J pechauer Cues , Are they decent for a Custom Cue or just another Factory deal

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I agree with you. Lucasi may be one of the better value cues for the money, but placing them ahead of Mezz and Pechauer for quality and playability, really?

Teds ranking is based on play ability only,not quality.
I have played with and hit more cues then I can remember the past 60 years all the way from several Szambotis all the way down to my lowly Schmelke.

My Lucasi and the Schmelke are not far off in play ability from the very top cues from a lot of legendary makers.
With out doing a lot of thinking the best hitting cues I have tried were a Josey,Southwest and a Tad.
I always thought Szambotis were a bit too stiff for my liking.
I'm going to give an honorable mention to a cue I recently hit balls with.
It was a 100 year old Brunswick Butterfly conversion done by Doug,Teds room mate.
Not only a nicely done cue but the hit was great.

I told my wife how impressed I was with Doug's cue and she said buy it.
I have 3 cues now,I'm not a collector but a player.
If we get another round of Donald dollars i might do it,if he still has it.
 

Duane Remick

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I fell out of my chair ; I CAN'T GET UP

You put Lucasi as number 4?
I almost fell out of my chair.
You surprised me there Ted.
I have a Lucasi and it's a great cue.

:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

Lucasi been making really good cues,
From the beginning.
Pretty sure the Asian folk employed Billy Stroud as consultant-
Machines, wood selection and of course Cue Construction :smile:
 

jokrswylde

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hello ,

I have been seeing these for a while for sale and see them frequently on Open Billiards for sale. Does anyone have any experience with these . Just out of Curiosity , I have never shot with one. I see them as Custom Cues , But that term seems to be used pretty loose these days. I am not looking at any particular model just wondered if they are decent cues for the money . I seen on their website that they also sell cases. They had some 50th anniversary cues that looked really nice but were sold out but it said they were built like they were building in the 70's . Thanks

I think everyone has different criteria for what makes them like a cue. I have four peaches, and I love them all. I had an opportunity to hit most of the major production cues and the peach felt the best by far.

I like that it is a small, American owned business. I like the fact that if I call them with a question, I am most likely to get one of 2 or 3 people every single time. I like the fact that they support amateur pool players.

"Quite a few"?? Care to name some? I'm no Pech homer but they make great cues. IMO Mezz is tops as far as production goes. I'd put Pech and Schon, maybe Predator together and then the rest.

I think he had a bad experience with a cue that didnt hit good at all, and I dont think the players in his city think very highly of them...I think that is what I remember from a thread a few years ago. My apologies if I am mis- remembering
 

cuesblues

cue accumulator
Gold Member
Silver Member
:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

Lucasi been making really good cues,
From the beginning.
Pretty sure the Asian folk employed Billy Stroud as consultant-
Machines, wood selection and of course Cue Construction :smile:

Lucasi has has improved a great deal in the last few years.
Nothing like the old Lucasi cues, although measuremans old electronic store Lucasi is a good one.
 

j2pac

Marital Slow Learner.
Gold Member
Silver Member
In order of playability based on my opinion, and years of dealing with cues everyday.

Schon
Jacoby
Predator
Lucasi
Mezz
Mcdermott
Meucci
Pechauer

Love you Ted, but Mezz is hands down imo, the best production cue for the money....and certainly better than Lucasi. :wink:
 

cuesblues

cue accumulator
Gold Member
Silver Member
Love you Ted, but Mezz is hands down imo, the best production cue for the money....and certainly better than Lucasi. :wink:

I don't like the way those Mezz shafts hit, WX-WD whatever, and the designs are really tired.
The Lucasi Flexpoint shaft 12.75 mm hits really good for a low priced shaft.
Mezz quality is top notch, but so is Lucasi.
You can't compare old Lucasi cues to the new cues, just like Mezz.
The Predator Group has done a good job with the Lucasi line.
 

gregnice37

Bar Banger, Cue Collector
Silver Member
I don't like the way those Mezz shafts hit, WX-WD whatever, and the designs are really tired.
The Lucasi Flexpoint shaft 12.75 mm hits really good for a low priced shaft.
Mezz quality is top notch, but so is Lucasi.
You can't compare old Lucasi cues to the new cues, just like Mezz.
The Predator Group has done a good job with the Lucasi line.

You aren't lying about the Mezz design. I went on the site to possibly pick one to get the ignite to try out and the design was lacking. Then the couple that were okay had ss joints that I can't stand. Plus ever wrap is linen, yuck. All the wrapless have boring looks. I couldn't pick anything. I even looked at the available Exceeds and the cheapest one was $2900+ without the ignite.
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
Hello ,

I have been seeing these for a while for sale and see them frequently on Open Billiards for sale. Does anyone have any experience with these . Just out of Curiosity , I have never shot with one. I see them as Custom Cues , But that term seems to be used pretty loose these days. I am not looking at any particular model just wondered if they are decent cues for the money . I seen on their website that they also sell cases. They had some 50th anniversary cues that looked really nice but were sold out but it said they were built like they were building in the 70's . Thanks

I'm going to give you two truths almost nobody else is going to tell you and most don't even realize.

First, there really is no such thing as a "custom" or "production" cue, at least as far as brands go. No matter what reasonable definition you can try to come up with for "custom", there will be many cues that everybody considers and calls production that fully meet the definition of custom, and vice versa. If you don't believe me go ahead and try. The "custom" and "production" labels have more to do with peoples perceptions of a cue's prestige and popularity than anything concrete, although production numbers are often considered in a vague and non precise way as well. I mention this only because unless resale value is a major consideration (where people's perceptions will matter more than facts), I wouldn't worry too much about whether it is considered custom or production. Just judge each cue on its own for quality, hit, and feel without regard for what it is considered, and if resale value is also important only then go ahead and take whether it is generally considered by most to be custom or production into consideration too.

