Well, I've tried some CTE at the table.

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
I've been reading the CTE book a bit. I actually was in about a 2 week slump. I had some spare time and decided to try CTE, because why not? I'm only on page 47 but have referenced the chapter on pivoting. I've not read in depth yet and barely practiced CTE. I practiced the first 3 example shots in the book til I was consistent, then played solo 9 ball for 3-4 hours one night using only CTE aims. At this point, it's kind of a medley or my normal aim and CTE but as I read more, I incorporate more CTE into my practice. It's like being spoon fed how to actually play pool. I have to tell you, it's working. I don't want to give a review yet because I've not practiced and am not in a position yet to evaluate it, it's still too early. I'm still neutrally skeptical.

I will say that there are several aspects I've found very helpful.

Using the edge as a reference point and checking the center ball is great. If you're eyes are between the two (and tilted correctly), you have a much better view of what's going on, and two reference points is just enough to distract you from playing sabotage head games with yourself. The shots, once aimed with CTE just have a feel to them. You're not doubting and instead of the "exact" laser point on the ball, you know it's going in and you can stroke it. CTE aiming really does need your participation to understand it. The book does a perfect job of explaining.

The pivot feels glorious, it feels like you might be trying some crazy half masse shot, but the CB goes dead straight to the aim point and it's in the pocket. For me personally, it adds feel into the shot, something I had lost a bit of. It feels fun again and my "subconscious/muscle memory" is earning an A+. That dude is phenomenal! Why the hell did I ever doubt that dude? Why was I ever worried about the outcome of a shot?

The shots go. Often in pool, the near infinite shot selection can be a detriment to me, I mean, I could hit the ball in 10 different places and get leave. Now add 4 other make-able shots into the equation and I'm lost sometimes. The truth is, most of the time I'm guessing and feeling for leave. I'm extrapolating from AMB and it's not always fun. With my normal method I get leave often, but many times the CB just does not do what I asked it. Limiting yourself to 6 cuts (not every cut is used on every shot (maybe 2 at most?), lets you imagine the possibilities without getting analysis paralysis. You can get anywhere on the table you want with any single aim point. Once you're CTE "aimed up" you can focus much of your effort on leave and the ball still goes.

I've also noticed on 9 ball, if I miss, the OB will actually slop more often in other pockets than normally (the angle thing?). The CB seems to have a good action that will sometimes even make unseen shots in for you after contacting the OB.

I've been skeptical as hell with CTE and I still haven't read or practiced enough to see the intricacies of it, but I think it's worth pursuing. Last night I felt like crap and not even into playing pool at all, but was asked to sub at 8 ball league I decided to use only CTE shots unless I was absolutely baffled. I only used my normal aim once, and I played a hell of a lot better than normal. My teammates noticed a difference and I shut down the two best players on the other team. Sure I still made a few mistakes, but I was playing a lot better than usual.

I've not mastered it enough to have my speed down, but every hit that went had that lovely ping sound of a perfectly struck ball. My misses were mine, not CTE's. My mind shut the hell up and the pool dance started. I didn't play perfect, I miscued once, as I tend to do when nervous in competition. I stroked a draw shot way too pure and scratched, giving BIH and losing a game. The thing is, I missed way less often and stroked the ball way more pure. I also had good safety play, good 2 way shots and even pocketed 2 balls at once twice (both times problem balls that would be hard for shape).

I hate to admit this, as I'm an inspector, but I have a hard time imagining angles. I didn't imagine/calculate any angles last night, If you're a pool player, you just automatically know which CTE point you need to shoot. You don't have to know jack about angles, just what looks right. When you're aiming pure, stroking pure, I have news for everyone, you only need a 15, 30, 45, rarely a 60, and almost never a paint scraper. It was news to me, but it's true. CTE simplifies your game because you have less choices for your "thinking brain" and you can just get to work on playing pool.

I know some are thinking, it's a new thing, it will wear off, every time you try something new it works then doesn't anymore. Well, that's why I won't do a review yet. It's working now, but I don't want to pass of "new cue syndrome" off as an objective review. But honestly, no shit, it shows real promise.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Gotta toss my .02 in here. Lets call making the intended shot one unit. Now missing the shot becomes infinity. Further with ProCT you'll have no pertinent detail on any of that infinity. Good bet?
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Gotta toss my .02 in here. Lets call making the intended shot one unit. Now missing the shot becomes infinity. Further with ProCT you'll have no pertinent detail on any of that infinity. Good bet?
Sorry, I don't think I follow?
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Sorry, I don't think I follow?
It's probably more important for you to arrive at your understanding of CTE but I'm saying the idea of pool technique is to make everything you shoot at. The reason that's so important is the misses will kill you. (duh) Most systems only go as far as the object ball disappearing down a hole. CTE doesn't resolve any further than this either. Worse, misses are just fail trash - nothing burgers - when in fact the details of a ball being off line enough to miss a pocket are the major concern of learning to shoot. Missing is the infinity.
 

