Why a Full Splice?

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
Another thread poses the question of whether points affect hit/feel. My question is how/why did full splice cues happen to develop in the first place. I was told, as a child, that the purpose of the full splice was to provide a way to cushion, or diffuse, the impact of a cue. (Why are cues made like that? Why not a solid piece of wood?) I was never sure whether the goal was to lessen the impact on the player or the cue ball, but even then I wondered why such a small force would require such a complex structural modification. Later on, I heard that full splices were created to prevent or correct warping.

Anyone?
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
'Cause they look badass. Enough for me. ;) I think B'wick used the method for strength/straightness and beauty in the veneer colors. Try making a house cue from one piece of wood. Good luck on getting very many straight ones.
 
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Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
Truly, if that's the answer, its good enough for me. Points + veneers = perfection. I was just wondering if there was something involved beyond aesthetics. When you consider them, a full splice is a complex piece of wood work. I examined many wood splices in my grandfather's boatyard and the full splice is as interesting as any.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Might get a better answer in the ask the cue maker forum
 

mark187

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Splicing means you can add a heavier wood in the butt. Snooker cues use heavy woods, like ebony, to increase the weight without having to bore in and insert metal weights. Plain maple or Ash would be too light without adding weights. Also, it looks better. What I don't understand is why pool cues are made with sharp points, rather than having the rounded fingers of a hand spliced snooker cue. In europe sharp points in 'machine spliced' cues are looked at very negatively, and you wouldn't see any player of any quality with one.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Splicing means you can add a heavier wood in the butt. Snooker cues use heavy woods, like ebony, to increase the weight without having to bore in and insert metal weights. Plain maple or Ash would be too light without adding weights. Also, it looks better. What I don't understand is why pool cues are made with sharp points, rather than having the rounded fingers of a hand spliced snooker cue. In europe sharp points in 'machine spliced' cues are looked at very negatively, and you wouldn't see any player of any quality with one.
I'll let ya know when i give a rat's ass what Euro players think of sharp points. Seriously????? Until CNC equip. came on the scene sharp points were the sign of quality. To many they still are even though the CNC-made rounded points are just as good. They just look cheap to most players.
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
I keep forgetting about butterfly splices. I assumed they came first and that they gave birth to the "pointed" full splice, but who knows. I keep telling myself that I need to buy one of the comprehensive books on the history of billiards and quit relying on pool hall folklore and my unfounded assumptions. Any recommendations as to which book is best?
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I keep forgetting about butterfly splices. I assumed they came first and that they gave birth to the "pointed" full splice, but who knows. I keep telling myself that I need to buy one of the comprehensive books on the history of billiards and quit relying on pool hall folklore and my unfounded assumptions. Any recommendations as to which book is best?
Butterfly splice can be added to any cue butt. Not near as tuff as making a true full-splice. Watch some of Bob Dzuricky's videos.
 

Texas Carom Club

play 1cushion & balkline
Silver Member
i dont care whats a true splice or sneaky, i just care about how it feels and looks

and i like veneered full splices
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The sharpness of points on well made custom cues, for me, is one of the defining methods of identifying the art and skill that went into the making of the cue. To some, like myself, placing a well made pointed and veneered cue a few feet away and observing the look that those points give to the cue is really the nuts!

Guys like Balabushka, Szamboti, Gene Balner ( Palmer) Frank Paradise, were all either born in Europe or European descendants - so what Europeans like or dislike in cues today has no bearing on what Europeans many years ago brought to the American cue making art.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Butterfly splice can be added to any cue butt. Not near as tuff as making a true full-splice. Watch some of Bob Dzuricky's videos.
Ah- I own a DZ cue- bought from an AZ er here, I love the construction and design of that cue- and it PLAYS!
 

Biloxi Boy

Man With A Golden Arm
Here again, incomplete knowledge/poolore trips me up. I had learned that a butterfly splice was a form of full splice.
 

Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I keep forgetting about butterfly splices. I assumed they came first and that they gave birth to the "pointed" full splice, but who knows. I keep telling myself that I need to buy one of the comprehensive books on the history of billiards and quit relying on pool hall folklore and my unfounded assumptions. Any recommendations as to which book is best?
The Billiard Encyclopedia, by Victor Stein...expensive, but worth it.

Scott Lee
2019 PBIA Instructor of the Year
Director, SPF National Pool School Tour
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ah- I own a DZ cue- bought from an AZ er here, I love the construction and design of that cue- and it PLAYS!
He's quite the craftsman. Never seen one other than on here. Watched his vids and its very impressive what he does.
 

Z-Nole

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Truly, if that's the answer, its good enough for me. Points + veneers = perfection. I was just wondering if there was something involved beyond aesthetics. When you consider them, a full splice is a complex piece of wood work. I examined many wood splices in my grandfather's boatyard and the full splice is as interesting as any.
What boatyard did you're grandfather own? Around here all of the boat yards are being turned into condos. There a few left in south Florida to handle the Caribbean boats but one around me.
 

alstl

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Splicing means you can add a heavier wood in the butt. Snooker cues use heavy woods, like ebony, to increase the weight without having to bore in and insert metal weights. Plain maple or Ash would be too light without adding weights. Also, it looks better. What I don't understand is why pool cues are made with sharp points, rather than having the rounded fingers of a hand spliced snooker cue. In europe sharp points in 'machine spliced' cues are looked at very negatively, and you wouldn't see any player of any quality with one.
Are you willing to give me a thousand dollars for every video I can find of a top European player using a cue with sharp points?
 

mark187

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Are you willing to give me a thousand dollars for every video I can find of a top European player using a cue with sharp points?
In terms of snooker cues, yes. European 9 ball players probably import their cues from the US or China.
 
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