Look up c j wileys info on the hammer motion with your grip hand. That will help cure the wrist twist
 

Low500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You spelled his 1st name wrong also. See, that's why I have a hard time believing things you say. You think you spelled it wrong. In that case why wouldn't you just take a second to look it up and get it right.
The lack of precision and attention to detail bothers me. Very simple thing to get right. If that's your MO why should we believe what you say about CTE. Just because? ccJB Cases
Ahhh, come on man, cut me some slack.
I was hurrying to get out of the house to go to a meeting and just didn't carry out the spelling correctly. And didn't look it up.
Give me a break, my man, I didn't mean any disrespect to the guy...I was just loafing with my spelling while in a hurry.
The crux of my post was accurate though. And I was certainly trying to be sincere and helpful.
(and I do wish you well with curing that wrist twist)(y)
Here...maybe this will redeem me for the flop with the spelling=> Niels Feijen (google is my friend):)
 

tonythetiger583

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It is true that CTE will FORCE the player into dealing with stroke 'whackiness' simply because the system will not work under those conditions.
I chose cte as my first formal aiming system as a beginner. One of the major benefits I found was that it exposed me to a lot of angles that I would of shyed away from as a beginner.

I'd watch my teammates back-cut shots thick over and over and over, because it looked right and they were too afraid to cut any thinner. Or they'd end up having pet shots and shots they avoid.

For me there wasn't that "I over cut this or undercut that" Either I executed properly or I didn't. And that carried over into Angle, Speed Spin. Either you add the right amounts to do what you want, or you don't.

You're essentially missing out on that "Eh, good enough" thinking.

Not saying you can't accomplish the same thing with discipline, but as a beginner, the structure and glaring feedback was nice.

Biggest hurdle in pool imo at the early level, is pretending that's what you did, was what you were actually trying to do.
 

8pack

They call me 2 county !
Silver Member
Get a ghost ball aim trainer, it lets you shoot right at the shot line. If cte was excact in finding the aim line(which it isn't) how does knowing where to hit the cue ball straighten the stroke??? Shouldn't the ghost ball aim trainer do the same according to your theory.

You may have a bad stroke and nothing cures it unless you change something about what your bodies doing.

A straight in long shot is all you need to practice. Figure out what's going wrong with you.

What's next...cte cures covid.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You spelled his 1st name wrong also. See, that's why I have a hard time believing things you say. You think you spelled it wrong. In that case why wouldn't you just take a second to look it up and get it right.
The lack of precision and attention to detail bothers me. Very simple thing to get right. If that's your MO why should we believe what you say about CTE. Just because? ccJB Cases
Hell, forget about misspelling someone's name. He signs his posts using someone else's name. Some people use a nickname but I've never seen anyone else actually choose a different name than his own.
 

ballston

Registered
To the extent that you are implementing any accurate system properly, it will force you to have the cue on the right line when the tip hits the ball because otherwise you will keep missing. One such system is the corrected ghost ball.

But just putting the ball in the pocket doesn't mean you have fixed your stroke. There are lots of good players with poor strokes who pocket balls well.
What's the corrected ghost ball system?
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have a bad habit of twisting my wrist on some shots so one that corrects that would be helpful.
Check out your natural instincts with one handed, square to the rail, potting.

Ronnie O’Sullivan and Stephen Lee suggest tell us that the grip must be able to tighten and that a squeeze best describes that action.
Hold the cue, so that at the end of the follow, the forefinger is triggered into a forward and down flexed position.
A squeeze puts equal pressure on both sides of the cue meaning tightening still holds the cue on line while the equal and opposite pinching of the triggered fingers negate one another, countering any twist.
Try combining the one handed, the squeeze and then add a bridge vee to stabilize the cue on non-square alignments.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Ghost ball position "corrected" for throw. ..
And which could be to the left or the right on any shot depending on what's on the cue ball.

The "simple geometry" ghost ball, which is what people are usually thinking of, rarely puts the ball in the center of the pocket (due to throw) and is completely untrustworthy for shots longer than about 2-3 diamonds. This is very old news.
 
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