How far can you break?

kolaas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Imagine a pooltable that is hundreds of meters long. How far do you think you can break? Breaking straight would be important here too. Every degree you're off means you'll get less far..
 

bigshooter

<--vs Chuck Norris on TAR
Silver Member
I think I could hit the one ball dead on, jump the cue ball back to the exact center of the table while pocketing the 3, 6 & 7 balls.
I have a perfect shot on the one and run out.
 

Luxury

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You said hundreds of meters long. I think I could break to the end of a two hundred meter table and bounce all the way back for a perfect lag, frozen to the rail.
 

kolaas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Im serious, I wonder how far it will roll. It can probaby be calculated but I dont know the math (or the physics) to do it.

My guess is that I'll make 100m.
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
Im serious, I wonder how far it will roll. It can probaby be calculated but I dont know the math (or the physics) to do it.

My guess is that I'll make 100m.

I think you should tell us the weight of the cloth and how tight it is stretched....and the thickness of the slate.
And the temperature is an influence also.
 

kolaas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thats true.. well lets say it are the US open conditions. The same hall but very long stretched, same air conditions, fresh Simonis cloth (any chalk has been taken off by chalk-off GET YOUR CH-never mind), same thickness of the slate. And we all break on that same table (although its magically renewed for every shot).
 

kolaas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I can only guess, but it feels that the first 20m the cueball is travelling at about max speed, and from there it will slow down. 80m of rolling is alot.. maybe my 100m is to much.
 

Autist

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I can only guess, but it feels that the first 20m the cueball is travelling at about max speed, and from there it will slow down. 80m of rolling is alot.. maybe my 100m is to much.

The cue ball speed is highest just after contacting the cue tip, after that, it starts to slow down.

I have thought about it too, would be interesting to know.
Any math guys out there?
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
lets see now.

When I was a youngster I could throw a baseball around 80 mph. The outfield fence was 420 at it's deepest in left center. I could get it to home plate, not on the fly or even the hop but on the roll. Pool cloth would give more distance on the roll. So lets see if that ball was hitting and rolling on a pool table like surface....lets be generous and say another 80 feet.My fastest break is like around 23 mph. So round my break speed up to 25 and my baseball throw down to 75 mph. So 1/3 of 500 feet would be 167 feet which would be 51 meters.

51 meters:D
 

Luxury

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When I was a youngster I could throw a baseball around 80 mph. The outfield fence was 420 at it's deepest in left center. I could get it to home plate, not on the fly or even the hop but on the roll. Pool cloth would give more distance on the roll. So lets see if that ball was hitting and rolling on a pool table like surface....lets be generous and say another 80 feet.My fastest break is like around 23 mph. So round my break speed up to 25 and my baseball throw down to 75 mph. So 1/3 of 500 feet would be 167 feet which would be 51 meters.

51 meters:D

I don't think you are being generous enough. There is wayyy more friction on a baseball field.

I'm thinking I could break 80 yards.
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
I don't think you are being generous enough. There is wayyy more friction on a baseball field.

I'm thinking I could break 80 yards.
Could be, just a WAG for fun.:D
Besides I was just sandbagging. I'll see your 80 and raise you 5! ;)
 

Dunnn51

Wait for something good
Silver Member
i Tink

I am no math wiz, but isn't S= D/T ??
Then D= S*T given a drag co-efficient for the cloth (who knows what that is?)

oh,..... D = Distance
S= Speed
T= Time

I could be wrong ,..... its late here! :shrug:
 

kolaas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
that is true for a continuous speed.

s = 1/2 a t^2

if I remember correctly.

s = distance
a = acceleration
t = time

but this doesnt involve friction. or is the friction within a?

I know one man who would solve this in a minute: DrDave!!
 

CreeDo

Fargo Rating 597
Silver Member
arghh... someone did this experiment. I think I read about it in a Byrne book. Or possibly on here. Was there maybe a video too?

They removed the back rail from the pool table, had someone break hard at like 30+ mph, then measured how far the CB rolled down the street. Not perfectly scientific but pretty fun.

In searching for the video, I was able to find this extremely important piece of information.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=HHnE6jvrK1k#t=794s
 

eastcoast_chris

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Here are my calculations ....

Using metric;

Cue ball weight = 5.5 oz = 0.156 kg
Friction = 0.2 (typical, could be a bit lower for 760, etc.)
Break speed = 30 mph = 13.41 m/s

KE = 0.5*W*Speed*Speed
KE = 0.5*0.156*13.41*13.41
KE = 14.02 J

Fn = Friction * Mass * Acceleration
Fn = 0.2 * 0.156 * 9.81
Fn = 0.306072

Distance = KE / Fn
Distance = 14.02 / 0.306072
Distance = 45.81 Meters

Which seems about right .... half a football field till it would stop rolling when hit at 30 mph assuming a coefficient of friction of 0.2
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
You can try using a lag shot setup as a basis,see how much force you can put into your break and measure the bounces you get.

If you have an app like breakspeed, it will tell you exactly how fast your break is.

Im serious, I wonder how far it will roll. It can probaby be calculated but I dont know the math (or the physics) to do it.

My guess is that I'll make 100m.
 
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