Help buying first cue

7stud

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It is. I hesitated too long.
You just started looking, so you couldn't be expected to pull the trigger so fast on a new cue. By the way, you should realize that no pool cue sells for the full retail price--they are all discounted, and every retailer will discount the cue the exact same amount. In this case, Seybert's, which is highly regarded on azbilliards, was offering an additional discount on cues that Pechauer is probably discontinuing.

Here's a Players PURE X HXT30 POOL CUE, which has points and blue highlights, for just under $200:

https://www.pooldawg.com/pool-cues/cues-by-style/lifetime-warranty-cues/players-hxt30-pool-cue

The description is incomplete, but at least some of what you see are inlays. I would investigate further.

Also, pooldawg says that they will let you return a used cue for up to 60 days for a credit or refund, so if you hate a cue that you buy there, or it starts falling apart, you can return it. Also, see their buying guide here:

https://www.pooldawg.com/article/pooldawg-library/pool-cue-buying-guide
 
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Enigma86

Registered
You just started looking, so you couldn't be expected to pull the trigger so fast on a new cue. By the way, you should realize that no pool cue sells for the full retail price--they are all discounted, and every retailer will discount the cue the exact same amount.

Right. I'm aware. I just liked the look is all. At first I was looking to make a purchase as soon as possible, but after I starting digging, that went away. Though I know as soon as I have to play again Tuesday I'm gonna be walking away with a renewed sense of urgency.

I've actually since reconsidered on the Pechauers, someone made a good point about their joint and how that limits me in the future with trying out different shafts. Not saying I'm fully out about them, but I really do like versatility. I don't usually like feeling stuck in a brand.

I actually found a pure-x HXT for 40 dollars on facebook, I might pick it up just as another cue to try along with whatever I spend more money on. I'm sure I can get rid of it again for 40.
 

SSDiver2112

2b || !2b t^ ?
Right. I'm aware. I just liked the look is all. At first I was looking to make a purchase as soon as possible, but after I starting digging, that went away. Though I know as soon as I have to play again Tuesday I'm gonna be walking away with a renewed sense of urgency.

I've actually since reconsidered on the Pechauers, someone made a good point about their joint and how that limits me in the future with trying out different shafts. Not saying I'm fully out about them, but I really do like versatility. I don't usually like feeling stuck in a brand.

I actually found a pure-x HXT for 40 dollars on facebook, I might pick it up just as another cue to try along with whatever I spend more money on. I'm sure I can get rid of it again for 40.


As a Pechauer cheerleader I wanted to point out that you can get their joint on most shafts if that is your worry.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
I actually found a pure-x HXT for 40 dollars on facebook, I might pick it up just as another cue to try along with whatever I spend more money on. I'm sure I can get rid of it again for 40.

IF that cue rolls straight and isn't all beat to hell, in your position (no cue but needing one, and no idea what you preferences are yet and taking shots in the dark no matter what you do, and wanting to keep it relatively cheap) I would buy that cue YESTERDAY. Maybe even if it is beat up as long as it rolls fairly straight, hard to find even a used cue of usable quality for $40, especially anything lower deflection.

It gets a cue into your hands that with a well manicured tip would almost certainly be better than the bad condition house cues you are currently having to use, and for the cost of just a couple of lunches. It allows you to try out a low deflection shaft for CHEAP (many people absolutely love them, many people absolutely hate them, but you get to find out real cheap for yourself). If you don't love it you can always keep it as a backup cue to whatever else you end up with, again for the measly cost of just a couple of lunches. Or like you said, if it isn't in terrible shape it would be difficult not to get your $40 back out of it if you wanted to sell. Do not hesitate, buy it tonight.

If you decide to still search for another playing cue also to compare and see which you like better, or because you don't end up liking that one, or because you want two cues with one as a backup, or for whatever other reason, here is another suggestion that should speed up your cue search now that you know the names of some brands in your price range that have decent or better quality. Do most of the searching for which models you like on the manufacturer websites first where you can quickly see all of them in one place, and then once you find all the models that look appealing to you do a google search to see which retail sites have the best deals on those particular models. That should make the process much quicker, easier, and more efficient.

Keep in mind that the MRSP’s are sometimes higher than the actual retail “street” prices so if your budget is say $225, on the manufacturer websites you may be able to look at cues up to $275 or $300 MSRP or something. You’ll quickly get the feel for how much they are typically discounted on the retail sites, and of course sometimes they will be on sale as well.

