Help with cue tip contact point.

dquarasr

Registered
Where is the marked miscue limit on the Rempe ball? The limit is commonly understood to be halfway from center to edge of the cue ball, like the blue circle below, but I don't see any mark there...?

EDIT: I found a pic online of a Rempe ball with more lines (is that the other side of the ball?). #3 is the miscue limit (see below)

pj
chgo

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Huh? I thought 5 represents the miscue limit. It’s equivalent to the stripe of a striped ball, which I understood to be the limit. See this image of the Rempe ball.
 

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dquarasr

Registered
Huh? I thought 5 represents the miscue limit. It’s equivalent to the stripe of a striped ball, which I understood to be the limit. See this image of the Rempe ball.
Please ignore this reply. I stand corrected. Patrick is right. 3 is the limit per Dr Dave.
 

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Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Please ignore this reply. I stand corrected. Patrick is right. 3 is the limit per Dr Dave.
Sounds like that misunderstanding might have something to do with your miscue problem...?

P.S. Looks like the red lines on the Rempe ball might accurately show the miscue limits from the “side” of the ball (the left and right in your pic), but not from the “front”.

pj
chgo
 

dquarasr

Registered
Sounds like that misunderstanding might have something to do with your miscue problem...?

P.S. Looks like the red lines on the Rempe ball might accurately show the miscue limits from the “side” of the ball (the left and right in your pic), but not from the “front”.

pj
chgo
Yes I believe it has major influence on my miscues.

That said, I’m still working on applying the other suggestions received in this thread on hitting the CB at my intended point rather than where it typically hits, a bit above where I’m aiming, reducing the intended back spin.
 

The_JV

Local_Pro
For a hard tip I find that more aggressive tools do a better job, something like the "Brad Scuffer" does a good job, but it's very coarse, so use it sparingly and don't try to start any fires ;) :) . Kind of a light twist with light pressure, with the goal being to de-glaze and very very slightly lift the fibers, not to grind away material.
There's probably a whole dedicated sub-forum for this topic, but something to give a go if you don't mind experimenting is a pick.
Screenshot from 2021-02-03 08-57-16.png

I have been using hard tips for nearly 20yrs, and opt for this tool. It roughs the surface by creating pockets and allows chalk to embed. Really no different than anything else in that regard. The bonus is that it does not remove any material like an abrasive and subsequently does not alter the shape.
 

dquarasr

Registered
There's probably a whole dedicated sub-forum for this topic, but something to give a go if you don't mind experimenting is a pick.
View attachment 584060
I have been using hard tips for nearly 20yrs, and opt for this tool. It roughs the surface by creating pockets and allows chalk to embed. Really no different than anything else in that regard. The bonus is that it does not remove any material like an abrasive and subsequently does not alter the shape.
I have one of these. Now, if I can just remember where it is . . . . .
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
There's probably a whole dedicated sub-forum for this topic, but something to give a go if you don't mind experimenting is a pick.
View attachment 584060
I have been using hard tips for nearly 20yrs, and opt for this tool. It roughs the surface by creating pockets and allows chalk to embed. Really no different than anything else in that regard. The bonus is that it does not remove any material like an abrasive and subsequently does not alter the shape.
I have one of these. Now, if I can just remember where it is . . . . .
I've used one every day before I play for the past couple of decades - no problems as long as you "poke" it straight in and pull it straight out. I hit my tip 20 or so times with it.

pj
chgo
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
I’m still working on applying the other suggestions received in this thread on hitting the CB at my intended point rather than where it typically hits, a bit above where I’m aiming, reducing the intended back spin.
You're aware that the tip hits the ball on its edge when using max english, right? For example, with max draw the tip's top edge hits the ball.

pj
chgo
 

The_JV

Local_Pro
I've used one every day before I play for the past couple of decades - no problems as long as you "poke" it straight in and pull it straight out. I hit my tip 20 or so times with it.
Yep same... When playing seriously, I'll condition the tip before every set. Just for sake of the routine so I wouldn't forget.
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
There's probably a whole dedicated sub-forum for this topic, but something to give a go if you don't mind experimenting is a pick.
View attachment 584060
I have been using hard tips for nearly 20yrs, and opt for this tool. It roughs the surface by creating pockets and allows chalk to embed. Really no different than anything else in that regard. The bonus is that it does not remove any material like an abrasive and subsequently does not alter the shape.
I forgot to mention this, I also use it when less aggressive treatment is required. Very good tool.
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
Shaping a 13mm tip to the roundness of a U.S. nickel coin gets the tip very close to the shape of the cue ball equator itself, maximizing control and feel for most. Some shape to a dime to get more zip (with their particular stroke and cue) on the ball.
 

dquarasr

Registered
Shaping a 13mm tip to the roundness of a U.S. nickel coin gets the tip very close to the shape of the cue ball equator itself, maximizing control and feel for most. Some shape to a dime to get more zip (with their particular stroke and cue) on the ball.
If a nickel roundness is very close to the shape of a cue ball, a nickel would be 2.25 inches in diameter.......
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
Shaping a 13mm tip to the roundness of a U.S. nickel coin gets the tip very close to the shape of the cue ball equator itself,
If a nickel roundness is very close to the shape of a cue ball, a nickel would be 2.25 inches in diameter.......
Here's a comparison of nickel and ball curvatures on a 13 MM tip (enlarged for clarity).

A tip with a curvature anywhere near that of a ball would be far too flat. In order to reach the miscue limit without playing on (or past) the edge of your tip you need at least 60 degrees of arc in the tip's curvature - you get that with a nickel or dime shape, but with a ball shape you can barely reach half that far before hitting on the tip's edge and risking miscues.

pj
chgo

nickel vs ball.jpg
 
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Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've used one every day before I play for the past couple of decades - no problems as long as you "poke" it straight in and pull it straight out. I hit my tip 20 or so times with it.

pj
chgo
Why? Just chalk between each shot and you should be fine. I stopped fidgeting with my tip 20 years ago and can probably count the miscues on two hands. I don't play with real hard tips so maybe that makes a difference.
 

BilliardsAbout

BondFanEvents.com
Silver Member
Here's a comparison of nickel and ball curvatures on a 13 MM tip (enlarged for clarity).

A tip with a curvature anywhere near that of a ball would be far too flat. In order to reach the miscue limit without playing on (or past) the edge of your tip you need at least 60 degrees of arc in the tip's curvature - you get that with a nickel or dime shape, but with a ball shape you can barely reach half that far before hitting on the tip's edge and risking miscues.

pj
chgo

View attachment 584195
1) "Very near" and "nowhere near" are subjective terms. Stop being a pedant, anyone who knows the game well uses rounded tips, not flat tips.

2) Speaking of subjective, place the edge of the nickel in your diagram at "A" touching "B" so that it's top sits atop the ball's equator . . .

1612533245609.png


. . . and we'll see you are stretching the truth, and . . .

3) We all avoid using the edges of the tip anyway, near the miscue limit.

4) I wonder how many books Bob owns that advocate shaping to a nickel coin? But what do pros know? And countless strong amateurs shape to a nickel. You consistently tell everyone you know more than the pros.

5) If I looked at your cue tip now, it will almost surely sit somewhere between a nickel and a dime shape, depending on preference. So give us a "break" (pun intended).

--Thanks for the correction on the curvature at any size tip. You are certainly correct. Now play nice with the other children today.
 
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