Gus Szamboti 70's

runout1961

Ecclesiastes Ch. 12: 1-7
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


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bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
well said and i agree 1000%
 

Sealegs50

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Probably good that I sold the Harley.
 

tksix

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I am now more depressed!!

you are correct on all accounts.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Sounds about right but I still think the high end and rare cues will still be desirable. I'm talking about the $25,000 cues, not $2,500. Now, if Denny Glenn liquidates that's going to hurt values for awhile at least. I'm looking at the stamp collecting market that fell apart completely but rare stamps are still going for big $.
 

WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Totally agree. Although there are still some collectors, it is shrinking as each notable one dies, and is not being replaced with younger buyers.

It's something like the golf club market. A few decades ago, the famous Macgregor woods and irons were at a premium, sold at auction for high prices. Now you can pick them up for next to nothing, because the market has changed, and collectors are rapidly disappearing.

With respect to pool, much the same thing is happening. People see tournament players playing with new cues with carbon fiber shafts. They're largely not inclined to pay thousands of dollars for collectible wood cues. It's just a sign of the times. Some exceptions, but very few. Some desirable makers, Searing, Hercek, a few others, but the market for collectible cues in general is declining. This thread should serve as an indication of that.
 

classiccues

Don't hashtag your broke friends
Silver Member
Totally agree. Although there are still some collectors, it is shrinking as each notable one dies, and is not being replaced with younger buyers.

It's something like the golf club market. A few decades ago, the famous Macgregor woods and irons were at a premium, sold at auction for high prices. Now you can pick them up for next to nothing, because the market has changed, and collectors are rapidly disappearing.

With respect to pool, much the same thing is happening. People see tournament players playing with new cues with carbon fiber shafts. They're largely not inclined to pay thousands of dollars for collectible wood cues. It's just a sign of the times. Some exceptions, but very few. Some desirable makers, Searing, Hercek, a few others, but the market for collectible cues in general is declining. This thread should serve as an indication of that.
The only thing this thread should tell people is that when people with more knowledge than you possess, say something, you should listen.

JV
 

WildWing

Super Gun Mod
Silver Member
The only thing this thread should tell people is that when people with more knowledge than you possess, say something, you should listen.

JV
Agree with you Joe. I hope you weren't referring to me specifically, as I've been a cue collector for some 50 years.

All the best,
WW
 
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Logdog

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


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Sounds depressing but also possibly very accurate
 
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fjk

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Probably 75% of todays pool players have never even heard of any of the names you guys are mentioning. The value is now. Like Mr. Prout said, he sold one for $55k earlier this year. That’s great. But ten or 15 years from now that cue would never sell for $55k. Will, what was the age of the person that bought it?

For those of you holding out hoping your kids or grandkids are going to make a fortune are going to leave them holding the bag. Especially nowadays with the ivory ban as that road narrows even more and becomes more restrictive in the future years. How many cues can you count in the wanted for sale section that have been sitting for months that wouldn’t last a week 10 years ago?

These kids coming up nowadays don’t give a shit about this stuff. Ask Denny Glenn how many takers he’s had to open a museum for his family’s collection. Probably none because nobody would ever go. How many visitors does the antique billiard museum in Colorado actually get per year that go in just to look at the cool stuff they have? Better yet, how many of those visitors are under 30 years old and go out of their way to visit without being dragged along by their dad or grandfather? The ICCS is the same thing. How many attendees of the ICCS are under 30 years old and actually take time out of their schedules and spend the money to attend that event?

Trust me, it’s sad. I love cues, cases and memorabilia more than anyone will ever know. But the attention spans nowadays have shortened significantly. Why do you think YouTube shorts and Facebook reels are so popular? Why would a 20-25 year old kid wait two years and pay $2500k plus for a cue when he can sit on the couch and get a carbon fiber shaft in three days, save the money and put whatever extra cash they have into video games and crypto? Or spend the extra cash they have on experiences instead of spending that kind of money on a cue?

This is just like collector cars. As people age, certain eras of cars become less popular. Pre war cars are tanking. Know why? The people that collected them are dying off. 50’s, 60’s and 70’s muscle cars are next. Luckily, you still have people in the 40’s that still love that era of cars but not as originals, but restomods. But that era is next as the kids that had certain cars on their wall grow up and certain decades of cars become more collectible as the older cars lose their value.

And I don’t want to hear the argument about the younger generation not having the money to spend on cues worth $10k plus and that’s the reason the older guys buy up all the high end end stuff. Between crypto and YouTube and other avenues of revenue generating social media, these younger guys have more money now than ever before. They can afford these cues too. They just don’t care about your precious one of one monster black boar with tons of ivory that took five years to complete. Who cares? That’s the attitude of these guys today. They don’t care.

The hardcore, old school collectors of yesteryear need to wake up and realize the cue market is dying.


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Hmmmm, I'm afraid I don't agree.

Look at the high-end / collectable watch market. I currently own a smart watch that always keeps perfect time and I can read my emails and make phone calls from it (as well as my BP, pulse, EKG, sleep patterns...etc.). However, there's still people out there spending five and six figures on watches that can only tell the time. I've heard Rolex can't even keep up with all their orders. My point is, there will always be those that want a status symbol or something hand made by craftsman. It's a big world out there.
 
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