Ferrule High Spot

Biloxi69

Registered
Hello everyone. Occasionally after installing and getting the ferrule flushed with the shaft, I would get a high area on the ferrule where it meets the shaft.. All would be flushed with the shaft but one area. What are tips to getting this flushed? I usually just use sandpaper but not sure is the best method. I remember seeing a Hightower video where he file with a filer but seem so abrasive and might leave it flat instead of round. Thoughts anyone?

Thanks in advance,
Phi
 

JC

The Thread Stops Here
Gold Member
Hello everyone. Occasionally after installing and getting the ferrule flushed with the shaft, I would get a high area on the ferrule where it meets the shaft.. All would be flushed with the shaft but one area. What are tips to getting this flushed? I usually just use sandpaper but not sure is the best method. I remember seeing a Hightower video where he file with a filer but seem so abrasive and might leave it flat instead of round. Thoughts anyone?

Thanks in advance,
Phi

Either the shaft is not round or is not spinning concentrically when trimming the ferule.

I chuck up as close as possible to the ferule and make sure the wood is spinning true and that pretty much takes care of it unless the wood on the shaft is low.
 

Biloxi69

Registered
Got it. I’ll keep that in mind next time to make sure to indicate it. Thanks for the tip.

Regards,
Phi
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
That lathe bit do you face the ferrule and shaft with ?

Btw, if you cut a tenon to size with a dull cutter and in one day, it's like to move and make the ferrule slant after the glue dries.

I use live tooling to cut ferrule tenons these days. A lot less stressful on the wood.
 

Biloxi69

Registered
I use a 3/8” indexable bit. It seems to cut fine. I haven’t rotated it yet. Not sure what is the tell tell as to when I should change the bit. I thread the tenon manually by the way.

Phi
 

deadbeat

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
That lathe bit do you face the ferrule and shaft with ?

Btw, if you cut a tenon to size with a dull cutter and in one day, it's like to move and make the ferrule slant after the glue dries.

I use live tooling to cut ferrule tenons these days. A lot less stressful on the wood.

I haven't had a lot of trouble with this, but, I am very interested in learning new things. What kind of live cutter do you use? With a dremel or a router or something more precise? Not questioning your knowledge because I think you are doing something wrong, just wanting to learn.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I haven't had a lot of trouble with this, but, I am very interested in learning new things. What kind of live cutter do you use? With a dremel or a router or something more precise? Not questioning your knowledge because I think you are doing something wrong, just wanting to learn.

Makita palm router and 4 flute flat bottom end mill.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'm not a cue-maker but did cue repairs locally for a few years a while back. Some of the other member will for sure have more experience than me. That said, the below was my experience:

I found for me, using a 4 jaw independent chuck, and indicating in the work using it every single ferrule job, was well worth the extra time it takes to use the 4-jaw chuck. I was on a hightower mid-size lathe, and there is a 4-jaw chuck made for it. Using this method, you can split the difference of any out-of-roundness of the shaft.

Regarding your tool, as others have said, it has to be sharp. If not, it will push the ferrule instead of cutting it. One way to test, is to take a cut of .001" on the diameter. If your tool can't make a clean cut removing that small of material, it is not sharp enough. I used a carbide tool, but kept a diamond hone in my apron pocket. I'd touch up the tool before every ferrule job.

Another thing to check is that your tool is truly cutting round. It should be if its sharp. But to verify, use micrometers on the ferrule. Calipers are not good enough for that measurement, imo.

If all checks out with the tool being sharp, and you cutting the ferrule perfectly round, and you splitting the difference when you indicate in the shaft, then the shaft is out of round. At that point, what I did, was cut up the shaft at the new ferrule diameter about 100 or 200 thou. The tool will only be cutting the shaft on one or two sides. Then sand that area with 400 or so. Then take some spit on your finger, and rub it on the dirty wood of the shaft you did not sand, and rub the dirt onto the cut area. It will blend in, and make the shaft look the same.

Remember, if you are having this problem, (and everything else checks out), that means the shaft is not round to begin with. So you either make a non-round ferrule to fit, or make the end of the shaft round to fit the new ferrule that is round. There is a problem either way. I liked this way myself:)
 
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