Question about shooting fast and shooting slow......

JayRack

Member
I had a pro level player tell me recently that I could play but I shot too fast. I've always played and shot fast. Any of you guys that use to play fast and changed to a slower more methodical approach improve a lot? Did slowing down enhance your game? I also can't get into a good rhythm when playing a slow player. I'm sure this subject has been broached but I'm new here.
 

poolguy4u

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I had a pro level player tell me recently that I could play but I shot too fast. I've always played and shot fast. Any of you guys that use to play fast and changed to a slower more methodical approach improve a lot? Did slowing down enhance your game? I also can't get into a good rhythm when playing a slow player. I'm sure this subject has been broached but I'm new here.
When I was younger I always played fast. I made more money that way. I always had customers waiting to play next.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I had a pro level player tell me recently that I could play but I shot too fast. I've always played and shot fast. Any of you guys that use to play fast and changed to a slower more methodical approach improve a lot? Did slowing down enhance your game? I also can't get into a good rhythm when playing a slow player. I'm sure this subject has been broached but I'm new here.
Everybody has their own pace and you have to find the pace that works for you. As long as a fast paced player is still exhibiting good fundamentals, a good smooth stroke and staying down and still through the stroke, the amount of time one takes between shots is not that critical. Some players can see what they need to do extremely quickly and others are just way more deliberate and are comfortable taking much more time planning out the shot and where they want the cue ball to end up, and the spin and speed necessary to get it there, even before they even begin their pre-shot routine over the ball.

My pace is on the slower side, but I will say this - A fast pace player may be able to get in twice or more as many shots per hour in their practice sessions as a slow paced player. Over the long haul, that could be extremely valuable in shortening the number of years it takes them to reach their potential.
 
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alphadog

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I play very fast and I know I need to slow down. I see the table and react. Problem is sometimes I fail to see if that ball really goes in clean or if I need to play it off a ball-or if it can only be made from a certain angle. Some shots are tricky to get the cueball to a desired position from and over looking that makes it darn hard to get from the 5 to the 6. Shooting fast isn't the problem-playing too fast is.
 

JayRack

Member
Another thing i thought about this morning is I shoot much faster on a bar box. On a 9 foot I measure shots and angles and I'm a little more deliberate. On a bar box I run and gun without much hesitation. Maybe a lot of players are like that.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Exactly. If the guys still around you might go back and ask him what he specifically meant by that. Where exactly is the "fast" occurring.
Two of our top players here are extremely slow paced but in different ways. One of them takes a ridiculous amount of time walking around the table and planning before he ever gets over it, but is relatively quick once he gets down over the ball. The other one gets over the ball relatively quickly, but takes forever to pull the trigger.

I find it difficult playing either one of them to the point that I try not watching them when I’m sitting in the chair, at least until they pull the trigger. The best way to deal with them is to not let them get to the table.
 

ShootingArts

Smorg is giving St Peter the 7!
Gold Member
Silver Member
How fast or slow your play needs to be is determined by why you miss a ball. Did you miss the ball because of poor mechanics or was your pattern less than optimal? Usually when a good player misses after making a couple balls it is because he made a mistake earlier. The player saying you play to fast probably saw you making planning errors. Of course you have to consider the possibility he is wrong too, but a good chance he isn't. An observer often sees better than the person at the table.

When I was a teen I gambled with a man that was in his seventies, maybe eighties. Joe was very slow moving around the table, he shot so slow that the balls never lost contact with the bevel going in a pocket. Glaciers were speedburners compared to Joe. He could run out, and take fifteen minutes doing it without stalling. He was just that slow. The slower he seemed to play the faster I played. I sat on the edge of my chair or stool and jumped up as soon as he missed. In my rush I would miss a ball or blow shape then the torture began again. I wouldn't duck Joe but I gave him the money I had won from better players.

