Who taught you the most important thing?

Shooter08

Runde Aficianado
Silver Member
Honor the one who taught you the most valuable thing in pool, or on a more important level something that also pertained to life in addition to pool. I'm curious if there is a six degree of separation factor here. How many of us know someone in common that directly influenced us.
 

franko

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not

Honor the one who taught you the most valuable thing in pool, or on a more important level something that also pertained to life in addition to pool. I'm curious if there is a six degree of separation factor here. How many of us know someone in common that directly influenced us.

Not earth shattering but a good tip in Pool. Everyone is always talking about and writing about aiming. I heard Alison Fisher say " aiming is easy you just hit the spot on the object ball that is farthest from the pocket " It just made everything crystal clear, and improved my shot making.
 

ga9ball

South West Buyer!
Gold Member
Silver Member
Dad

By the time l was around 15 I was able to beat most of the regulars in my Dad's room.
Loved to gamble cheap $5 a rack 9 ball.
My dad would be behind the counter, me on table 1
He would say in Greek so no one would understand " siga siga " = take it easy, because l was always in a hurry to get the $$$$. Take it slow, you will earn more in the end!

Love you Pop, you were the best ever!
 

franko

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Great

By the time l was around 15 I was able to beat most of the regulars in my Dad's room.
Loved to gamble cheap $5 a rack 9 ball.
My dad would be behind the counter, me on table 1
He would say in Greek so no one would understand " siga siga " = take it easy, because l was always in a hurry to get the $$$$. Take it slow, you will earn more in the end!

Love you Pop, you were the best ever!

How great is that , playing 9 ball on table one in your Dad's room. Great memory Greg thanks for sharing.
 

BmoreMoney

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
By the time l was around 15 I was able to beat most of the regulars in my Dad's room.
Loved to gamble cheap $5 a rack 9 ball.
My dad would be behind the counter, me on table 1
He would say in Greek so no one would understand " siga siga " = take it easy, because l was always in a hurry to get the $$$$. Take it slow, you will earn more in the end!

Love you Pop, you were the best ever!

NONSENSE BRO!!!!!!! Everyone knows the quickest and best way to a BIG SCORE is A few bobbled and hung up nine balls eight there in the pocket reaffirming the guys belief that he IS INFACT STEALING!!!!! ----- As he unscrews shaking his head handing you his last stack and telling anyone who is listening how bad u play, how lucky u are, and of course that he really IS STEALING!!!!! LOL ;)
 

Rockin' Robin

Mr. Texas Express
Silver Member
U.J. Puckett....or some card player ...I really cannot remember that far back....told me....Gambling is for Suckers.

So, from then on, I had the best of any game.
 

Busboy

Wanna Play Some?
Silver Member
By the time l was around 15 I was able to beat most of the regulars in my Dad's room.
Loved to gamble cheap $5 a rack 9 ball.
My dad would be behind the counter, me on table 1
He would say in Greek so no one would understand " siga siga " = take it easy, because l was always in a hurry to get the $$$$. Take it slow, you will earn more in the end!

Love you Pop, you were the best ever!

Really neat too hear thanks for sharing I used too rush shots and move my head a tad I'd never really noticed till one night I was hitting balls at small tourney with justin bergman he seen that I had some head movement when shooting sometimes and he told me and I fixed it and I was blow away on how much it helped me too slow down and be still now I don't ever miss lol :thumbup:
 

ddadams

Absolutely love this cue.
Silver Member
Really neat too hear thanks for sharing I used too rush shots and move my head a tad I'd never really noticed till one night I was hitting balls at small tourney with justin bergman he seen that I had some head movement when shooting sometimes and he told me and I fixed it and I was blow away on how much it helped me too slow down and be still now I don't ever miss lol :thumbup:


You never miss!??

That's impressive as hell. Congrats on that.
 

Poolmanis

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I got most valuable lesson from Bert Kinister 60 minute workout.
How to go everywhere without scratching.
Middle of the table is teacher!

Those 3 first tapes changed my game forever.
 

Colonel

Living The Dream
Silver Member
I grew up in my fathers hall & he taught me that the most important thing is repeatability. To have the exact same routine when addressing the ball pre shot, no matter how easy or how difficult, always the same.

It also applies other factors in the game, being able to produce a repeatable stroke, being one & in rotation pool developing a break that is repeatable. Repetition is the key to a great game.
 