The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
I've been reading the CTE book a bit. I actually was in about a 2 week slump. I had some spare time and decided to try CTE, because why not? I'm only on page 47 but have referenced the chapter on pivoting. I've not read in depth yet and barely practiced CTE. I practiced the first 3 example shots in the book til I was consistent, then played solo 9 ball for 3-4 hours one night using only CTE aims. At this point, it's kind of a medley or my normal aim and CTE but as I read more, I incorporate more CTE into my practice. It's like being spoon fed how to actually play pool. I have to tell you, it's working. I don't want to give a review yet because I've not practiced and am not in a position yet to evaluate it, it's still too early. I'm still neutrally skeptical.

I will say that there are several aspects I've found very helpful.

Using the edge as a reference point and checking the center ball is great. If you're eyes are between the two (and tilted correctly), you have a much better view of what's going on, and two reference points is just enough to distract you from playing sabotage head games with yourself. The shots, once aimed with CTE just have a feel to them. You're not doubting and instead of the "exact" laser point on the ball, you know it's going in and you can stroke it. CTE aiming really does need your participation to understand it. The book does a perfect job of explaining.

The pivot feels glorious, it feels like you might be trying some crazy half masse shot, but the CB goes dead straight to the aim point and it's in the pocket. For me personally, it adds feel into the shot, something I had lost a bit of. It feels fun again and my "subconscious/muscle memory" is earning an A+. That dude is phenomenal! Why the hell did I ever doubt that dude? Why was I ever worried about the outcome of a shot?

The shots go. Often in pool, the near infinite shot selection can be a detriment to me, I mean, I could hit the ball in 10 different places and get leave. Now add 4 other make-able shots into the equation and I'm lost sometimes. The truth is, most of the time I'm guessing and feeling for leave. I'm extrapolating from AMB and it's not always fun. With my normal method I get leave often, but many times the CB just does not do what I asked it. Limiting yourself to 6 cuts (not every cut is used on every shot (maybe 2 at most?), lets you imagine the possibilities without getting analysis paralysis. You can get anywhere on the table you want with any single aim point. Once you're CTE "aimed up" you can focus much of your effort on leave and the ball still goes.

I've also noticed on 9 ball, if I miss, the OB will actually slop more often in other pockets than normally (the angle thing?). The CB seems to have a good action that will sometimes even make unseen shots in for you after contacting the OB.

I've been skeptical as hell with CTE and I still haven't read or practiced enough to see the intricacies of it, but I think it's worth pursuing. Last night I felt like crap and not even into playing pool at all, but was asked to sub at 8 ball league I decided to use only CTE shots unless I was absolutely baffled. I only used my normal aim once, and I played a hell of a lot better than normal. My teammates noticed a difference and I shut down the two best players on the other team. Sure I still made a few mistakes, but I was playing a lot better than usual.

I've not mastered it enough to have my speed down, but every hit that went had that lovely ping sound of a perfectly struck ball. My misses were mine, not CTE's. My mind shut the hell up and the pool dance started. I didn't play perfect, I miscued once, as I tend to do when nervous in competition. I stroked a draw shot way too pure and scratched, giving BIH and losing a game. The thing is, I missed way less often and stroked the ball way more pure. I also had good safety play, good 2 way shots and even pocketed 2 balls at once twice (both times problem balls that would be hard for shape).

I hate to admit this, as I'm an inspector, but I have a hard time imagining angles. I didn't imagine/calculate any angles last night, If you're a pool player, you just automatically know which CTE point you need to shoot. You don't have to know jack about angles, just what looks right. When you're aiming pure, stroking pure, I have news for everyone, you only need a 15, 30, 45, rarely a 60, and almost never a paint scraper. It was news to me, but it's true. CTE simplifies your game because you have less choices for your "thinking brain" and you can just get to work on playing pool.

I know some are thinking, it's a new thing, it will wear off, every time you try something new it works then doesn't anymore. Well, that's why I won't do a review yet. It's working now, but I don't want to pass of "new cue syndrome" off as an objective review. But honestly, no shit, it shows real promise.
I know that feeling... When I tried out Poolology for the first time and the balls dropped when I was out of my normal routine, I was in minor awe. I only add 'minor' because I was expecting success. I remember being a kid with new shoes and swearing I could run faster as well.

