GRIP QUESTION

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Should there be a space between
the V part of the skin between the thumb and index finger
or should the cue touch that part of your hand?
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
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Should there be a space between
the V part of the skin between the thumb and index finger
or should the cue touch that part of your hand?
If there is daylight between the stick and the hand at the start of the stroke, it's nearly always gone by the end. I think that change in the shape of the hand during the stroke is bad.
 

WobblyStroke

Well-known member
there are plenty of good players that have a gap. it def can work but as bob mentioned, there's just more that can go wrong. at my best in my 20s i had a slight gap as did niels feijen who I originally copied in the early 2000s. now older and wiser neither of us play as well as we did but neither of us have a gap now either lol.

I will say tho that when i played a gap I was never really a squeezer or someone who closed the entire hand tight on the cue. started with a loose cage and ended with a loose cage. the cue was more in contact with the cue by the end, but my hand didnt really change shape all the much and the cue just pivoted in my hand.

Anyone who ends fully closed around the cue probably should start in contact with it all the way around as Bob suggested.
 
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FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Should there be a space between
the V part of the skin between the thumb and index finger
or should the cue touch that part of your hand?
Players who squeeze the cue with their first two fingers won't have a gap. Those who grip more with the last three will have a small gap in the V between the first two because the first two aren't the primary grip fingers. I have a gap and it has never been an issue because they're not my primary grip fingers.
 

tableroll

Rolling Thunder
Silver Member
Players who squeeze the cue with their first two fingers won't have a gap. Those who grip more with the last three will have a small gap in the V between the first two because the first two aren't the primary grip fingers. I have a gap and it has never been an issue because they're not my primary grip fingers.
I like the thumb and next two finger grip. It seems to give me a better controlled hit. I sometimes remove my middle finger on delicate shots
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I like the thumb and next two finger grip. It seems to give me a better controlled hit. I sometimes remove my middle finger on delicate shots
Why do you need to control the hit with your grip? Is your arm swing not straight?
 

Island Drive

Otto/Dads College Roommate/Cleveland Browns
Silver Member
Judd Trump holdin' the handle.
 

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Kjackxon

Member
This is good intel!
Trump being a snooker player would have pressure in the last three fingers right? I feel that the cue is out of alignment when the primary pressure is there, and that impacts speed and consistency. I agree that the primary grip pressure is not pressure but technique. Moving the grip up, using my V as a rudder allows me to use my first two fingers to control the stroke. I get a better feedback especially with longer shots.
I’m just an average guy who doesn’t mind learning from his peers. I added a couple of views from Barry Stark’s video for reference. I hope that I’m not breaking any rules 😳
 

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Island Drive

Otto/Dads College Roommate/Cleveland Browns
Silver Member
Keep in mind, the handle on Trumps snooker stick is allot smaller than a pool cue.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Judd Trump holdin' the handle.
One of the best....
This is good intel!
Trump being a snooker player would have pressure in the last three fingers right? I feel that the cue is out of alignment when the primary pressure is there, and that impacts speed and consistency. I agree that the primary grip pressure is not pressure but technique. Moving the grip up, using my V as a rudder allows me to use my first two fingers to control the stroke. I get a better feedback especially with longer shots.
I’m just an average guy who doesn’t mind learning from his peers. I added a couple of views from Barry Stark’s video for reference. I hope that I’m not breaking any rules 😳
seems like those 3 have no space in the V between the thumb and index finger side of hand
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
here is a pic with a gap as recommended in mark wilson's book "Play better pool"
mark wilson grip.jpg
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Corey told me, get rid of the ''gap''.
I said why, his response.
Gaps cause....
Lateral cue movement.
Gaps also cause vertical cue movement. The hand nearly always closes by the end of the stroke. That will lift the cue.

If the hand doesn't close, the stick doesn't stop and when it impales an innocent bystander there is a lot of paper work to fill out. Or even a guilty bystander.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So the grip doesn’t change during the stroke, making the straight stroke unstraight.

pj
chgo
I'm not sure if you're joking or not but I'll reply as if you were serious. There's a way to grip the cue where your hand naturally rolls as your arm moves through, right along with the cue, and it's all caused by nothing more than the arm moving through the stroke. There's no strange movement going on causing your cue to go 'unstraight.' The follow through position is with the V between the first two fingers laying flat on top of the cue. You can't get any more natural and straight than that. No wrist cocking going on --- none of that stuff.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
I'm not sure if you're joking or not but I'll reply as if you were serious. There's a way to grip the cue where your hand naturally rolls as your arm moves through, right along with the cue, and it's all caused by nothing more than the arm moving through the stroke. There's no strange movement going on causing your cue to go 'unstraight.' The follow through position is with the V between the first two fingers laying flat on top of the cue. You can't get any more natural and straight than that. No wrist cocking going on --- none of that stuff.
Yes, that sounds like the kind of grip I mean by “controlled” - doesn’t change, so doesn’t affect the stroke.

pj
chgo
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yes, that sounds like the kind of grip I mean by “controlled” - doesn’t change, so doesn’t affect the stroke.

pj
chgo
But when a player keeps the pressure on the first two fingers throughout the stroke, that is an example of going against the natural movement of the arm swing because the player will have to engage his wrist in order to keep the pressure up front until the end.
 

WobblyStroke

Well-known member
But when a player keeps the pressure on the first two fingers throughout the stroke, that is an example of going against the natural movement of the arm swing because the player will have to engage his wrist in order to keep the pressure up front until the end.
It's more of a passive wrist action tho. Something that happens but not something that needs to be performed or timed by the player. They just hold on and swing the arm.

Plus if they really want to they can stabilize the wrist and take any movement out that way.

Lotta ways to skin a cat. The vast majority of players utilize the front fingers. Works just fine when done right.

My fav grip uses the first 2 fingers. I tend to finish on the middle finger but it isnt something I think about.
 
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