How (not) to move a 7' Diamond table...

SPetty

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
PART ONE
(I can upload only five pics at a time?)

I sold my 7' Diamond Pro-Am table. I never thought it would happen. It's a rather sad ending time for me, but at the same time, a new beginning.

Disclaimer: Names and faces are not included because the buyers really are good people and it is not my intention to identify or embarrass them. They are already as embarrassed and apologetic as they can be. I'm just the picture-taker.

But I'm trying to laugh to keep from crying, and just thought I'd share this with y'all...
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This is the "before" pic. I have cleared the room of obstacles and is ready for the big move! The buyers will be saving the cost of hiring a professional mover, and will move it themselves. Two guys will do it all. Can't wait to see the "after" pic! Includes two bottles of congratulatory holiday liquer!
Pic1c.jpg

The unique idea is to protect the skirt while putting the table on its side, and helping to keep it flat after it is on its side. So remove two legs and add a frame that will take the weight when the table is tilted onto its side.
Pic2c.jpg

Two shorter pieces of 2x4 will be attached to the leg bases and connected by a longer 2x6. So here, one piece of 2x4 has been attached to the far side, and the closer side has now been jacked up and ready for the next piece of 2x4 to be attached.
Pic3c.jpg

This is close to the intended solution. The cross board is still a bit twisted and hasn't been fully lag-screwed, so it isn't yet complete here. But you can see that the plan is that as the table is let down, it will tilt and the weight will be transferred to the table leg bases via the 2x6 lag bolted into the 2x4s that are attached to the leg bases using the original leg screws into the original leg screw holes.
Pic4c.jpg

They chose a pallet jack to use to move it. The plan is that the 2x6 goes onto one fork and the top rail goes onto the other fork! Takes a bit of finagling to get them in exactly the right place.
Pic5c.jpg
 
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SPetty

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Part Two

PART TWO
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Heave-Ho. Vertical is good, right? And it's not too close to those cabinets against the wall, right?
Pic6c.jpg

Are the forks on the pallet jack are long enough? Surely this rope will do the trick - wrap it around the leg to help stabilize it on the forks and lift the end up to help put the weight on the pallet jack.
Pic8c.jpg

Good news! Glass is intact. House cues are OK. One glass door got slightly scuffed and the small cabinet doesn't appear repairable with broken hinges and torn particle board.
Pic9c.jpg

After lifting and leveraging under the table to get his phone out (they could hear it ringing), they removed the unique bracing, replaced the original legs (oops, they're swapped), picked up their tools and cleared out. The U-Haul truck was returned unused.
Pic10c.jpg

And despite my hopes that it was a nightmare and my wishes for magic elves, it doesn't look any better the next morning.
Pic11c.jpg

I sure hope the mover (whoever that might be) will be able to figure it out. But it looks like I'll be keeping the table just a little longer. But it looks less happy now.

Again, trying to laugh to keep from crying - I've cried enough. :crying:
 
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logical

Part of the Conspiracy
Silver Member
I'm not above occasionally doing a little slightly questionable rigging to save a buck or do what should be a two man job by myself (I once moved a 500 lbs safe from my garage into my walkout basement by waiting for a good snow, tipping it over onto a tarp and pulling it like a toboggan with my ATV)..but when the forks on that pallet jack are clearly won't reach the center of the table it's time to stop and re-engineer.

Sent from my SM-T830 using Tapatalk
 

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
Misunderstandings happen when you hire people from the Southern Hemisphere.
 

9BallKY

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I can’t believe they didn’t hang around to re-level it after they got it in position. ��*♂️
 

Johnny Rosato

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Couple of good 'ol boys was gonna "crackerize" that job! (hope you were paid 1st)
 
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ChopStick

Unsane Poster
Silver Member
I sure hope the mover (whoever that might be) will be able to figure it out. But it looks like I'll be keeping the table just a little longer. But it looks less happy now.

Again, trying to laugh to keep from crying - I've cried enough. :crying:

Geez Spetty. Sorry for your loss. I never seen a dead one before. :p

 

Eric.

Club a member
Silver Member
SPetty! Sorry about your troubles but nice to hear from ya. It's been a long time, I miss ya!


Eric
 

ceebee

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hi Spetty...

Hi Susan, hope you are well & doing well. Say Hello to your Husband, for all of us Spetty Ranch fans...

Hopoe thinsg are OK at your place, sure miss them trips to Spetty Ranch & I certainly miss all the INVITES, who came to your gatherings. Those WERE the Days.... CB
 

jokrswylde

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Question for Diamond owners or folks who have moved them- what makes them more difficult to move than other tables?

What I mean is I have moved gold crowns, oldhausens, and valleys....all pretty much the same way. Remove slate, remove legs, get some buddies with carrying straps, move table, move slate, move legs....reassemble and level.

Diamond has people moving it for boatloads of money, special dolleys that cost a bunch, here we have special brackets engineered...Is there something different about the way they are put together that makes it more difficult to move them?
 

Black-Balled

He Rides the Skies
Silver Member
I guess it is the 1pc slate and the fact that it permits the table to be moved as a single piece...as opposed to 3pc slates' increased likelihood of becoming unjoined, when moved assembled?
Question for Diamond owners or folks who have moved them- what makes them more difficult to move than other tables?

What I mean is I have moved gold crowns, oldhausens, and valleys....all pretty much the same way. Remove slate, remove legs, get some buddies with carrying straps, move table, move slate, move legs....reassemble and level.

Diamond has people moving it for boatloads of money, special dolleys that cost a bunch, here we have special brackets engineered...Is there something different about the way they are put together that makes it more difficult to move them?
 

Z-Nole

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Misunderstandings happen when you hire people from the Southern Hemisphere.

No chance these schmucks were true rednecks. Because a true redneck may leave to go get more beer, but there’s no way they take a U-Haul back without getting the job done. Those guys were just good old fashion idiots.
 

jsp

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
And despite my hopes that it was a nightmare and my wishes for magic elves, it doesn't look any better the next morning.
Sorry to laugh at your misfortune, but this is the funniest line I've read on this forum in a while.
 
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