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Busboy

Wanna Play Some?
Silver Member
I grew up in my fathers hall & he taught me that the most important thing is repeatability. To have the exact same routine when addressing the ball pre shot, no matter how easy or how difficult, always the same.

Smart man he's right :grin:
 

Baxter

Out To Win
Silver Member
I grew up in my fathers hall & he taught me that the most important thing is repeatability. To have the exact same routine when addressing the ball pre shot, no matter how easy or how difficult, always the same.

+1

I came into pool from a golf background, and one of the biggest keys to consistency in golf is the preshot routine. I had my preshot routine in golf timed down to be the same within a second and a half every shot. Consistent results come from approaching the situation consistently.

Next time you're watching golf on tv, pay attention. The player will address the shot, and once they know what they're going to do they'll trigger themselves into their preshot routine. My trigger is a tug on my shirt on my right shoulder. That trigger initiates the preshot routine. My preshot routine is between 25 and 27 seconds. Once I tug on my shirt, I'll strike the ball between 25 and 27 seconds later, every shot. It's the same every time. The amount of time it takes to consider the right shot to hit under the conditions varies, but once that is decided it pretty much comes down to an ignition sequence and a countdown to launch.

Why would pool be any different?
 
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Ak Guy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The Pearl

Has to be the one and only Earl "The Pearl" Strickland. After watching him when he was loosing, I knew I always wanted to be a gracious looser and not a horses ass.
 

lorider

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i have 2 things equally important that i was taught by 2 former team mates. both sayings have helped my win % a lot and will give an example of each.

1. play the table...not your opponent.
money league playoffs for 2nd place. my captain throws me " a 3 at the time " and they threw an 8. as i got up i told my team mate " a 10 ...the highest in the league " i cant beat this guy. he says play the table...not your opponent. i won 3-0 .

2. if you can not run out ...play safe. taught to me by an apa 7/9
8 ball tri cups. i am a 5 and play a 7. hill- hill. he breaks and runs down to the 8 ...rattles the pocket and leaves it hanging. i make a ball and play safe even though i have several good shots available. he kicks and misses.

i take bih..make a ball and play safe.he kicks and misses. rinse and repeat again. he kicks a 3rd time and scratches.

some times i revert to my old ways of trying to run out all the time but when i follow those 2 mantras i usually win.
 

Sealegs50

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In college (early 1970s), my fraternity house had a 9 ft. pool table. I was a hack, but loved playing and used it as a daily study break in the evenings. One guy in the house, Joe, was a fairly good player, but his older brother Rick Daher who visited occasionally was great. IMO, he remains as one of the best non-professional players I have ever seen play. One Saturday morning, Rick was visiting, but his brother was busy leaving Rick with not much to do. Beginning at about 8:00 AM, Rick started to teach me the only pool lesson I have ever taken. He spent an entire 8 hour day showing me the basics of pool. In essence, he covered just about everything in the books that were later to publish, Banking with the Beard and The 99 Critical Shots in Pool. I absorbed everything he said that day. The skills he taught took me from being a decent shot maker to adding position play in my game. By the next year, I reached the semifinals in the university straight pool tournament. I was hooked from then on. I am still a hack, but the skills I developed that day served as the foundation for 40+ years of playing.

Since pool has been a major pastime for me, I always wanted to thank Rick for the day he spent with me and tell him how much enjoyment I have experienced as a result. I lost track of his younger brother and repeated attempts to find Rick came up dry. Just over a year ago, I tried again and managed to find his phone number. After a few attempts, I reached him and let him know at the outset that this was going to be an unusual call. He gave up pool just after that time and focused on a new business venture that became his livelihood and from which he eventually retired. A phone call out of the blue was clearly not on his initial daily agenda. But he appreciated the thanks for something he did 40 years earlier.

That part of the story was posted previously.

About a year and a half ago, my wife and I were visiting Dayton, OH and passing some time at Airway Billiards. The room was packed. There were two guys I noticed on the table next to us who looked to be pretty good. When one of them left the table briefly, I noticed that the guy who remained stood at the table a lot like Rick. He was tall and had a particular way to get close to his game. I also noticed that guy was playing with a Sampaio cue, which is not common these days and was the type of cue that Rick used. So I started up a conversation and as it turned out, it was Rick. I reintroduced myself. A few minutes later, the other guy returned and said, "How do you know my brother?" It was Joe.
 

I Got Lucky

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
"It's not what you make, it's what you leave" -- A local guy here in the Philippines.

"One player is always happy with every shot" Same guy.
 
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