Using white glue for leather wraps?

cbi1000

It is what it is...
Silver Member
So I installed anther leather wrap over the weekend and as usual I used contract cement. However this time I had a tough time fighting the cc. Didn't want to setup correctly, not sure if it was the cc, they thinner, the humidity, or everything. Not to mention the smell. Anyway, I remember reading somewhere that some folks use white clue to install leather wraps.

Thoughts on the topic? Pro's and con's? Tips and tricks?

thanks!
 

RickLafayette

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
wood glue.jpg

This is what you want to use. I am not a cue maker. Many years ago I did leather carving for a local saddle maker and this is what he used to attach the leather panels to the wood saddle frame. Those saddles would sometimes get soaked in the rain and the leather never slipped.
 

Dave38

theemperorhasnoclotheson
Silver Member
A couple questions, how old its the glue SINCE you first opened it? Is there a lot of space for air in the can? What is the wood the handle is made from? Some woods need to be washed down with denatured alcohol first. Was this a brand new cue or did you replace the wrap on a cue? If replacing, I found that you have to remove ALL traces of the old glue as some contact cements do not play well with others and will leave it soft, and will move around. Learned that first while doing pool tables after someone used spray CC and I use brushed on weldwood. You also mentioned thinner? If you are thinning the contact cement, that is going to have an effect on dry time at the very least, if not the grab of it also.
Dave
 
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Mcues

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
White glue gives you a little more time to accommodate the leather.

Mario
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Hard to beat plain ole white elmers glue for ease of chemical free application for applying leather to wood. You will not get any better looking seams and end channels once you figure it out. There is a slight learning curve but the water clean up is a breeze when you get a little excess on the finish. No taping off bs, breathing deadly chems either.
:wink:
 

Duane Remick

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Hard to beat plain ole white elmers glue for ease of chemical free application for applying leather to wood. You will not get any better looking seams and end channels once you figure it out. There is a slight learning curve but the water clean up is a breeze when you get a little excess on the finish. No taping off bs, breathing deadly chems either.
:wink:

This is great information....
I had no idea the wood glue is used for the leather wrap installs versus contact cement-
Will elmers last as long as the contact cement ????????
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This is great information....
I had no idea the wood glue is used for the leather wrap installs versus contact cement-
Will elmers last as long as the contact cement ????????

Wood glue ?
Try school children Elmer's white glue.
Using white glue makes the installation of leather different from the videos you see using CC.
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
Xz9O3Sk.jpg


This is what I use titebond wood glue for. Seamless transition at the two mating parts. (disclaimer: may not work with all materials)

In the mid 2000's I had the pleasure of being at an east coast FL builders shop. While I was there we were looking over some of his work and I asked the question "how did you make the seam to, seemingly disappear and get the end channels so perfect on this leather wrap?" I'll give you the same three word answer I was told...Elmers white glue. The only other thing that was said about it was his suggestion to make sure you don't use too much water on the seam when doing your clean up. After seeing with my own two eyes I knew what was now possible.
I'll pass that along to you because it was the only outside help I received on subject. The only other thing I did was figured out a way to cut the leather wrap seam and end channel length to size with a perfect fit before gluing it in. Makes thing so much easier on the installation side cause your not fighting with a wrap jig during the gluing process.
As far as longevity, the only complaint I've ever received from anyone was someone trying to remove my wrap. Wanted to know what the heck I used to glue it down with? I just told him I don't install my wraps to be easily removed. ;)
Learning to remove the wrap glued with white glue is another challenge for another day.
 

cueman

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Xz9O3Sk.jpg


This is what I use titebond wood glue for. Seamless transition at the two mating parts. (disclaimer: may not work with all materials)

In the mid 2000's I had the pleasure of being at an east coast FL builders shop. While I was there we were looking over some of his work and I asked the question "how did you make the seam to, seemingly disappear and get the end channels so perfect on this leather wrap?" I'll give you the same three word answer I was told...Elmers white glue. The only other thing that was said about it was his suggestion to make sure you don't use too much water on the seam when doing your clean up. After seeing with my own two eyes I knew what was now possible.
I'll pass that along to you because it was the only outside help I received on subject. The only other thing I did was figured out a way to cut the leather wrap seam and end channel length to size with a perfect fit before gluing it in. Makes thing so much easier on the installation side cause your not fighting with a wrap jig during the gluing process.
As far as longevity, the only complaint I've ever received from anyone was someone trying to remove my wrap. Wanted to know what the heck I used to glue it down with? I just told him I don't install my wraps to be easily removed. ;)
Learning to remove the wrap glued with white glue is another challenge for another day.

I used wood glue and white glue on some of my early wraps. I also tried wrapping with tape and paper then cut the seam and use as a template. Then I figured out how to cut each side of the seam separately with a guide and abandoned the paper template. I also started using contact cement.
 

