Pool ball collecting.

jviss

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The Centennials cleaned up very nicely, and I'm super excite that I got a good set for only $20. But, the cleaning experience was weird. Let me explain, so hopefully someone more expert and experienced than me with this may comment and enlighten me as to better techniques.

I changed what I was doing part way through. About the first third I washed each one with some dishwashing detergent (washing-up liquid) and then went to the Aramith Restorer, then Aramith Cleaner. It left a yellow stain on the cotton cloth I was using. I decided to try some citrus-based cleaner, since the Aramith smells like citrus, and this had the same result. Finally, I tried some all-purpose spray cleaner with chlorine, and this made the balls drip yellow into the sink, and no longer stain the cloth yellow. But now my hands are stained yellow!

When I was done I went back the the cue ball. I sprayed it with the chlorine spray, and the ball turned pink! I was in a bit of a panic, and after scrubbing it under the tap it went back to white, and I again used restorer then cleaner, and all was well. (I remember using a chlorine spray on a white shirt once, and it turned pink, but went back to white when it dried. I don't know what causes this.)

So, all is pretty good now, but I'd certainly appreciate some "pro tips" on cleaning billiard balls.

Cheers,

jv

p.s. I put away the Aramith Premier set I have and am now using the Centennials. It may be entirely psychological, but I think they play better. :)
 

mrpoopytime

Registered
That's probably nicotine stains. I recently cleaned a Gold Crown cue rack that was filthy with nicotine and had a similar experience with those yellow stains.

If you search back through this thread, K2 has a post regarding cleaning phenolic resin balls. Basically it comes down to using only the Aramith Cleaner and elbow grease. Use the restorer if necessary and sparingly as it's more aggressive in removing material. Officially I don't think you're supposed to use soap and water, but I've never seen a problem with that. I'd be much more wary of using chlorine or similarly harsh chemicals.
 

jviss

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
That's probably nicotine stains. I recently cleaned a Gold Crown cue rack that was filthy with nicotine and had a similar experience with those yellow stains.

If you search back through this thread, K2 has a post regarding cleaning phenolic resin balls. Basically it comes down to using only the Aramith Cleaner and elbow grease. Use the restorer if necessary and sparingly as it's more aggressive in removing material. Officially I don't think you're supposed to use soap and water, but I've never seen a problem with that. I'd be much more wary of using chlorine or similarly harsh chemicals.
Thanks. I resorted to the citrus cleaner, and then the chlorine, as the cloths was loading up with the yellow stuff. Thought the Aramith products would do a better job with it removed first.
 

mrpoopytime

Registered
You should be fine going straight to the Aramith cleaner, it would probably just take a bit more. I used a diluted white vinegar solution for cleaning up the nicotine stains, safer than chlorine.
 

Geosnookery

Well-known member
on my 6' table, playing 8 ball is already a "traffic jam"
21 would be a pile-up 😬

Had to laugh. I mostly play made up games on my 12 x 6 Snooker table. I often play convoluted Games (too complicated to get into) With 4 sets of American balls. Feels like playing on a bar box until a few balls get pocketed.
 

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jviss

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Had to laugh. I mostly play made up games on my 12 x 6 Snooker table. I often play convoluted Games (too complicated to get into) With 4 sets of American balls. Feels like playing on a bar box until a few balls get pocketed.
Wow, I'm jealous! I'd love to have a 12' snooker table. My room's big, but not that big! How do the 2 1/4" balls work on those rails and pockets?
 

Geosnookery

Well-known member
Wow, I'm jealous! I'd love to have a 12' snooker table. My room's big, but not that big! How do the 2 1/4" balls work on those rails and pockets?
This is my second snooker table over the decades and i’ve never noticed a difference between 2 1/8 and 2/4 balls on the rails. Perhaps there is on some brands but not Dufferin or National.

I had my Snooker pockets cut at 3 3/8 Instead of 3 1/ 2 inch. I prefer a slightly narrower pocket than official tournament size. I find that I get too used to a home table and like a bit more of a challenge.
American size balls sink fine. You learn quickly what shots are possible. Every so often I can run a table using American balls but a rarity. I tend to make up my own games.
 

jviss

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm fortunate enough to live near the only public 12' snooker table in the Northeast U.S. (as far as I can tell). It's a Brunswick, and it has all of the features and style of a Gold Crown. I can't imagine potting 2 1/4" balls, though! (I'm not that good.)

I do have a set of 2 1/4" snooker balls for my own 9' Gold Crown. It's a bit crowded when setting up 15 reds; may back off to ten.

jv
 

Geosnookery

Well-known member
I'm fortunate enough to live near the only public 12' snooker table in the Northeast U.S. (as far as I can tell). It's a Brunswick, and it has all of the features and style of a Gold Crown. I can't imagine potting 2 1/4" balls, though! (I'm not that good.)