I have no axe to grind with CTE or any other system, and I think it's fantasic that you have positive results. More improtantly using the system has seemed to instill more enjoyment into the game for you.

Quieting the mind is a method most here don't even consider. So much hyper focus on every tiny aspect of their game within the moment. Extensive lists of steps and procedures just to end up putting the ball into the rail. Makes me wonder how anyone makes a ball...lol.

If boiling down the shot options works for you, then stick with it. Whether it be with CTE or anything else.

Looking forward to your more experienced review.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've been reading the CTE book a bit. I actually was in about a 2 week slump. I had some spare time and decided to try CTE, because why not? I'm only on page 47 but have referenced the chapter on pivoting. I've not read in depth yet and barely practiced CTE. I practiced the first 3 example shots in the book til I was consistent, then played solo 9 ball for 3-4 hours one night using only CTE aims. At this point, it's kind of a medley or my normal aim and CTE but as I read more, I incorporate more CTE into my practice. It's like being spoon fed how to actually play pool. I have to tell you, it's working. I don't want to give a review yet because I've not practiced and am not in a position yet to evaluate it, it's still too early. I'm still neutrally skeptical.

I will say that there are several aspects I've found very helpful.

Using the edge as a reference point and checking the center ball is great. If you're eyes are between the two (and tilted correctly), you have a much better view of what's going on, and two reference points is just enough to distract you from playing sabotage head games with yourself. The shots, once aimed with CTE just have a feel to them. You're not doubting and instead of the "exact" laser point on the ball, you know it's going in and you can stroke it. CTE aiming really does need your participation to understand it. The book does a perfect job of explaining.

The pivot feels glorious, it feels like you might be trying some crazy half masse shot, but the CB goes dead straight to the aim point and it's in the pocket. For me personally, it adds feel into the shot, something I had lost a bit of. It feels fun again and my "subconscious/muscle memory" is earning an A+. That dude is phenomenal! Why the hell did I ever doubt that dude? Why was I ever worried about the outcome of a shot?

The shots go. Often in pool, the near infinite shot selection can be a detriment to me, I mean, I could hit the ball in 10 different places and get leave. Now add 4 other make-able shots into the equation and I'm lost sometimes. The truth is, most of the time I'm guessing and feeling for leave. I'm extrapolating from AMB and it's not always fun. With my normal method I get leave often, but many times the CB just does not do what I asked it. Limiting yourself to 6 cuts (not every cut is used on every shot (maybe 2 at most?), lets you imagine the possibilities without getting analysis paralysis. You can get anywhere on the table you want with any single aim point. Once you're CTE "aimed up" you can focus much of your effort on leave and the ball still goes.

I've also noticed on 9 ball, if I miss, the OB will actually slop more often in other pockets than normally (the angle thing?). The CB seems to have a good action that will sometimes even make unseen shots in for you after contacting the OB.

I've been skeptical as hell with CTE and I still haven't read or practiced enough to see the intricacies of it, but I think it's worth pursuing. Last night I felt like crap and not even into playing pool at all, but was asked to sub at 8 ball league I decided to use only CTE shots unless I was absolutely baffled. I only used my normal aim once, and I played a hell of a lot better than normal. My teammates noticed a difference and I shut down the two best players on the other team. Sure I still made a few mistakes, but I was playing a lot better than usual.

I've not mastered it enough to have my speed down, but every hit that went had that lovely ping sound of a perfectly struck ball. My misses were mine, not CTE's. My mind shut the hell up and the pool dance started. I didn't play perfect, I miscued once, as I tend to do when nervous in competition. I stroked a draw shot way too pure and scratched, giving BIH and losing a game. The thing is, I missed way less often and stroked the ball way more pure. I also had good safety play, good 2 way shots and even pocketed 2 balls at once twice (both times problem balls that would be hard for shape).

I hate to admit this, as I'm an inspector, but I have a hard time imagining angles. I didn't imagine/calculate any angles last night, If you're a pool player, you just automatically know which CTE point you need to shoot. You don't have to know jack about angles, just what looks right. When you're aiming pure, stroking pure, I have news for everyone, you only need a 15, 30, 45, rarely a 60, and almost never a paint scraper. It was news to me, but it's true. CTE simplifies your game because you have less choices for your "thinking brain" and you can just get to work on playing pool.

