Is pool the most difficult sport for an Amateur to turn Pro?

Keith Jawahir

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Been doing some reading and just got curious. I just read some statistic that 20% of amateur boxers turn pro. I know the number for Pool players is way lower, just curious how low it actually is.
 

DelawareDogs

I'll take 2 the and break
Silver Member
Of course it's much lower......

Think of a lower paying sport other than pro pool.... bass fisherman make oodles more than pro pool players.

But correlation is not causation.... so think of the number of amateur golfers out there, and the number of pro golfers in the circuit. I'm not so sure what the percentage is supposed to reflect, other than how many people actually want to turn pro.
 

PoolChump

Banned
Been doing some reading and just got curious. I just read some statistic that 20% of amateur boxers turn pro. I know the number for Pool players is way lower, just curious how low it actually is.
Simple answer: Yes. Why? Because there is little money to be made. There is way less money in pool versus other sports, so why invest your time and career in a dead industry. Only the top 10 players make over $100,000.00 US dollars. If money isn't important, then I would say no. There are many great players. Invest 1 solid year of your time with proper coaching and practice and almost anybody can play pool at a short-stop, A, or A+ level. Pool isn't difficult. Consistency is the key. Solid fundamentals = consistency = high level player
 

ctyhntr

RIP Kelly
Silver Member
Yoga exploded in the last decade or so. I know many women who took up as a hobby, and now teach it professionally because there is money in it. Unfortunately there is no money in pool. If Yoga knowledge and skill was transposed to pool, we're talking C+s in Yoga being able to earn money teaching.
 

bad_hit

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Invest 1 solid year of your time with proper coaching and practice and almost anybody can play pool at a short-stop, A, or A+ level. Pool isn't difficult. Consistency is the key. Solid fundamentals = consistency = high level player

LOL! Oh is that all it takes? Just practice for a year and get some coaching and I'll be a top player? Dude...

It takes a LOT more than that.
 

arnaldo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yoga exploded in the last decade or so. I know many women who took up as a hobby, and now teach it professionally because there is money in it. Unfortunately there is no money in pool. If Yoga knowledge and skill was transposed to pool, we're talking C+s in Yoga being able to earn money teaching.
Interesting slightly off-topic point comes my mind from the mention of "C+s in Yoga" able to earn money teaching:

I would guess that virtually every single one of today's well known pool instructors were A+ players when their skills were at their lifetime peak. I know of no exceptions to this among widely recommended pool instructors.

Arnaldo
 

PoolChump

Banned
LOL! Oh is that all it takes? Just practice for a year and get some coaching and I'll be a top player? Dude...

It takes a LOT more than that.

Well I can agree that some people can't handle stressful situations, which can affect playing ability, but you can work or improve your mental game in pool. :thumbup:
 

DelawareDogs

I'll take 2 the and break
Silver Member
...but is it the most difficult?

But back to the question.....is it the most difficult?

It's more difficult than team based sports. Scouts pick you up, with million dollar endorsements, to do one job really well on the team. Be a good point guard. Pitch a great game. Hit a bunch of homers, etc. whereas in pool, you are the safety, you are the point guard, hell you're even the ref most of the time.

In individual sports, I would argue it's more difficult to go pro than team sports.
 

bad_hit

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well I can agree that some people can't handle stressful situations, which can affect playing ability, but you can work or improve your mental game in pool. :thumbup:

I mean time-wise. Are you saying someone can be an A or higher player in 1 year? Are you an A or higher player?
 

PoolChump

Banned
I mean time-wise. Are you saying someone can be an A or higher player in 1 year? Are you an A or higher player?
Yes, anybody with good hand and eye coordination along with the desire or drive to become good at playing pool can achieve a A- player ability with proper coaching and practice.

Yes, A player. I have been playing for over 20 years. Once you are at a A- skill level, it really matters how much time you invest in playing. Somebody who plays 5 hours a week (me), versus a top 20 player who plays 8 hours a day 7 days a week will be better.
 

bad_hit

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yes, anybody with good hand and eye coordination along with the desire or drive to become good at playing pool can achieve a A- player ability with proper coaching and practice.

Yes, A player. I have been playing for over 20 years. Once you are at a A- skill level, it really matters how much time you invest in playing. Somebody who plays 5 hours a week (me), versus a top 20 player who plays 8 hours a day 7 days a week will be better.

