Forkbit tool for antique Brunswick rails.

Pooldoctor

Registered
When using a forkbit tool to tighten railbolts what's the best tool to use to turn the bit . Crescent wrench, vise-grip pliers, or other options. Thanks for any advice.
 

JZMechanix

www.billiardmechanix.net
Silver Member
I stuck mine in a deep well socket and then melted some wax into it to give it a tighter hold and fill in the voids. Then I just attach it to my ratchet like any other socket and it works great!
 

ArizonaPete

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If I remember correctly (had an old Brunswick 30 some years ago) I used my auger hand drill. I believe they were made to fit those.
 

Dartman

Pro Billiards
Silver Member
Never had a problem snugging t-bolts by hand.
I use a ratcheting combo wrench to tighten..
An open end or adjustable crescent works fine too.

 

kid

billiard mechanic
Silver Member
try out a simple long nose plier .no adjustments, goes deeper in the fork holes ,lot more torque,always have one around...
 

Dartman

Pro Billiards
Silver Member
try out a simple long nose plier .no adjustments, goes deeper in the fork holes ,lot more torque,always have one around...

If youwant to use needlenose pliers it's best to have a spare for when you break off a point.
Been there done that.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
For what it's worth, if you guys use a 1/4" drill bit to clean up the bit holes on the bolts, it'll do wonders for your bit to take hold in the holes so bit won't keep slipping off when you're trying to tighten or loosen the bolts.

Glen
 

reverend

Table Mechanic
Silver Member
Say a guy was going to use a torque wrench on these old bolts, what would a good number be to shoot for?
 

3kushn

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm interested in the answer to this being a torque nerd. Maybe we can get an answer
with or without washers. Are washers recommended? Drilling the holes is a great technique.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
I'm interested in the answer to this being a torque nerd. Maybe we can get an answer
with or without washers. Are washers recommended? Drilling the holes is a great technique.

15ft lbs would be enough, more than that and you're going to keep compressing the wood sub-rail, less an they'll be loose.
 

dave_k

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I never use the spanner tool, always a needle nose asking with a cres wrench fit as tight on the needle nose and as close to the rail bolt as I can.

It's rare that it slips out and great turning power with the added cres

Sent from my SCH-I500
 

3kushn

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I never use the spanner tool, always a needle nose asking with a cres wrench fit as tight on the needle nose and as close to the rail bolt as I can.

It's rare that it slips out and great turning power with the added cres

Sent from my SCH-I500
That probably works but with 2 issues.
1) wear safety glasses. The plier tips may break.
2) At most you can only get 180degrees Rotation

Here's a better solution if you don't want to use the fork spanner.

Adjustable pin spanner. It eliminates issue #1 only.

pin_spanner_wrench.jpg
 

chevybob20

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It's amazing the different names that tools have. I was taught that this type of spanner was called a "face pin spanner". The one that looks like a set of dividers is an "adjustable face pin spanner". I know, I'm a tool name snob.:eek:
 

3kushn

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It's amazing the different names that tools have. I was taught that this type of spanner was called a "face pin spanner". The one that looks like a set of dividers is an "adjustable face pin spanner". I know, I'm a tool name snob.:eek:
I stand corrected. I've out of the hand tool business for over 12 years and my memory is about as long as my .
 

Tennesseejoe

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
For what it's worth, if you guys use a 1/4" drill bit to clean up the bit holes on the bolts, it'll do wonders for your bit to take hold in the holes so bit won't keep slipping off when you're trying to tighten or loosen the bolts.

Glen

Great idea Glen. Thanks. How much torque can I use?
 
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