I know some are thinking, it's a new thing, it will wear off, every time you try something new it works then doesn't anymore. Well, that's why I won't do a review yet. It's working now, but I don't want to pass of "new cue syndrome" off as an objective review. But honestly, no shit, it shows real promise.
Interesting review. It is obvious that you are sold on CTE much to your indications otherwise. It seems you are someone who has thought process issues with the game and something that simplifies that might be a good solution for you. If it helps you that is great. I just wish the proponents of the method would stop misrepresenting what CTE actually does. That's really not an unreasonable thing. Testimonials like yours are plenty good for making sales and growing the popularity of CTE.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Interesting review. It is obvious that you are sold on CTE much to your indications otherwise. It seems you are someone who has thought process issues with the game and something that simplifies that might be a good solution for you. If it helps you that is great. I just wish the proponents of the method would stop misrepresenting what CTE actually does. That's really not an unreasonable thing. Testimonials like yours are plenty good for making sales and growing the popularity of CTE.
Well the thing is on days I am "on" I can handle anything the table can throw my way. Then on other days, I better only play one shot ahead.

I've not really played much since that night, but I wasn't in pool mode for a whole week before. It did seem to greatly simplify things. For example, if you only hit certain cte aims, you only have one tangent line, and you don't try to force dumb stuff. I don't know, again, it shows promise but only more usage will tell if it's "new cue syndrome" or not.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well the thing is on days I am "on" I can handle anything the table can throw my way. Then on other days, I better only play one shot ahead.

I've not really played much since that night, but I wasn't in pool mode for a whole week before. It did seem to greatly simplify things. For example, if you only hit certain cte aims, you only have one tangent line, and you don't try to force dumb stuff. I don't know, again, it shows promise but only more usage will tell if it's "new cue syndrome" or not.
It sounds like you are talking more about position play when you mention the tangent line, no?
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
It sounds like you are talking more about position play when you mention the tangent line, no?
Yeah I am. I'm an 8B player through and through. I've been playing 9B pretty much exclusively and it's teaching me a lot of stuff that never comes up in 8B. I know about tangent lines and how to get leave, but it's not something you're forced to do on every shot in 8B. With my limited practice with CTE, I've found only having one tangent line to deal with has got me thinking more about position zones/sides and the such. It seems to be helping me with this aspect of my game that has been neglected for a long time.

I'm notorious for trying to force shape "against the grain" instead of relying on natural shape. Limiting "aim point" has let me focus more on shape and better understand the ball's natural path. Instead of sorting through a bunch of data I have less to focus on. I don't know if it will be any benefit to someone who already knows this stuff by heart, but for me it's helping me observe and learn on lacking areas.
 

BC21

Poolology
Gold Member
Silver Member
Yeah I am. I'm an 8B player through and through. I've been playing 9B pretty much exclusively and it's teaching me a lot of stuff that never comes up in 8B. I know about tangent lines and how to get leave, but it's not something you're forced to do on every shot in 8B. With my limited practice with CTE, I've found only having one tangent line to deal with has got me thinking more about position zones/sides and the such. It seems to be helping me with this aspect of my game that has been neglected for a long time.

I'm notorious for trying to force shape "against the grain" instead of relying on natural shape. Limiting "aim point" has let me focus more on shape and better understand the ball's natural path. Instead of sorting through a bunch of data I have less to focus on. I don't know if it will be any benefit to someone who already knows this stuff by heart, but for me it's helping me observe and learn on lacking areas.
For any shot, isn't there always just one tangent line? And this is true regardless of what aiming method you use.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
For any shot, isn't there always just one tangent line? And this is true regardless of what aiming method you use.
Yeah, there is, but when I take my aim (normally, not CTE) I may decide to hit it thick, thin, CIT, how draw/spin/throw effects the shot. I can have several different tangent lines depending on how I hit the ball on each shot. Too much to think about. When I'm playing good this isn't the case, but on bad days it sucks. All the while, I'm trying to keep a pinpoint aim burned into my visual focus.

With CTE I don't have to hold this focus in quite the same method. I think it's what they call the no imagination shot line (not sure). You have two lines, if you lose your visual focus, you're already down on the shot right and can get back on your aim. With my normal aim, I try to do so with feel and may end up hitting the ball at the incorrect spot. This is from a ripe beginner at the system, so it might not be how it works for seasoned CTE guys. It's not magic or anything, but having two references can really tune your aim in, but it really has to do with eye placement between the lines. Having only one shot to take is easier (and one aim line derived from two averages out aiming error, so around half the error?) Once I don't have to hold this visual focus so damn tightly I can focus on how to stroke the ball and where my tangent line will actually be, how to bend it off rails with spin, etc. I always felt leave was a feel thing, but now I can focus on the tangents and not have to fight natural shape. It's got me focusing on being on the right side of the line, etc. It might not mean anything for seasoned players, but it's really helping me shore up a weak area of my game.