BarenbruggeCues

Unregistered User
Silver Member
I used wood glue and white glue on some of my early wraps. I also tried wrapping with tape and paper then cut the seam and use as a template. Then I figured out how to cut each side of the seam separately with a guide and abandoned the paper template. I also started using contact cement.

No paper templates here...or any type of template for that matter. Cutting the seam one side at a time and not trying to cut it with an overlap is paramount. I've been doing this using the unique wrap magic fixture I got from you. One of the best cue work investments I've ever made. Built like a tank and works like the energizer bunny. ;)
 

CuesRus1973

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So I installed anther leather wrap over the weekend and as usual I used contract cement. However this time I had a tough time fighting the cc. Didn't want to setup correctly, not sure if it was the cc, they thinner, the humidity, or everything. Not to mention the smell. Anyway, I remember reading somewhere that some folks use white clue to install leather wraps.

Thoughts on the topic? Pro's and con's? Tips and tricks?

thanks!

I've never heard of using white glue for leather, but there is little better than white glue for linen. I could be wrong, often I am, but I don't think it would hold leather very well at all.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've never heard of using white glue for leather, but there is little better than white glue for linen. I could be wrong, often I am, but I don't think it would hold leather very well at all.

It's so strong, it would pull purpleheart and chip it.
 

rhinobywilhite

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've never heard of using white glue for leather, but there is little better than white glue for linen. I could be wrong, often I am, but I don't think it would hold leather very well at all.

Try it.You will never question its holding ability after it has completely dried.

It works great.
 

Canadian cue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When I first started doing leather wraps I would use white glue, it has some interesting working qualities. One method of application is to use it the same way as contact cement in that you can coat both mating surfaces and let it dry, To activate the glue you can use an iron and iron on the leather. I eventually switched to contact cement for two reasons. One is that the water in the glue soaks into the leather making it stretchy and also can mess with finish side of the leather. The other reason is it's a ***** to take off a wrap when it needs to be replaced. Having said that you can great results with both.
 

Mcues

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
If you apply too much white glue to both sides or thin the glue with too much water it brings about the negative results you've described. :)

Mario
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When I first started doing leather wraps I would use white glue, it has some interesting working qualities. One method of application is to use it the same way as contact cement in that you can coat both mating surfaces and let it dry, To activate the glue you can use an iron and iron on the leather. I eventually switched to contact cement for two reasons. One is that the water in the glue soaks into the leather making it stretchy and also can mess with finish side of the leather. The other reason is it's a ***** to take off a wrap when it needs to be replaced. Having said that you can great results with both.

You only apply the white glue to the wood.
 

Canadian cue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You only apply the white glue to the wood.

At the time I tried a few different approaches, I only mentioned the glue on both surfaces and an iron because it had certain advantages when it came to installation. It is an avenue that can be explored. I am sure you can glue leather to wood numerous ways with different glue and still end up with good results. But as far cons vs benefits I personally have found contact cement to work well. I may just revisit the white glue and compare to my results with contact cement now that I have nailed my technique. I have been doing them the same way for close to ten years and getting fairly consistent results, but Dave has me curious now. Perhaps there is another level of results I could be shooting for. I have been building cues on my own little island, metaphorically speaking. Other than comparing my results to pics on the web and seeing the cues that have come through the door it's hard to tell where your cue work sits on the quality scale.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
At the time I tried a few different approaches, I only mentioned the glue on both surfaces and an iron because it had certain advantages when it came to installation. It is an avenue that can be explored. I am sure you can glue leather to wood numerous ways with different glue and still end up with good results. But as far cons vs benefits I personally have found contact cement to work well. I may just revisit the white glue and compare to my results with contact cement now that I have nailed my technique. I have been doing them the same way for close to ten years and getting fairly consistent results, but Dave has me curious now. Perhaps there is another level of results I could be shooting for. I have been building cues on my own little island, metaphorically speaking. Other than comparing my results to pics on the web and seeing the cues that have come through the door it's hard to tell where your cue work sits on the quality scale.
I've gone through many glues and CC as well.
Now, I don't use elmer's white glue or cc.
And cork is also a different animal .
 

cbi1000

It is what it is...
Silver Member
A couple questions, how old its the glue SINCE you first opened it? Is there a lot of space for air in the can? What is the wood the handle is made from? Some woods need to be washed down with denatured alcohol first. Was this a brand new cue or did you replace the wrap on a cue? If replacing, I found that you have to remove ALL traces of the old glue as some contact cements do not play well with others and will leave it soft, and will move around. Learned that first while doing pool tables after someone used spray CC and I use brushed on weldwood. You also mentioned thinner? If you are thinning the contact cement, that is going to have an effect on dry time at the very least, if not the grab of it also.
Dave

The glue was pretty new, not a large amount of open air. I replaced a linen. The wrap grove was super clean.

I got it to work, it was just a pain. Looking for other options. Thanks
 
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