Allison vs Jean?

L.S. Dennis

Active member
Well the old question arises from time to time, in their primes who was the better of the two? I know it’s almost impossible to say kind of like the old Ali vs Marciano debate but l thought I‘d throw it out there anyway. Maybe Jay could chime in on this one.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Both were very, very dominant players at their height. Therefore, I think that a lot to do with the outcome of a protracted match between the two would be based more upon mental make- up than disparity of skill levels. Would the seemingly steel like construction of Allison's disciplined stroke and game hold up under the challenge and would Jean's competitively dominant nature over-rule any creeping emotions if the challenge was going south on her during the match?

Always an interesting discussion in sports of how greats, who never met at their peak, would fair had that actually occurred. I think this one is a coin toss, and should be an even money bet.

As for Ali vs. Marciano- I would go with Ali on a bet just because he was so much bigger, faster, boxing skilled, and perhaps most importantly, he proved that he could take a punch from even bigger and stronger guys and still prevail - I love Marciano- but I would bet heavy on Ali, even if he were odds - on favorite at reasonable odds. Though, of course, it only takes one punch- ask Jersey Joe Wolcott!
 

Z-Nole

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Both were very, very dominant players at their height. Therefore, I think that a lot to do with the outcome of a protracted match between the two would be based more upon mental make- up than disparity of skill levels. Would the seemingly steel like construction of Allison's disciplined stroke and game hold up under the challenge and would Jean's competitively dominant nature over-rule any creeping emotions if the challenge was going south on her during the match?

Always an interesting discussion in sports of how greats, who never met at their peak, would fair had that actually occurred. I think this one is a coin toss, and should be an even money bet.

As for Ali vs. Marciano- I would go with Ali on a bet just because he was so much bigger, faster, boxing skilled, and perhaps most importantly, he proved that he could take a punch from even bigger and stronger guys and still prevail - I love Marciano- but I would bet heavy on Ali, even if he were odds - on favorite at reasonable odds. Though, of course, it only takes one punch- ask Jersey Joe Wolcott!
I like to think the four of them are also up there discussing the same thing right now.
 

btal

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Well the old question arises from time to time, in their primes who was the better of the two? I know it’s almost impossible to say kind of like the old Ali vs Marciano debate but l thought I‘d throw it out there anyway. Maybe Jay could chime in on this one.
Around the 1980s, variations on the push-out rule began to appear whereby it was only allowed on the shot immediately after the break shot. By 1990 this new push-out rule had become ubiquitous and any additional rules appended to the push-out rule were collectively referred to as "Texas express" rules.

Jean's shot making was understandably better (the rules demanded it) and her break and all around game were far more powerful. On today's faster cloth Allison's snooker expertise would give her an edge in a match under the present Texas Express rules. IMO Jean would have to raise her moving game to compete. She surely was capable of that. Of course if the two competed on slower cloth without the Texas Express, Jean would be the favorite. Different eras for the two in their heydays.
 

easy-e

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Around the 1980s, variations on the push-out rule began to appear whereby it was only allowed on the shot immediately after the break shot. By 1990 this new push-out rule had become ubiquitous and any additional rules appended to the push-out rule were collectively referred to as "Texas express" rules.

Jean's shot making was understandably better (the rules demanded it) and her break and all around game were far more powerful. On today's faster cloth Allison's snooker expertise would give her an edge in a match under the present Texas Express rules. IMO Jean would have to raise her moving game to compete. She surely was capable of that. Of course if the two competed on slower cloth without the Texas Express, Jean would be the favorite. Different eras for the two in their heydays.
Great post. Clarify something for me please. Are you saying that Jean's shot making was better than Allison's? I'd think Allison's snooker background would make her a far better pocketer.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I only saw Jean once in person and she had a bad night playing Jimmy Fusco.
So it's tough for me to comment on her skills.
On the other hand I've watched a lot of Allison on T.V. and u tube.
In my opinion there were few male or female players ever that had her control of the cue ball.
 