Once I get where I'm wanting to be, I may not use CTE, but I may. I feel it helps reduce the error in shots that I'm not as familiar with. I guess that's the point of any aiming system, to have a base value to learn from, but never having a system other than HAMB and feel, this feels nice. The two aim lines really does help me personally reduce error, and the act of averaging out the aim lines to get the no imagination shot line keeps me from self sabotaging with mental head games. With CTE I've found myself literally thinking (or saying out loud in self practice) "I'm going to give this shot the best chance possible to go in." Whereas before I would say "Yeah, this feels alright." Feels alright leaves room for doubt and self sabotage. Again, not saying this is anything to do with official CTE, but it's got me in the right frame of mind for putting maximum effort into making the ball and getting shape.
 
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Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Yeah, there is, but when I take my aim (normally, not CTE) I may decide to hit it thick, thin, CIT, how draw/spin/throw effects the shot. I can have several different tangent lines depending on how I hit the ball on each shot. Too much to think about. When I'm playing good this isn't the case, but on bad days it sucks. All the while, I'm trying to keep a pinpoint aim burned into my visual focus.

With CTE I don't have to hold this focus in quite the same method. I think it's what they call the no imagination shot line (not sure). You have two lines, if you lose your visual focus, you're already down on the shot right and can get back on your aim. With my normal aim, I try to do so with feel and may end up hitting the ball at the incorrect spot. This is from a ripe beginner at the system, so it might not be how it works for seasoned CTE guys. It's not magic or anything, but having two references can really tune your aim in, but it really has to do with eye placement between the lines. Having only one shot to take is easier (and one aim line derived from two averages out aiming error, so around half the error?) Once I don't have to hold this visual focus so damn tightly I can focus on how to stroke the ball and where my tangent line will actually be, how to bend it off rails with spin, etc. I always felt leave was a feel thing, but now I can focus on the tangents and not have to fight natural shape. It's got me focusing on being on the right side of the line, etc. It might not mean anything for seasoned players, but it's really helping me shore up a weak area of my game.

Once I get where I'm wanting to be, I may not use CTE, but I may. I feel it helps reduce the error in shots that I'm not as familiar with. I guess that's the point of any aiming system, to have a base value to learn from, but never having a system other than HAMB and feel, this feels nice. The two aim lines really does help me personally reduce error, and the act of averaging out the aim lines to get the no imagination shot line keeps me from self sabotaging with mental head games. With CTE I've found myself literally thinking (or saying out loud in self practice) "I'm going to give this shot the best chance possible to go in." Whereas before I would say "Yeah, this feels alright." Feels alright leaves room for doubt and self sabotage. Again, not saying this is anything to do with official CTE, but it's got me in the right frame of mind for putting maximum effort into making the ball and getting shape.
Seems to me you are way over thinking everything. There is no need to ponder over multiple tangent lines created by slightly different hits on the object ball. Also, CTE is not going to magically point you to the shot line unless the two balls happen to be on that line in the first place. It may ultimately do more harm than good.

Here's a suggestion. Set up some simple shots and shoot them. Before each one ask yourself if the shot looks on. If the answer is yes and the ball goes in then your subconscious has that shot down and you can TRUST that feeling that says the shot is on. If the shot looks good and you miss then set it up over and over again until it looks on and actually goes in. If you do this for awhile you will begin to see that the little voice in your head can be trusted. This is the ultimate goal. Do not do this with difficult shots because then your stroke errors are magnified and you might misinterpret a stroke error as an aim error.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
...having two references can really tune your aim in
This is the one aspect of CTE that interests me - adding the center-to-edge reference to the usual fractional reference not only "anchors" the CB/OB relationship while aiming, but the changing visual relationship between the two lines might add visual "triangulation" to aid recognition of memorized cut angles.

pj
chgo
 

The_JV

'AZB_Combat Certified'
Here's a suggestion. Set up some simple shots and shoot them. Before each one ask yourself if the shot looks on. If the answer is yes and the ball goes in then your subconscious has that shot down and you can TRUST that feeling that says the shot is on. If the shot looks good and you miss then set it up over and over again until it looks on and actually goes in. If you do this for awhile you will begin to see that the little voice in your head can be trusted. This is the ultimate goal.
This is how everyone I knew prior to joining AZB learned to aim.

Edit: I had some other comments, but I know how annoying it can be to want a civil conversation and not get it, so I deleted it.
 
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