As mentioned before I would probably be choosing between Pechauer, McDermott, and Schmelke because these three are all:

-Good quality cues, and at the very top end of quality for that price range
-Made in the USA
-Are reputable and respected companies in business for many decades
-Have lifetime warranties that are the best or among the best out there (the warranties only apply to the original owner when bought from a licensed dealer)
-Those brands generally have pretty decent designs to choose from in that price range
-They have shaft stiffness’ and “hits” that are not too far at either extreme end of the spectrum, ie not too whippy, or not super stiff which probably means you are less likely to absolutely end up hating the way one of them feels or plays and you should be able to adjust to it pretty well since you said your goal is to make yourself get used to it and to hopefully play with it for a while (although I can’t recall Shmelke’s hit with great detail any more but I don’t recall it being on the extreme end of stiffness or anything—somebody correct me if I misremember)

https://pechauer.com/
https://www.schmelkecue.com/
http://www.mcdermottcue.com/

Many of the other brands mentioned in this thread meet many of those criteria too, they just don't meet all of them at once like the above three brands do, but all the things that are important to you may be different so of course expand accordingly as needed.

You are right in that having a proprietary joint pin limits your future shaft options so you have to decide if you are likely to want to experiment with various aftermarket shafts in the future. If you are then a proprietary joint probably isn't the way to go.
 
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Johnny Rosato

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I too, agree with ~
Schmelke - $
McDermott - $$
Pechauer - $$$

Personally, I would choose McD or Pech for a little more $
 

Hunter

The King of Memes
Silver Member
I just bought a couple of McDermotts from the L Series for my kids. They are a low end offering ($55-100) but seem very solid. They are just not real ornate. Here are the ones I bought for $55 each (new).
 

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ddg45

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ok I'm going to apologize again as I wanted to use a bunch of quotes to respond to everybody since I've received such an overwhelming amount of help and support. So I'll answer some of the things generically since I can't figure that out (so much for a computer science degree huh? lol).

Yeah I know it's weird I don't have a stick yet or have never really gotten one. I guess I just never figured I needed it. I could get what I needed done with whatever cues we had gotten with our table and set. I rarely lost to anybody I ever played really. They were decent for house cues, much better than the crud I'm having to use right now. Probably 14mm tip and shaped like a silver dollar. I'm not entirely sold as to just how much I'll stay involved or push myself to get better. But I will say getting beat has kinda lit a fire under my ass. I've never had to stomach losses as much as I already have in just the last couple of weeks. lol.

Anyways, thank you so much, I'm in disbelief at how much help I've gotten on here. Thank you all for your replies.

Some things I will add here... Preferences I have at this point in my game is that I know that I do NOT like hard tips, though I don't know exactly how hard "hard" is. I'm sure medium is as firm as I want. One thing that I DID like about the pure-x was that it came with the Kamui soft tip on it which was nice since they say those are a little closer to a soft medium. I agree with sticking with pro taper and standard length. I know I don't like WIDE tips so I figured that 12.75 is a good starting point. I also do know that I like the Irish Linen wrap so I'm going to try to stick with that as well.

Can anybody maybe explain to me more about the quality increases from going from pure-x to going to a schmelke or Mcdermott or the Pechauer? Is it all in the designing or is it actually in the quality and feel of the stick? It seems like if I pop over the 200 dollar mark I can get a cue that isn't sticker and has real inlays I guess? I see maybe down the road if I wanted I could then instead just upgrade the shaft to a LD or something down the road instead of getting an entirely different stick? If that is the case that would be an argument I could get myself behind for paying more upfront because something with lower quality design I wouldn't necessarily be looking to go put a multi hundred dollar shaft on to, I'd want a whole new stick. Does that make sense?

That Pechauer JP-06 is beautiful. I really like that look.