Well yeah...agree...eventually. You said 1 year though.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
No.
You just need two years of practice and a Revo cue.
I believe bodybuilding is even tougher.
 
Last edited:

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
baseball in general is considered the hardest to turn pro in.....



speaking of yoga.....

i find it appalling that people send their kids to dance lessons......generally costing 50$ per hour for a CLASS setting with many many other kids......

i had a friend that was sending her kid to some know nothing for such lessons, just common dance instructor, no one special.......complaining about cost.....i said ya know remember i sang for the second ranked choir in nation....she says "yes".....well one of the families who had 3 kids in there, they teach voice and piano lessons for 15$/half hour for either or...the kids all teach, the parents are both professionals (well the kids are all pros now too)....ONE on ONE......

talk about a dam racket right there....i swear the only reason to pu tyour kids in dance....is so they can learn to dance and grow up to rip off other kids an their parents for 50/hr......

just about evey other thing i can think about that lessons can cost even LESS than that....your getting one on one instruction.

pool lessons are cheap compared to lots of stuff, ad generally we get them one on one.

think lessons are expensive? what if ever intructor here and out there all gave classes for 50$ hr that included 25+ people in it........then we couldstart talking about the instructor "illuminatti" lol
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
Yes, anybody with good hand and eye coordination along with the desire or drive to become good at playing pool can achieve a A- player ability with proper coaching and practice.

Yes, A player. I have been playing for over 20 years. Once you are at a A- skill level, it really matters how much time you invest in playing. Somebody who plays 5 hours a week (me), versus a top 20 player who plays 8 hours a day 7 days a week will be better.

not true.....depends on quality of play, practice and opponents at end of day.

I can get more done in less time than many A players I know personally.....quality over quantity......

to me the only time quantity matters is at the beginning when your getting to know your cue and the motions and such, then hopefullly there is a quanitity of quality....lamest 5000 post ever lol....guess i'll have to stick around for another 5000
 
Last edited:

bad_hit

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Depends on how you define "amateur" and "pro". 20% is an extremely high percentage though so I think this can be calculated by comparing to other sports besides boxing, something like...

Baseball
- There are about 15 million baseball players in the US (at all levels/"have played baseball at all in the last 12 months").

- There's about 6600 pro players across major/minor/farm.

- 6600 is .044% of 15 Million

Pool
- The BCA says there are about 46 million people playing pool in the US ('have played at all in the last 12 months")

- There are about 1000 professional pool players (very rough guess)

- 1000 is .002% of 46 million

If we only count regular league players and assume there are 1 million league players then it's something like 2.17%

Where's Mike Page or that AtLarge dude when you need them? :grin:
 

Texas Carom Club

play 1cushion & balkline
Silver Member
Of course it's much lower......

Think of a lower paying sport other than pro pool.... bass fisherman make oodles more than pro pool players.

But correlation is not causation.... so think of the number of amateur golfers out there, and the number of pro golfers in the circuit. I'm not so sure what the percentage is supposed to reflect, other than how many people actually want to turn pro.

pro bass fishing is a dream job for me
Traveling the country
Seeing new sites
Beauty lakes.
Good money prizes
Free 40k bass boats from time to time
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
Depends on how you define "amateur" and "pro". 20% is an extremely high percentage though so I think this can be calculated by comparing to other sports besides boxing, something like...

Baseball
- There are about 15 million baseball players in the US (at all levels/"have played baseball at all in the last 12 months").

- There's about 6600 pro players across major/minor/farm.

- 6600 is .044% of 15 Million

Pool
- The BCA says there are about 46 million people playing pool in the US ('have played at all in the last 12 months")

- There are about 1000 professional pool players (very rough guess) (that are possibly known

- 1000 is .002% of 46 million

If we only count regular league players and assume there are 1 million league players then it's something like 2.17%

Where's Mike Page or that AtLarge dude when you need them? :grin:

problem with the game of pool is there is no real guage or card to become pro....there are many unknowns who play at a pro level.....

look at Donny Mills....he was not very known at one time for a wide audience....and for whatever reason.....his name sounds like a car salesmans name lmfao! Great Player!
 
Top