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Brain71

Railbird
Silver Member
I have to say Allison. Form. Control. Power when needed. Not knocking Jean at all. I've heard all the stories. But Allison's achievements are documented. How many US Opens? National titles? World titles? That's just 9 ball. Both are great players but Allison took it another level.
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
Jean was tougher mentally, but Allison kept her cool better. Allison didn't give up tournament play because somebody pissed her off. Allison's female opponents, as a whole, were better players than were Jean's overall, and the older she got, the tougher the opponents got. Allison was a great safety player...better than Jean IMHO (although my exposure to Jean is only through video). Allison was a better representative of the game as far as the public's eye was/is concerned. To me, Jean seemed to have this tough-guy, bully persona which went a bit over-the-top.

These of course are merely opinions. I would have to rate Allison in her prime a tad above Jean as far as all-around skill/talent is concerned. People sometimes do not figure in that Allison was also a highly successful snooker player before coming from across the pond to began her brilliant career in 9-ball.
 

justnum

Principal Investigator of Magic Trick Shots
Silver Member
does jean know how to use a jump cue?

allison has her own break cue named after her.


I favor allison because she has competition experience with new equipment


i favor jean over allison in 14.1

14.1 remains unchanged
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
They were both products of their times. Both talented gifted players. When Jean played among the women no one was even close to her. Before her players like Dorothy Wise, Gerry Titcome, Palmer Bird and a few others were all there were. While they played good Jean was from another planet. It is posable Jean was never pushed to be the best she may have been, we will never know.
I believe Allison was a fanatic and the professional that Jean never was or had to be. Jean may even have turned sour on the game from having played so young.
So it cant be answered. Two different people, different motivations and different times.
 

chenjy9

Well-known member
Similar to Efren or Earl or O'Sullivan, Jean was someone who had the ability to entice and interest even casuals.
 

kkdanamatt

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I was fortunate to have seen both Jean and Allison in their primes.
Jean never had to face the really stiff competition that Allison faced.
Yes, there were a few female players who occasionally gave Jean some tough matches...Robin, Loree Jon, Ewa, Belinda, etc.
But she completely dominated the field in most tournaments during the 1970's and 1980's.
After Jean withdrew from competition, Allison rose to stardom during the 1990's and the 2000's in the US.
Allison faced tougher competition than did Jean during her career...Jeanette, Karen, Kelly, Gerda, etc.
But, if I had to make a wager, I'd go with Jean.
 

arnaldo

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i favor jean over allison in 14.1

14.1 remains unchanged
I totally agree. Jean's Straight Pool high run was reputedly 134 -- per the highly-unofficial, but believable and stimulating link below. Allison, for a variety of understandable career reasons (8-, 9-, and 10-ball) never got anywhere close to this. (Had she specialized at some point, she certainly had the skill set to equal or exceed that amount by a couple racks at least . . . as Jeanette Lee's highest run did.)

http://www.thehypertexts.com/Pool%20Billiards%20record%20high%20runs.htm

(The reference to Jean's high run can be found (I've pasted below) in the Irving Crane section of the long web page.)

Irving Crane, straight pool, ran 150 balls and out against Joe Balsis in the finals of the 1966 US Open championship
Welker Cochran, 18.1 balkline, 150 exhibition high average in 1927
Pulman, snooker, 147 maximum break in 1965
Ralph Greenleaf, continuous pool, 137 balls (unfinished) at Camden, NJ, in 1918
Jean Balukas, straight pool, 134 balls
Jack Schaeffer Jr., 28.2 balkline billiards, 132 balls record high run in 1937
Ruth McGinnis, straight pool, 128 balls (she also had runs of 126, 125 and 85)
Tkach Kristina, straight pool, 123 balls (her run can be viewed on YouTube)
Jasmin Ouschan, straight pool, 120 balls (her brother Albin is also a world champion pool player; in 2008 Jasmin finished third in a major men's tournament, defeating Mikka Immonen and Oliver Ortmann)
William Clearwater, straight pool, 118 balls in an early straight pool exhibition
Line Kvoersvik aka "Eye Chart", straight pool, 116 balls
Con Stanbury, snooker, 113 balls, first century in 1922
Jake Schaefer, 18-inch balkline (no shot in), 111 balls
Gerda Hofstatter, straight pool, 106 balls in a league match in NYC in 2002

Arnaldo
 
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