Common mistakes a lot of average players make.

Konrad

Your wushu is weak!
thinking getting the 8 ball is a good spot.

For 1 on this. Next time you are getting a ball don’t take the 8. Try to take a different ball. Like the 3 or 4.
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
I see very many "average" players messing up position because they don't have a placement "goal" for the cue ball.

I also see a LOT of players with a lack of focus.
 

Konrad

Your wushu is weak!
3 railing the 11 😂😂😂😂
couldnt help it
Just kidding
En garde. Asking about if the splash might be correct with bottom left and not including the cb position. I’m pretty sure ball goes left and down off third ball not just to the side hitting it that speed…..
 

sjm

Sweating it at Derby City
Silver Member
I think average mistakes means just that, mistakes not player speed. Experienced players may make the same mistakes as a newer player that neither should make.

A mistake does not cease to be a mistake because a player has become a good player in spite of it.
Not what I'm saying. What I'm saying is that each player must have a developmental agenda to advance as a player. I'm suggesting that it is a mistake for an average player to dedicate too much of their practice time to the break in their practice sessions, because an average player has other more immediate developmental needs. Conversely, it would not be a mistake for a 700 Fargo to spend gobs of their practice time on their break, because at that level, the break matters a lot more.

So no, a mistake is not a mistake. For a 530 Fargo playing a 520 Fargo, a dry break isn't really a mistake at all, as it has very little to do with who will win the rack. For this reason, an average player's developmental plan needs to account for this.

When it comes to the conception of a developmental agenda for advancement as a player, what constitutes a mistake in setting that agenda is different depending on one's level of play.
 
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Sealegs50

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
While I was learning to play 9-ball and was a C level player, I was taught that it was a mistake to try to run out from the break. The guy giving me that advice pointed out that I was generally capable of running about 5 balls at a time. If I ran the first 5, then most likely, I would be leaving the last 4 for my opponent. He said that I should not even try to run out until the 5 was the lowest numbered ball on the table. Before that, play safe.
 

mikemosconi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
AVERAGE players usually grip the cue too tight and do not have a proper pre shot routine that creates consistency of proper approach and cue delivery to the cue ball. So they miss more often than very good/great players and they cannot move the cue ball effectively either.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... I'm suggesting that it is a mistake for an average player to dedicate too much of their practice time to the break in their practice sessions, because an average player has other more immediate developmental needs. ....
Absolutely. I have seen many players who rarely run a rack but they want to break like Shane. It's pointless to break well if you can't run three balls because you don't know about draw or natural follow angles yet. While the standard refrain is to work on your weaknesses, it's maybe more useful to say work where you will get the largest return. Often that's fundamentals and that's a hard sell because there is no obvious immediate reward.
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Bending or curling their wrists when stroking with a medium and firm stroke.
Keep those knuckles down; instead let your wrist hinge be the only movement.

Too long or too short of a bridge distance contributing to unintended pool cue
deviation striking the cue ball, especially with a draw stroke & extreme English.
 

hotelyorba

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
- Thinking they should make a shot (and should get away with taking it too easy), because they made it in the past.
- Calling external factors as a reason for missing the shot, and never wanting to acknowledge that their own technique might be at fault.
 
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eastcoast_chris

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The main one I see is people switching up their equipment too often.
New shafts, replace perfectly good tips, magic chalk, gadgets, etc.

And, as has been mentioned before, trying to adjust your alignment when already down one the shot (catch myself doing every so often, but luckily I can usually stop myself)
 
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