Obsessed with how many feather-strokes I will do

LeonD123

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hi,

By feather-strokes I mean going back and forth with my cue before hitting.

I have 1 year of billiard under my belt, fast learner, can run racks.

But I have one obsession, I keep thinking about how many time I go back and forth with my cue, usually 2 to 4. Also thinking about the pace and style.

I'm a big fan of Ronnie O'Sullivan's cue action, 90% of the regular shots he's "feathering" 3 times, 1 long, one short and one long. If you know what I mean.

But no matter who I should/n't try to copy, my question is simple:

Should I try, from now, to force myself into having the same type of cue action ? (Ronnie's)

Or should I try to find my own style, during months/years, risking to end up with something not that elegant ? (yes I care about the elegancy of my gesture)
 

336Robin

Multiverse Operative
Gold Member
Silver Member
Dialed in Point.

Pool is extremely subjective but here's my two cents. I stopped counting the exact number of feather strokes I do because my biggest concern is being dialed in.

It isn't going to help you much if you say ok only doing 3 strokes and by the 3rd stroke you aren't dialed in.

So I focus on what I do after I feel I'm dialed in. Then I try and make everything I do the same no matter whose style you like I feel that the dial in point where you know you're on for the shot is the business. Sure works for me.


Hi,

By feather-strokes I mean going back and forth with my cue before hitting.

I have 1 year of billiard under my belt, fast learner, can run racks.

But I have one obsession, I keep thinking about how many time I go back and forth with my cue, usually 2 to 4. Also thinking about the pace and style.

I'm a big fan of Ronnie O'Sullivan's cue action, 90% of the regular shots he's "feathering" 3 times, 1 long, one short and one long. If you know what I mean.

But no matter who I should/n't try to copy, my question is simple:

Should I try, from now, to force myself into having the same type of cue action ? (Ronnie's)

Or should I try to find my own style, during months/years, risking to end up with something not that elegant ? (yes I care about the elegancy of my gesture)
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hi,

By feather-strokes I mean going back and forth with my cue before hitting.

I have 1 year of billiard under my belt, fast learner, can run racks.

But I have one obsession, I keep thinking about how many time I go back and forth with my cue, usually 2 to 4. Also thinking about the pace and style.

I'm a big fan of Ronnie O'Sullivan's cue action, 90% of the regular shots he's "feathering" 3 times, 1 long, one short and one long. If you know what I mean.

But no matter who I should/n't try to copy, my question is simple:

Should I try, from now, to force myself into having the same type of cue action ? (Ronnie's)

Or should I try to find my own style, during months/years, risking to end up with something not that elegant ? (yes I care about the elegancy of my gesture)
Most good players have a consistent pre-shot routine including taking the same number of pre-strokes before they deliver their actual stroke. No different than pro golfers having the same preshot routine (waggles) before they hit the ball, basketball players bouncing the ball the same number of times before a free-throw, baseball players going through the same routine at the plate before the pitch, etc.

Going in to that subconscious pre-shot routine that repeats every time is what helps you know you are locked in and ready to go with your final delivery. For me, my preshot routine starts when I chalk my cue before I even drop down over the ball.

If you get over the ball and take the your normal number of pre-strokes and still aren't feeling confident, it's not likely going to give you any better chance of making the shot by staying over the ball longer and take more and more strokes. Generally, the longer you freeze over the ball, the less chance you are going to make it. You need to get back up and start your entire preshot routine all over. Nothing substitutes for more and more practice, to the point that when you get over the ball, you eventually should feel more confident that you can execute the shot successfully.
 

poolguy4u

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
:smash:



Don't even worry about it.

Just don't hit the cue ball until you know you have the shot lined up right.

When you have it right just shoot.


Just don't worry about how many practice strokes you take.

Heck, I don't even remember if I take any practice strokes at all.

I just shoot 'em in.



:woot:




.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Hi,

By feather-strokes I mean going back and forth with my cue before hitting.

I have 1 year of billiard under my belt, fast learner, can run racks.

But I have one obsession, I keep thinking about how many time I go back and forth with my cue, usually 2 to 4. Also thinking about the pace and style.

I'm a big fan of Ronnie O'Sullivan's cue action, 90% of the regular shots he's "feathering" 3 times, 1 long, one short and one long. If you know what I mean.

But no matter who I should/n't try to copy, my question is simple:

Should I try, from now, to force myself into having the same type of cue action ? (Ronnie's)

Or should I try to find my own style, during months/years, risking to end up with something not that elegant ? (yes I care about the elegancy of my gesture)

i have not read the other posts
and for the record i am not an instructor
but
2-4 "warm up strokes is very acceptable
its the consistency before you pull the trigger that is important
jmho
from someone who has taken lessons from respected instructors
 

Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Robin...This is why we allow ourselves to do another "set" of warmups or feathers, when after stopping the tip at the CB, and your 'brain' isn't "ready". For some difficult shots, someone might repeat this routine a number of times...stopping at the CB (with the tip close) after each set of warmups. Vital to do the same routine, though, no matter what it is. Most people who learn a repeatable PEP find that helps enormously in only needing one set of warmups. When the eyes come up to the OB, it triggers a chemical reaction in the brain (basically "Am I ready...or not?") There is no maybe...maybe means no! The majority of shots will only require one set of warmups or feathers...then look up and go! :grin:

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

Pool is extremely subjective but here's my two cents. I stopped counting the exact number of feather strokes I do because my biggest concern is being dialed in.

