table style

whammo57

Kim Walker
Silver Member
does anyone else notice that the commercial style table.... gold crown or diamond...... play better than the furniture style that are sold for homes?... to me the furniture style seem dead off the rails............

Kim
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
does anyone else notice that the commercial style table.... gold crown or diamond...... play better than the furniture style that are sold for homes?... to me the furniture style seem dead off the rails............

Kim
Of course. Gold Crowns and Diamond commercial models are more stoutly built from the base, frame and rails.
 

Texas Carom Club

play 1cushion & balkline
Silver Member
Maybe your simply more accustomed to how commercial tables play , being as they don't have home model tables at the pool rooms .

But also agree they're more rigid and sturdy all around, the commercial tables
 
Last edited:

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I had an American Heritage Independence model. It banked very well. But it did have the rails bolted directly down to the slate. Never had an issues develop.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Olhausen home tables- mostly furniture style- never played anywhere near as fast as a Diamond or Gold Crown - no matter what cloth you put on the Olhausen, using their stock rails. what makes matters even worse is that their pocket design at Olhausen was even less conducive to accepting a properly struck ball at a higher speed - so you have to hit the balls harder on an Olhausen bc the tables are slow and then you get screwed by their infamous pocket rattle between the pocket facings- not a good design.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Rail height affects speed off the rails as well - I am not a table mechanic by any means- but furniture style pool tables appear, at least to have lower rail height, so the ball has less forward roll as it comes off the rail. I may be wrong on this- but it just looks that way whenever I play on a furniture style table. I know that when I look at the available cue ball to hit off a rail shot on a furniture style table there seems to be more CB area available than on a commercial table such as a Diamond.
 
Last edited:

Banger

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not uncommon to have cheap rubber on the rails of furniture style tables. I had a Brunswick furniture style table, and the rubber turned hard as a rock, after a few years. It was like trying to bank a ball off of a 2 x 4 piece of lumber.
 

BobTfromIL

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Olhausen home tables- mostly furniture style- never played anywhere near as fast as a Diamond or Gold Crown - no matter what cloth you put on the Olhausen, using their stock rails. what makes matters even worse is that their pocket design at Olhausen was even less conducive to accepting a properly struck ball at a higher speed - so you have to hit the balls harder on an Olhausen bc the tables are slow and then you get screwed by their infamous pocket rattle between the pocket facings- not a good design.
Agree with what you said, we have Olhausen tables in one of our Rec rooms and while I don't know of they are commercial or home models they do play as you described. Good news are they are in the process of being replaced by Pro AM Diamonds.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
The cushions on the home tables are usually a lower tier than the commercial tables. Even within Bruswick's line, for example, they only use the Superspeed on the commercial and the top tier home tables. The lower tables have a lower tier of cushion. For the Chinese import tables that are today probably most common for home tables, I've seen the cushions on those go completely dead and the ball thuds off of the cushion. But that usually takes 5 or 10 years, not when new. I don't know if you are describing a new table, or an older table where the rubber has deteriorated over time. Home tables also have thinner slate and are generally lighter weight. All the tiny motions of the balls rolling and the balls hitting the rail get dissipated by those lighter weight/thickness materials vibrating. The heavier/thicker materials will vibrate less, and keep more energy on the ball. This will make the ball roll further. There of course is a point of diminishing returns. A 5" thick slate might not be noticeably better than a 2" thick slate. But a 1" thick on a commercial table is probably noticeably better to a thinner slate on a home table.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Agree with what you said, we have Olhausen tables in one of our Rec rooms and while I don't know of they are commercial or home models they do play as you described. Good news are they are in the process of being replaced by Pro AM Diamonds.
Great to have a rec room replace such tables. Right now, for me, I am stuck with a couple of 9 foot Olhausen's at the most convenient place for me to play - Naples, Fl real estate is just too expensive for anyone to make money renting out table time with a new room.
 
Top