After several months of Joe beating me unmercifully I hit on a simple move. No more edge of the chair, I sat in the chair, leaned back, maybe propped a foot up. I watched Joe like a mildly interested observer. When he missed, I got up an ambled up to the table. Joe never beat me again. More importantly he taught me how to deal with slow players of all types. When people ask about mentors I always include Joe although he surely didn't mean to be one! It isn't exaggerating at all to say my dealings with Joe that cost me a few hundred and some pride made me thousands in the next seven or eight years. Any time somebody slow played me I would just sit deep in my chair, make a point of taking a swallow of beer when they missed, then get up slowly and go shoot.

Hu
 

JayRack

Member
Excellent thought. Ran into this situation the other night. I spent all my time at the EDGE of the chair , eager in anticipation. Great reply sir. This is spot on. The next time I play this guy I'm going to mentally and physically pump the breaks.
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
Everybody has their own pace and you have to find the pace that works for you. As long as a fast paced player is still exhibiting good fundamentals, a good smooth stroke and staying down and still through the stroke, the amount of time one takes between shots is not that critical. Some players can see what they need to do extremely quickly and others are just way more deliberate and are comfortable taking much more time planning out the shot and where they want the cue ball to end up, and the spin and speed necessary to get it there, even before they even begin their pre-shot routine over the ball.

My pace is on the slower side, but I will say this - A fast pace player may be able to get in twice or more as many shots per hour in their practice sessions as a slow paced player. Over the long haul, that could be extremely valuable in shortening the number of years it takes them to reach their potential.
This is the best answer from a guy that knows. Lou Butera may have been the fastest player ever and he's in the Hall of Fame. You have to find the pace that works for you, that's all.
 

longhorns2

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
He probably meant you were good at potting balls but you weren't thinking long enough to play good patterns. I think playing fast is fine and actually preferable if you're in a good rhythm, but you still need to make the game easy on yourself by coming up with an easy pattern.

That being said, we've all been beaten by the guy who just shoots and banks without thinking, partly because they are shooting confidently, not overthinking and not doubting themselves. I think this is why a lot of people say they play better when they're drinking. But in the long run, it's better to think it out a little bit and then get in a good rhythm.
 

drop_pocket

New member
My pace is on the slower side, but I will say this - A fast pace player may be able to get in twice or more as many shots per hour in their practice sessions as a slow paced player. Over the long haul, that could be extremely valuable in shortening the number of years it takes them to reach their potential.

Interesting point. As a slow player, I never considered that.

It may be the case that the slow pace player learns twice as much from each shot. Or not.

I'll experiment with playing faster in the next few practice session and see what happens.
 

philly

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
There is a difference between an extremely slow player and a deliberate player.
I have found that extremely slow players often, not always, are slow because they really have no idea what they are looking at.
A deliberate player knows what they are looking at and are deciding the best way to get where they want to go.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Pace of play is completely different from playing so fast that one does not complete the pre shot routine to obtain the best results. I have a feeling that perhaps what the pro level player was trying to tell you is that he noticed you were not "sighting" the shots in the standing position to the degree needed to go down into the true line of the shot properly- thus , perhaps you showed some inconsistencies in making more difficult shots - sometimes looking great and other times missing an equally difficult shot.

i would suggest reviewing in your mind just how you decide on all the elements of a shot while standing- aim, speed, spin, stroke - and making sure that you are coming to complete decisions on all four elements prior to getting down to shoot- and doing so with conviction. if you find that one or more pieces are lacking a bit- work on it by taking a little more time prior to getting into the shooting position - over time, if you see results from some slight changes in your approach to each shot, and if you play enough- several times a week- your natural pace and rhythm should take over again- it may be fast again, but just more complete- Best of Luck!

The other area where too fast a pace can be harmful is in the stroke itself- that is a timing issue- when someone is too anxious at times and is letting the cue stick move into the cue ball without being "locked" on the OB aiming point to a sufficient degree. I would look at the pre shot routine first- make sure it is working right for you- conviction in the pre shot routine phase helps to overcome rushed stroke syndrome. if you still see some issues, strive for more consistency as well by slowing the stroke a bit as you remain locked on the OB contact point.
 
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