Oh and one more thing. Also looking for a cheap break cue. I don't know much about it. I don't want to break with those garbage house cues and I don't want to break with whatever new stick (or used) stick I get. Whats the deal with weights on those? I know if I go too heavy I can actually hurt myself on speed. I'm a 6'00 190 lbs guy that works out daily and pitches in the 80 mph range so I typically have a solid break speed I would guess. I don't know at what weight my speed would be limited. Any input on that front would be more than appreciated as well. Though I'm definitely looking more to pay the money into the primary stick.
Part of the cost going from Pure-X to an American made cue is, well, made in America. Probably better quality American maple, and real inlays and points instead of "decals" found on less expensive cues. Honestly, lots of pretty good players, if they're blindfolded, would have a hard time telling the difference. You should try to borrow or at least hit with lots of different brands. I went through this 3 years ago when I started to play seriously and I discovered balance point, butt diameter, handle type (I tried linen wrap, leather, and no wrap and discovered I like wrapless cues) all matter, and I played with Players, pure-X, Lucasi, Meucci, OB, McDermott, Schmelke, and found what I liked best in the Pechauer Pro Series. I probably could play about as well with any of them, but I could afford to try everything so that's what I did and am comfortable about not trying any new brands. I think you should start inexpensive until you learn what you really like, and then buy something you not only play your best with, but love to look at.
 

cubswin

Just call me Joe...
Silver Member
I have a bob Owen sneaky I’d sell at a reasonable amount. Pm me if interested.

Think it would make a great first or 100th cue.
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
I think the part of the reason they are so cheap is they
don't have the lifetime warranty that Mcdermott offers
on their other cues.

http://www.mcdermottcue.com/mcdermott_pool_cue_warranty.php

It is that and also the fact that the ones from that line (Lucky) are made in China. Here is how their lines break down:

The cues sold under the McDermott brand are made in the USA, have a full lifetime warranty, and that includes for warpage as well (very few manufacturers cover warpage).

Those they sell under their "Star" brand are made in China, also have a full lifetime warranty, but the warranty does not cover warpage for this line (and any "inlays" are decals).

Those they sell under their "Lucky" brand are made in China, come with only a three year warranty, and the warranty does not cover warpage (and any "inlays" are decals).

While I have never held either of them, from everything I have heard their Star and Lucky lines are also good values for the money.
 
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briankenobi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It is that and also the fact that the ones from that line (Lucky) are made in China. Here is how their lines break down:

The cues sold under the McDermott brand are made in the USA, have a full lifetime warranty, and that includes for warpage as well (very few manufacturers cover warpage).

Those they sell under their "Star" brand are made in China, also have a full lifetime warranty, but the warranty does not cover warpage for this line (and any "inlays" are decals).

Those they sell under their "Lucky" brand are made in China, come with only a three year warranty, and the warranty does not cover warpage (and any "inlays" are decals).

While I have never held either of them, from everything I have heard their Star and Lucky lines are also good values for the money.

To add one thing on the Lucky and Star lines, the pin in these cues is the same 3/8-10 pin in the majority of their cues. So one could put one of their high performance shafts on a star or a lucky. I saw someone at the SBE one year buy a Lucky cue and blem I-3 shaft and spent less than they would for a brand new shaft. For those that don't want to spend a lot of money, those two are good.
 

Kickin' Chicken

Kick Shot Afficionado
Silver Member
<snip> Honestly, lots of pretty good players, if they're blindfolded, would have a hard time telling the difference. <snip>

I believe *any* player with blindfold on would be terrible at telling which cues were better hitters. :grin-square:

sorry, couldn't resist.

carry on...
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
I saw someone at the SBE one year buy a Lucky cue and blem I-3 shaft and spent less than they would for a brand new shaft.

Since the original poster is new to the cue market and may not know what a "blem" shaft is (especially with the abbreviated slang), that refers to a shaft that is not considered up to the standards to be sold at full cost so the manufacturer marks down the price and sells it as a "blemished" or "seconds" shaft. The blemish is almost always cosmetic, often something like an unsightly mark in the wood such as a sugar stain, and they are typically otherwise functionally and structurally sound. There are a number of manufacturers that sell blemished shafts, particularly the low deflection shaft manufacturers.

Also, to the original poster, follow up with an update if you will and let us know what you ended up going with and your first impressions. Thanks.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Since the original poster is new to the cue market and may not know what a "blem" shaft is (especially with the abbreviated slang), that refers to a shaft that is not considered up to the standards to be sold at full cost so the manufacturer marks down the price and sells it as a "blemished" or "seconds" shaft. The blemish is almost always cosmetic, often something like an unsightly mark in the wood such as a sugar stain, and they are typically otherwise functionally and structurally sound. There are a number of manufacturers that sell blemished shafts, particularly the low deflection shaft manufacturers.

Also, to the original poster, follow up with an update if you will and let us know what you ended up going with and your first impressions. Thanks.


He probably got so confused he took up bowling.
 
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