Training Device with Immediate Feedback

JeremiahGage

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
How beneficial do you think it would be to have a wearable device that gives instant feedback on your stroke?

For example, you get a small vibration if you twist your wrist, or a sound if your backstroke was jerky. You could also store the data from a number of strokes to analyze your consistency.

And if such a device already exists, I want to know about it!
 

prad

Flip the coin
Silver Member
How beneficial do you think it would be to have a wearable device that gives instant feedback on your stroke?

For example, you get a small vibration if you twist your wrist, or a sound if your backstroke was jerky. You could also store the data from a number of strokes to analyze your consistency.

And if such a device already exists, I want to know about it!

This might be the closed thing in the market :- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VjNU7pQnwaI
 

slach

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
QMD (www.cue-md.com) does just what your asking for. If you're using it with a smartphone you could stick it in your pocket and get a vibration the instant your stroke goes off-line.



How beneficial do you think it would be to have a wearable device that gives instant feedback on your stroke?

For example, you get a small vibration if you twist your wrist, or a sound if your backstroke was jerky. You could also store the data from a number of strokes to analyze your consistency.

And if such a device already exists, I want to know about it!
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
QMD (www.cue-md.com) does just what your asking for. If you're using it with a smartphone you could stick it in your pocket and get a vibration the instant your stroke goes off-line.

I think that is the only one out there for this. Been trying to get one for our junior league but have not gotten one ordered yet.
 

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This one would work better. You need something with positive reinforcement.
Attach a cattle prod to your nut sack. Every time you miss, you get the "reinforcement"!
 

Cardigan Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This one would work better. You need something with positive reinforcement.
Attach a cattle prod to your nut sack. Every time you miss, you get the "reinforcement"!

ha ha like that student at the beginning of Ghostbusters. Get it wrong and you are losing your gum from the shock. ha ha
 

Colin Colenso

<-- My Kids
Silver Member
I'll wait for a device that beeps or lights up or vibrates to tell me when my bridge V is on the required line of shot.

As I mentioned in another thread, there are ways to reduce the effect of stroking errors and I don't think it's particularly hard to stroke well enough to make most intended shots. And I don't think we need to track velocity and acceleration data to recognize a controlled smooth stroke; a video camera does a fine job.

Imho, these devices are mainly to increase instructor's incomes, not to improve player's games significantly. In fact, it may lead many to paralysis by irrelevant analysis.

Colin
 
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Mirza

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'll wait for a device that beeps or lights up or vibrates to tell me when my bridge V is on the required line of shot.

As I mentioned in another thread, there are ways to reduce the effect of stroking errors and I don't think it's particularly hard to stroke well enough to make most intended shots. And I don't think we need to track velocity and acceleration data to recognize a controlled smooth stroke; a video camera does a fine job.

Imho, these devices are mainly to increase instructor's incomes, not to improve player's games significantly. In fact, it may lead many to paralysis by irrelevant analysis.

Colin

Very well said, I agree 100%!!!! :thumbup:
 

mristea

Pool maniac
Silver Member
I'll wait for a device that beeps or lights up or vibrates to tell me when my bridge V is on the required line of shot.

As I mentioned in another thread, there are ways to reduce the effect of stroking errors and I don't think it's particularly hard to stroke well enough to make most intended shots. And I don't think we need to track velocity and acceleration data to recognize a controlled smooth stroke; a video camera does a fine job.

Imho, these devices are mainly to increase instructor's incomes, not to improve player's games significantly. In fact, it may lead many to paralysis by irrelevant analysis.

Colin

Hi Colin,
You're absolutely right regarding the importance of the V bridge placement.
When I'm not in stroke, I carefully visualize the shot line from above, in order to be sure I place the V on that line.
But tell you what - in fact I'm sure you are well aware of this :) - if your visual alignment is correct, and you get down on the shot keeping the same eye position as above - the bridge places itself automatically on the correct line...and this is in fact what happens when we are "in stroke"...
 