I do have a set of 2 1/4" snooker balls for my own 9' Gold Crown. It's a bit crowded when setting up 15 reds; may back off to ten.

jv
What players often forget about Snooker is that you are often not trying to pot a ball when at the table...especially non pos. Yes, it’s much harder to pot a ball but it’s like being at the plate in baseball. Maybe swing at every third pitch.

Six red ball is a fairly common Snooker game. It’s on the World Snooker tour circuit.

this , however is just a fun invitational. Ronnie would normally not try for that red in his first shot rather but rather bring the cueball back to his end.

 

ibuycues

I Love Box Cues
Silver Member
OK, here’s my problem:

Several years ago (8-10), I bought an antique set of small (1 3/8”) clay snooker balls.
Rare enough, wanted to display on a small 1934 Billiardette pool table I have.
The set was missing the brown ball, so I thought I would just find/buy one.
.........nope, still looking years later.
Any ideas or help? I’m a buyer!
Thanks!

Will Prout
 

jviss

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What players often forget about Snooker is that you are often not trying to pot a ball when at the table...especially non pos. Yes, it’s much harder to pot a ball but it’s like being at the plate in baseball. Maybe swing at every third pitch.

Six red ball is a fairly common Snooker game. It’s on the World Snooker tour circuit.

this , however is just a fun invitational. Ronnie would normally not try for that red in his first shot rather but rather bring the cueball back to his end.

Thanks! Wow, I didn't know 6 red ball was a thing! Can you get a rack for the six balls? (Or just use the regular triangle rack, I suppose.)
 
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jviss

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
OK, here’s my problem:

Several years ago (8-10), I bought an antique set of small (1 3/8”) clay snooker balls.
Rare enough, wanted to display on a small 1934 Billiardette pool table I have.
The set was missing the brown ball, so I thought I would just find/buy one.
.........nope, still looking years later.
Any ideas or help? I’m a buyer!
Thanks!

Will Prout
I would think it wouldn't be too tough to fabricate one, though I haven't researched it (yet).
 

forabeer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So I picked up this set of 2-1/8" pool balls at the local antique mall for $20. Nice find I thought.
Geosnookery mentioned he liked to invent his own games. Here is mine . . . solo practice game.

Rack the table as shown.
-Free break from the kitchen using 2-1/4" cue ball to 2-1/4" full rack.
-2-1/4" balls worth 1pt. (15 total)
-2-1/8" balls worth 2pts.(30 total)
-Knocking either cue ball in with the other cue ball worth 5pts.
-Highest possible "break" = 50 points
-BALLS HAVE TO BE MADE WITH SAME SIZE CUE BALL (challenging little practice game)
smallballs.jpg
new_game.jpg


Fun.
 

alphadog

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What players often forget about Snooker is that you are often not trying to pot a ball when at the table...especially non pos. Yes, it’s much harder to pot a ball but it’s like being at the plate in baseball. Maybe swing at every third pitch.

Six red ball is a fairly common Snooker game. It’s on the World Snooker tour circuit.

this , however is just a fun invitational. Ronnie would normally not try for that red in his first shot rather but rather bring the cueball back to his end.

I have to disagree about Rocket's attempt. He shoots that shot holding for the black on all days ending in "y".
 

Geosnookery

Well-known member
I have to disagree about Rocket's attempt. He shoots that shot holding for the black on all days ending in "y".
Ronnie is showing off.

Miss that shot and not account for returning to the bulk and he loses to a pro player. They would Clean up. Miss that shot to this lass and he knows at most she many squeeze a couple of points out. It’s the same later when she First fouls on the colours. Ronnie doesn’t make her reshoot.
 

Geosnookery

Well-known member
Thank you. I found what appear to be Brunswick Centennials in a Harvard box. Going to pick them up now.

I’ve learned this over the year’s. I get older ball sets that have been donated to the thrift stores.

What I ‘guess‘ happens is someone gets a new set of balls. They put the old balls in the new box and store them somewhere. When the person passes or whatever they are cleared out with the other ‘stuff’.

an aside: I always check to make sure it’s a full set and there’s not an odd ball to make up a full set. Most commonly missing is the ‘8’ ball...likely removed and used in other ways.
 

jviss

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’ve learned this over the year’s. I get older ball sets that have been donated to the thrift stores.

What I ‘guess‘ happens is someone gets a new set of balls. They put the old balls in the new box and store them somewhere. When the person passes or whatever they are cleared out with the other ‘stuff’.

an aside: I always check to make sure it’s a full set and there’s not an odd ball to make up a full set. Most commonly missing is the ‘8’ ball...likely removed and used in other ways.
Yes, I think that's what happens, too. I often see a set of cheap balls in a box from a good set, but rarely the other way around. Why would someone replace a decent set of Centennials with a set of Harvards?
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... . Ronnie would normally not try for that red in his first shot rather but rather bring the cueball back to his end.
I can't believe you're saying this. Ronnie would play that shot every time it came up. By your remark I have to conclude that you know nothing about pro level snooker players. Not only Ronnie, but everyone in the top 128 would play that shot.

What a strange remark.
 
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