It isn't going to help you much if you say ok only doing 3 strokes and by the 3rd stroke you aren't dialed in.

So I focus on what I do after I feel I'm dialed in. Then I try and make everything I do the same no matter whose style you like I feel that the dial in point where you know you're on for the shot is the business. Sure works for me.
 

O'SulliReyes

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just want to share a very good insight by John Parrott during the O'Sullivan vs Murphy match at the recent 2017 UK Championship on how the difficulty of a shot can affect the number of feathers: https://youtu.be/L0NW2cTjFIA?t=2200

A lot of the top pool and snooker players have a unique and consistent feathering style. Just look at John Higgins, Ronnie O'Sullivan, Stephen Hendry and Efren Reyes. I think the reason why Efren Reyes is able to play as well as he does with his loose unorthodox stroke is because not only does he have a consistent feathering style, he also does it in a very rhythmic and distinctive fashion. "Like playing the violin", as Billy Incardona would describe it. Because his stroke is so rhythmic, he is able to vary his number of feathers depending on the difficulty of the shot without affecting accuracy and positional play.

Having a consistent number of feathers is an important part of a good preshot routine. But at the same time, there are some shots that warrant a little bit more respect. In such cases, increasing the number of feathers is fine, but the RHYTHM must be the same. Also, I think one aspect of the game that most people tend to forget but is extremely important is the eye pattern. A good feathering routine must be accompanied by a compatible and consistent eye pattern. Players who are "in the zone" are those whose stroke and eye pattern are in near-perfect sync, allowing them to cue through the white effortlessly.

So to answer your question. If you're really so set on copying someone's feathering style (ie Ronnie O'Sullivan), you will have to look at the big picture: that is, look at his entire preshot routine from his approach to the shot, to right down to his eye pattern while on the shot. However, at the end of the day, no two players are the same. You may start off copying someone's style, but if you want to be the best player you can be, you will have to make technical adjustments to suit your personal style and anatomy.
 
Last edited:

Neil

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you are concentrating on your feather stroke numbers, you are wasting your time. You shouldn't be counting them in game time. You can only concentrate on thing at a time. And if it's how many feather strokes, it isn't aim, speed, and exactly where to hit the cb. Put your focus where it should be and your problem will be solved.

Also, bear in mind that your aren't any one but you. While it's good to incorporate certain things into your game, one should never try and completely copy someone else.
 

Nuts4Tascarellas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Feathers

Don't count your preshot strokes in an actual match. If you want to for the beginning of your practice sessions - that's fine. When you are in a match, the most important thing to do is make your decisions before bending over and getting down on the shot. Don't EVER readjust when you are down! ALL your aiming is done while you approach the shot. Before you get down. While you are down, look over the cue ball at the precise point on the object ball. You should do your pre-strokes and stare at that point. You should not be thinking at this point! You have already made all your decisions prior to this. The shot should be an unconscious action.
That's why you won't be counting strokes. You can't be thinking about how many strokes you are on and be executing the unconscious shot. Try this - it will make you better.
 

jasonlaus

Rep for Smorg
Silver Member
Don't count your preshot strokes in an actual match. If you want to for the beginning of your practice sessions - that's fine. When you are in a match, the most important thing to do is make your decisions before bending over and getting down on the shot. Don't EVER readjust when you are down! ALL your aiming is done while you approach the shot. Before you get down. While you are down, look over the cue ball at the precise point on the object ball. You should do your pre-strokes and stare at that point. You should not be thinking at this point! You have already made all your decisions prior to this. The shot should be an unconscious action.
That's why you won't be counting strokes. You can't be thinking about how many strokes you are on and be executing the unconscious shot. Try this - it will make you better.

This^^^^^^^
Jason
 

336Robin

Multiverse Operative
Gold Member
Silver Member
Interesting reply Scott and thank you. I think you covered the rest of the bases that's for sure. I do recognize that having a specific number of pre stroke movements before you're supposed to be ready to set, pause and fire sort of pushes you to get yourself ready in that time frame and that whole scenario is quite useful. I'm wading in slow. Before I get myself to that state I want to wade in a toe at a time. I know pretty much how I do everything I do and I'm slowing pushing some changes in my stroke and fire routine so by the time I get the changes made they'll feel natural.

I beat a few guys prior to my surgery playing One Pocket that I was surprised I beat. Right now I'd just like to be able to get out and play. I had my foot surgery and am in a cast. So I won't get to hit another ball for at least a month. Cabin fever!.


Robin...This is why we allow ourselves to do another "set" of warmups or feathers, when after stopping the tip at the CB, and your 'brain' isn't "ready". For some difficult shots, someone might repeat this routine a number of times...stopping at the CB (with the tip close) after each set of warmups. Vital to do the same routine, though, no matter what it is. Most people who learn a repeatable PEP find that helps enormously in only needing one set of warmups. When the eyes come up to the OB, it triggers a chemical reaction in the brain (basically "Am I ready...or not?") There is no maybe...maybe means no! The majority of shots will only require one set of warmups or feathers...then look up and go! :grin:

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com
 
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