Speed Control Drills

strmanglr scott

All about Focus
Silver Member
The main stream of original drills are great for improvement, no doubt. The problem is some has shot these same drills thousands of times and they lose substance. Like having sex with the same woman for over 20 years. You love them, but skipping a night or two is the norm at that point. Changing things up at times keeps the mind creative, keeps interest and you at the practice table longer.

This is so true, I need some strange.:cool::grin:
 

KenRobbins

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
One of the features of progressive practice drills is that they remain challenging and put you at the edge of your comfort zone. Lots of drills fail in that regard. Also, you never shoot exactly the same shot twice in a row.

You and Dr Dave's drills eliminate that and are excellent. Checkbilliard.com is also an excellent site for progressive drills also if anyone don't know about that already.
 

KenRobbins

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Recently divorced after 25 years :thumbup:

Sorry to hear that. Now you have more time for drills and can hit the road at will. Trying to stay in top form in pool and being married is tough, like having two wives. Is their an instructor out there that can train my wife on how to let me play pool? lol
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Up above I mentioned an exercise for developing the low-speed end of speed control (as many soft shots as possible to make a ball across the table). Here are three more drills to develop such control:

Place ten or so object balls along the head string. Hit the object balls directly with your cue stick as if each one was a cue ball. Hit the first one very softly towards the foot rail. Hit each additional ball so that it goes just beyond the last one you hit. See how many you can do without ever getting to the far cushion. If you do it right you will end up with a diagonal line of balls at the end. Here is a typical result with a failure on the 10 ball:

CropperCapture[285].png

Same line up but this time you have cue ball in hand on each shot and are shooting each object ball an increasing distance.

Finally, place balls anywhere out of the kitchen. For each shot take cue ball in hand behind the line and shoot to just touch one of the object balls. The cue ball must remain within a short distance of the ball you hit (a fist, a hand span, one ball -- you pick it). You can continue until all the balls are on the far rail. This drill is also a good way to find out if the table is level.:smile:
 

kevoka

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Up above I mentioned an exercise for developing the low-speed end of speed control (as many soft shots as possible to make a ball across the table). Here are three more drills to develop such control:

Place ten or so object balls along the head string. Hit the object balls directly with your cue stick as if each one was a cue ball. Hit the first one very softly towards the foot rail. Hit each additional ball so that it goes just beyond the last one you hit. See how many you can do without ever getting to the far cushion. If you do it right you will end up with a diagonal line of balls at the end. Here is a typical result with a failure on the 10 ball:

This is an interesting one.

I could see next level would be to drill using all follow, and then using nothing but draw strokes, and finally then to alternate draw and follow.
 

KenRobbins

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Up above I mentioned an exercise for developing the low-speed end of speed control (as many soft shots as possible to make a ball across the table). Here are three more drills to develop such control:

Place ten or so object balls along the head string. Hit the object balls directly with your cue stick as if each one was a cue ball. Hit the first one very softly towards the foot rail. Hit each additional ball so that it goes just beyond the last one you hit. See how many you can do without ever getting to the far cushion. If you do it right you will end up with a diagonal line of balls at the end. Here is a typical result with a failure on the 10 ball:

View attachment 517208

Same line up but this time you have cue ball in hand on each shot and are shooting each object ball an increasing distance.

Finally, place balls anywhere out of the kitchen. For each shot take cue ball in hand behind the line and shoot to just touch one of the object balls. The cue ball must remain within a short distance of the ball you hit (a fist, a hand span, one ball -- you pick it). You can continue until all the balls are on the far rail. This drill is also a good way to find out if the table is level.:smile:

I already know my table isn't level, all 3 pieces of my slate is warped and the seams are popped on both ends.

I'll set that up in the next couple days and try it.

This is one of my favorite speed control drills and for draw control just do it in reverse.
 

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Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... This is one of my favorite speed control drills ... .
The follow drill says to have at least two diamonds between the cue ball and object ball. That lets the table put a significant amount of follow on the cue ball if it doesn't start with full follow. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but it is also good to practice follow shots where you have to put the follow on the ball yourself, namely where the distance to the object ball is shorter, like one diamond.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I already know my table isn't level, all 3 pieces of my slate is warped and the seams are popped on both ends. ...
I learned on a table where to shoot a spot shot at medium speed you aimed full ball. That was from the right side. You could also make a ball frozen to that side cushion in that same side pocket if your speed was good. I don't think I'd want to play the "hit the far ball softly" drill on that table.
 

KenRobbins

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The follow drill says to have at least two diamonds between the cue ball and object ball. That lets the table put a significant amount of follow on the cue ball if it doesn't start with full follow. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but it is also good to practice follow shots where you have to put the follow on the ball yourself, namely where the distance to the object ball is shorter, like one diamond.

Yes, that's how it says how to do it. If you want to practice one diamond away, move the cue ball one diamond away or wherever you want. But then that would be considered a cookie cutter drill. LOL
 

KenRobbins

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I learned on a table where to shoot a spot shot at medium speed you aimed full ball. That was from the right side. You could also make a ball frozen to that side cushion in that same side pocket if your speed was good. I don't think I'd want to play the "hit the far ball softly" drill on that table.

No you wouldn't want to shoot a soft spot shot on my table, after enough tries you'd end up in the state hospital. lol

I want to put a new floor in my pool room, then I can get me a new table. Just need the time to do it with everything else I got going on.
 

Chili Palmer

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Sorry to hear that. Now you have more time for drills and can hit the road at will. Trying to stay in top form in pool and being married is tough, like having two wives. Is their an instructor out there that can train my wife on how to let me play pool? lol

LOL, she got the furniture and I now have a pool table in my living room :grin:

I also got my daughter to join league and I am teaching my 7 year old granddaughter how to play. Pool will be a part of her life if she likes it or not :grin-square:
 

Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
PJ...Of course they do, but the first thing required to gain speed control is learning to swing the the cuestick accurately for all speeds (1-10). After that it is quite simple to gauge speed by learning speed tradeoff (how much speed stays on the CB after contact, via how much OB you hit.

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com

Do the Mother Drills cover CB speed after contact with OBs? Seems to me that's what's needed.

pj
chgo
 

Meucciplayer

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Last night I enjoyed some training at a local club. Two of us were sharing a table. The instructor had us do the following which I considered to be fun.

Set up the 16 balls of a full rack (including whitey) on a horizontal line on the first diamond of the long rail. Shoot one ball after the other towards the other end of the table, and make them rest within the 2 last diamonds. They can't contact another ball and should not cross the line of the 2nd diamond after a possible rebound from the end rail. We had some fun trying to block each other's side and made a "training game" of it. Once it is not challenging enough any more change the landing zone or add more balls.

Nice little easy drill for a change. Probably even better on a small table in this case.
 
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