Colin Colenso

<-- My Kids
Silver Member
Hi Colin,
You're absolutely right regarding the importance of the V bridge placement.
When I'm not in stroke, I carefully visualize the shot line from above, in order to be sure I place the V on that line.
But tell you what - in fact I'm sure you are well aware of this :) - if your visual alignment is correct, and you get down on the shot keeping the same eye position as above - the bridge places itself automatically on the correct line...and this is in fact what happens when we are "in stroke"...
That sure is a nice feeling, but seems to require a lot of practice for me to get into it regularly. When it does click, my brain simply thinks about how good I'm gonna get whitey on the next shot. :)
 

midnightpulp

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'll wait for a device that beeps or lights up or vibrates to tell me when my bridge V is on the required line of shot.

As I mentioned in another thread, there are ways to reduce the effect of stroking errors and I don't think it's particularly hard to stroke well enough to make most intended shots. And I don't think we need to track velocity and acceleration data to recognize a controlled smooth stroke; a video camera does a fine job.

Imho, these devices are mainly to increase instructor's incomes, not to improve player's games significantly. In fact, it may lead many to paralysis by irrelevant analysis.

Colin

Yep. I'm once again getting back into the game after another long layoff. Had no problem getting my stroke back rather quickly.

On that note, I also think pool players make too big a deal about "aiming," as well. I've been playing a lot of Virtual Pool lately, a game where you always have perfect stroke, sighting, and alignment, and my aiming is rock solid. I also think many above C players underestimate their aiming as well as their stroke.

What's most difficult to keep consistent, for me at least, is sighting, alignment, sighting, alignment, rinse and repeat.

I'm not speaking absolutely, but I think sighting and alignment issues are what cause us the most grief, and are often blamed on a bad stroke or bad aiming. Your stroke is probably good, you're just not sighting the center of the cue ball correctly and probably aligning yourself askew of your aim point. Or you align yourself correctly, but your subconscious "pulls" you into steering the shot.

I can't count how many times I address center ball on a cut shot, looked at the object ball, and then when I look back at the cue ball, I've drifted a half tip to the outside (I think this is because of how often we use outside English in pool on cut shots, our muscle memory forces us outside against our will).
 

buckshotshoey

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'll wait for a device that beeps or lights up or vibrates to tell me when my bridge V is on the required line of shot.

As I mentioned in another thread, there are ways to reduce the effect of stroking errors and I don't think it's particularly hard to stroke well enough to make most intended shots. And I don't think we need to track velocity and acceleration data to recognize a controlled smooth stroke; a video camera does a fine job.

Imho, these devices are mainly to increase instructor's incomes, not to improve player's games significantly. In fact, it may lead many to paralysis by irrelevant analysis.

Colin

Ah, come on, try my idea. You are guaranteed what the title asks for.....
INSTANT FEEDBACK!
 

Skippy27

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
QMD (www.cue-md.com) does just what your asking for. If you're using it with a smartphone you could stick it in your pocket and get a vibration the instant your stroke goes off-line.

I did not find this to be worth the price or provide consistent usable feedback. It could be me, but I spent a couple hours playing around with it and haven't used it since.
 

JoeyA

Efren's Mini-Tourn BACKER
Silver Member
Intel

INTC, plans on installing their fingernail size computer chips into just about everything in the next 10 years. There are some links about this, I just don't have them handy.

The chips will be used in almost anything to keep track of, provide feedback on, compute this and that. From t-shirts to pool cues. :smile:

I have to imagine that the cue manufacturers will be all over this. The possibilities are only limited by your imagination.

JoeyA
 

Sloppy Pockets

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
How beneficial do you think it would be to have a wearable device that gives instant feedback on your stroke?

For example, you get a small vibration if you twist your wrist, or a sound if your backstroke was jerky. You could also store the data from a number of strokes to analyze your consistency.

And if such a device already exists, I want to know about it!

This is the best device known for getting accurate feedback on your stroke:
 

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