Drilling out a shaft

caff3in3

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So, times are a bit tough financially so I had to sell my predator.

It will be a couple years before i can buy another. I bought a beat up cue at a pawn shop for next to nothing and was thinking about drilling out the top 6 inches to make it somewhat LD. Has anyone done this with normal power tools? Any advice on what worked?



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I done this but i have a cueman's lathe. Although i didn't go to a bigger drill diameter. If i can remember i used like 4mm dia drill bit.

You might need to use around 6.5 mm diameter to really get it to LD shaft. You will risk of wrecking the shaft without a lathe.
 

JRusso

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Sounds like a gamble to me. Unless you have access to a good precision lathe you would likely end up with a shaft that plays worse. You may also find that the ferrule will become loose because the press fit that was likely there when it was installed will be reduced after the shaft is hollowed out.
If you had to pay a machinist to do the work it would likely cost more than buying a LD shaft....
 

a1712

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
. You may also find that the ferrule will become loose because the press fit that was likely there when it was installed will be reduced after the shaft is hollowed out..[/QUOTE]

Explain. Thanks, Brian.
 

Tramp Steamer

One Pocket enthusiast.
Silver Member
I did it, some fifteen years ago. I also had a Chris Hightower lathe at the time, and if memory serves, I used a 5/16th inch bit to make the hole.
I fed the drill bit way too fast on the first shaft, generating too much heat and warping the end of the shaft. It made a nice little glow as it burnt up in the wood stove.
On the second attempt I increased the depth of cut at a very slow rate, letting the bit and work cool before each pass was made. At about five inches, or so, I quit, put a ferrule and tip on, and gave it a try.
I really couldn't tell if it made any difference in the way the cue hit, but I told everybody it did, and left it at that. :smile:
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
If you're looking for lower deflection, another way to approach it is get rid of the ferrule all together. Glue the tip to the end of the shaft.
 

Chopdoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You should try this on another shaft first. Preferably a friend's shaft. Not your own. A distant friend....like maybe an enemy.....

LOL!


I wouldn't try it without a lathe.


Why not just learn to shoot with a regular wood shaft?

Here's an interesting thought...how many LD shafts were used to get on this list?
http://hermund.ardalen.com/straightpoolhighruns.htm


Use the time you would have wasted screwing with and potentially ruining the shaft to go practice with that shaft.




.
 

mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
No

So, times are a bit tough financially so I had to sell my predator.

It will be a couple years before i can buy another. I bought a beat up cue at a pawn shop for next to nothing and was thinking about drilling out the top 6 inches to make it somewhat LD. Has anyone done this with normal power tools? Any advice on what worked?



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Not without making the shaft shorter.
Normally the tennon on a LD shaft is allot bigger with super thin walled ferrule.

I can make you one but I would have to go with a new dowel.
 
Last edited:

JRusso

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
. You may also find that the ferrule will become loose because the press fit that was likely there when it was installed will be reduced after the shaft is hollowed out..

Explain. Thanks, Brian.[/QUOTE]
Admittedly my wood working experience is limited, but the concept in my mind would be similar to metal:
An example would be if you there were a bolt threaded into a hole that was seized simply drilling out the center of the bolt will release the pressure applied to the walls by minimally reducing the od of the fastener. The heat generated helps as well of course. The pressure of the press fit would I image be reduced now there is more give in the tenon.
It's just a guess I am not a cue maker. I have to assume on these production shafts the ferrule is fitted after the shaft is cored.
 

LAMas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So, times are a bit tough financially so I had to sell my predator.

It will be a couple years before i can buy another. I bought a beat up cue at a pawn shop for next to nothing and was thinking about drilling out the top 6 inches to make it somewhat LD. Has anyone done this with normal power tools? Any advice on what worked?



Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

Low Mass and more Flex.

Put a threaded rod in the shaft then put the rod into your drill motor the cut groove using saw blade like this:

Presentation1.jpg

Don't have to mess with the ferrule and tip.
 

caff3in3

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks for the info guys. I think the consensus is that no lathe = firewood and tramp......I bet it hit a ton!

A local guy does repair work so I might get him to do it on his lathe. Not too concerned if it doesn't work out, it was just a cheap cue and possibly a fun project

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macguy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So, times are a bit tough financially so I had to sell my predator.

It will be a couple years before i can buy another. I bought a beat up cue at a pawn shop for next to nothing and was thinking about drilling out the top 6 inches to make it somewhat LD. Has anyone done this with normal power tools? Any advice on what worked?



Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

I did it to the shaft I use and it did make a difference. I would not try it without a lathe. A lathe chuck will also supply added support to the wood so you don't split it.I finished it with a small wood plug to mount the ferrule on. I put on a 1/2 inch long ferrule with a wall of about .100 of an inch so the ferrules is almost non existent.
 
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