Help with cue tip contact point.

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Sometimes our subconscious vetoes our aiming decisions because it knows we're not good enough for that aim yet.
Your subconscious mind can't reason. It only reacts in the way that it's taught to react.
It doesn't need to reason, and we don't need to consciously "teach" it. It's "taught" by our experience and can "learn" things before we know them consciously.

pj
chgo
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It doesn't need to reason, and we don't need to consciously "teach" it. It's "taught" by our experience and can "learn" things before we know them consciously.

pj
chgo
Oh c'mon now. You're splitting hairs on the word 'teach.' Of course we teach our subconscious mind. We do it through repetition. That's how habits are created. And it's not a matter of it not NEEDING to reason --- it CAN'T reason. It's incapable of it. It can't reason, nor decide that you're not good enough for something.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Interesting....I used to use Moori mediums and then switched to Kamaui Black soft which were about the equivalent in hardness. I played mostly 9 ball and I found that I had to shape the tip quite often when it started getting flat and I also had to scuff it regularly because it would frequently get smooth -- and chalking was part of my pre shot routine so it was never an issue of not enough chalk.
Maybe I just never noticed or cared that the tip got smooth. I didn't miscue, so I didn't care. Ignorance is bliss! :eek:)
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Maybe I just never noticed or cared that the tip got smooth. I didn't miscue, so I didn't care. Ignorance is bliss! :eek:)
Well, I was playing a lot of pool during those times. I averaged 3-4 hours per day Mon through Fri plus a couple of weekly tournaments, and then all day and evenings on the weekends.
 

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What is all this back and forth about. All Fran's saying (and she's absolutely correct) is that the SC or muscle memory for that matter, has no ability to determine whether an action is right or wrong, correct or incorrect.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
...the SC or muscle memory for that matter, has no ability to determine whether an action is right or wrong, correct or incorrect.
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon (for example) seem to think otherwise:


"...brain regions important for decision-making remain active even while our brains may be simultaneously engaged in unrelated tasks, such as thinking about a math problem. What’s most intriguing about this finding is that participants did not have any awareness that their brains were still working on the decision problem while they were engaged in an unrelated task."

I think "muscle memory" is something else, like the "optimization" of neural pathways used to perform a physical task.

pj
chgo
 

The_JV

Local_Pro
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon (for example) seem to think otherwise:


"...brain regions important for decision-making remain active even while our brains may be simultaneously engaged in unrelated tasks, such as thinking about a math problem. What’s most intriguing about this finding is that participants did not have any awareness that their brains were still working on the decision problem while they were engaged in an unrelated task."

I think "muscle memory" is something else, like the "optimization" of neural pathways used to perform a physical task.

pj
chgo
Now you've done it.... Stupid facts debunking theories 🤷‍♂️
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon (for example) seem to think otherwise:


"...brain regions important for decision-making remain active even while our brains may be simultaneously engaged in unrelated tasks, such as thinking about a math problem. What’s most intriguing about this finding is that participants did not have any awareness that their brains were still working on the decision problem while they were engaged in an unrelated task."

I think "muscle memory" is something else, like the "optimization" of neural pathways used to perform a physical task.

pj
chgo
OMG. Where do I begin...The subconscious mind CAN NOT TELL RIGHT FROM WRONG. Whatever it's doing is based on what it was taught by the person through repetition. The fact that it continues to function while a person thinks on a conscious level is not new news. In fact, it's quite amateurish to state that as a 'finding.' But when a research grant has been awarded, there has to be a conclusion or there won't be the next grant. ....And the author, well, I'll just leave it there. Let's hope he became a lot more educated since he wrote that article in 2013.

But I do want to say --- good for you, Patrick, for wanting to understand how the sub conscious mind works. I have been studying it for the last 30 years and it still continues to fascinate me. I hope everyone takes that much interest because it's an important aspect in playing sports, and that includes cue sports.
 
Last edited:

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
OMG. Where do I begin...
Maybe with your credentials compared to the university psychology professors who conducted that study? No offense, but I'll take their conclusions, even 8 years old, over yours on this topic - at least until I see something authoritative otherwise.

pj
chgo
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon (for example) seem to think otherwise:


"...brain regions important for decision-making remain active even while our brains may be simultaneously engaged in unrelated tasks, such as thinking about a math problem. What’s most intriguing about this finding is that participants did not have any awareness that their brains were still working on the decision problem while they were engaged in an unrelated task."

I think "muscle memory" is something else, like the "optimization" of neural pathways used to perform a physical task.

pj
chgo
I had a REALLY good player tell me yrs ago that when he was in dead punch it felt like he wasn't doing the shooting but he was just watching himself do it. I've had a few, oh-so-brief episodes like this. This topic made me think of it. Its almost like the less you care(to a certain degree) the better you play. Who knows but its awesome when you get there.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Maybe with your credentials compared to the university psychology professors who conducted that study? No offense, but I'll take their conclusions, even 8 years old, over yours on this topic - at least until I see something authoritative otherwise.

pj
chgo
Nah. My criticism is about the article and the way it's written. We don't really know what that study showed, do we? The writer was all over the place which showed a lack of knowledge on the subject matter. If all the study was about was that the subconscious part of the brain lights up when the conscious part is operating, then that's old news. If there's something more, it wasn't made clear by the writer. Sorry, but arbitrary articles like that don't do a study any justice at all. It makes them look like a bunch of amateurs.
 
Top