I'm going to continue using those terms like everybody else, but they are pretty meaningless other than being a reflection of the general consensus for the prestige in which they are held about the same way that a certain brand of jeans might be considered more prestigious than levi's even though they are made to the same quality standard using the same material and have the same cut and are made in the same factory as levi's, but not for any other really good reason other than they are popular because they are popular.

Second, there is no such thing as a good or bad hitting or playing cue. There is a such thing as a good hitting or playing cue for YOU, but no cue is somehow intrinsically good or bad hitting. Its all personal preference. The very highest levels of pool that can possibly be played, near perfect pool, has been played with hard hitting cues,soft hitting cues, stiff hitting cues, whippy cues, etc. Cues are kind of like food, and saying a cue is good hitting or bad hitting is the equivalent of saying sardines are good tasting or bad tasting. Well to one guy they are good tasting, but to the next guy they are bad tasting, and they are both right because it is only a matter of personal preference. So asking for people's opinions on how cues hit or feel is about like asking people which foods are good or not. Your preferences may be different. You won't know for sure if you will like a cue until you try it, regardless of what somebody else might say, so when possible try the cue or at least another unmodified one of the same brand/shaft type before you buy so you increase the chances you end up liking it, and at the end of the day all that is important is that it suits your tastes and preferences, not somebody else's.

That said, Pechauer cues are of very good quality. They are considered by most people to be production cues, yet the brand would meet most people's definition for custom cues if you asked for their definition of custom. I happen to think they hit decent, they don't blow my socks off but are ok, but my opinion of how they hit should be as important to you as my opinion about sardines.
 
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Charlie Hustle

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm going to give you two truths almost nobody else is going to tell you and most don't even realize.

First, there really is no such thing as a "custom" or "production" cue, at least as far as brands go. No matter what reasonable definition you can try to come up with for "custom", there will be many cues that everybody considers and calls production that fully meet the definition of custom, and vice versa. If you don't believe me go ahead and try. The "custom" and "production" labels have more to do with peoples perceptions of a cue's prestige and popularity than anything concrete, although production numbers are often considered in a vague and non precise way as well. I mention this only because unless resale value is a major consideration (where people's perceptions will matter more than facts), I wouldn't worry too much about whether it is considered custom or production. Just judge each cue on its own for quality, hit, and feel without regard for what it is considered, and if resale value is also important only then go ahead and take whether it is generally considered by most to be custom or production into consideration too.

I'm going to continue using those terms like everybody else, but they are pretty meaningless other than being a reflection of the general consensus for the prestige in which they are held about the same way that a certain brand of jeans might be considered more prestigious than levi's even though they are made to the same quality standard using the same material and have the same cut and are made in the same factory as levi's, but not for any other really good reason other than they are popular because they are popular.

Second, there is no such thing as a good or bad hitting or playing cue. There is a such thing as a good hitting or playing cue for YOU, but no cue is somehow intrinsically good or bad hitting. Its all personal preference. The very highest levels of pool that can possibly be played, near perfect pool, has been played with hard hitting cues,soft hitting cues, stiff hitting cues, whippy cues, etc. Cues are kind of like food, and saying a cue is good hitting or bad hitting is the equivalent of saying sardines are good tasting or bad tasting. Well to one guy they are good tasting, but to the next guy they are bad tasting, and they are both right because it is only a matter of personal preference. So asking for people's opinions on how cues hit or feel is about like asking people which foods are good or not. Your preferences may be different. You won't know for sure if you will like a cue until you try it, regardless of what somebody else might say, so when possible try the cue or at least another unmodified one of the same brand/shaft type before you buy so you increase the chances you end up liking it, and at the end of the day all that is important is that it suits your tastes and preferences, not somebody else's.

That said, Pechauer cues are of very good quality. They are considered by most people to be production cues, yet the brand would meet most people's definition for custom cues if you asked for their definition of custom. I happen to think they hit decent, they don't blow my socks off but are ok, but my opinion of how they hit should be as important to you as my opinion about sardines.

I was basically going to say what you said. But I will add, this is why you are going to get so many opinions in a thread like this.
 

HNTFSH

Birds, Bass & Bottoms
Gold Member
Silver Member
I'm going to give you two truths almost nobody else is going to tell you and most don't even realize.

First, there really is no such thing as a "custom" or "production" cue, at least as far as brands go. No matter what reasonable definition you can try to come up with for "custom", there will be many cues that everybody considers and calls production that fully meet the definition of custom, and vice versa. If you don't believe me go ahead and try. The "custom" and "production" labels have more to do with peoples perceptions of a cue's prestige and popularity than anything concrete, although production numbers are often considered in a vague and non precise way as well. I mention this only because unless resale value is a major consideration (where people's perceptions will matter more than facts), I wouldn't worry too much about whether it is considered custom or production. Just judge each cue on its own for quality, hit, and feel without regard for what it is considered, and if resale value is also important only then go ahead and take whether it is generally considered by most to be custom or production into consideration too.

I'm going to continue using those terms like everybody else, but they are pretty meaningless other than being a reflection of the general consensus for the prestige in which they are held about the same way that a certain brand of jeans might be considered more prestigious than levi's even though they are made to the same quality standard using the same material and have the same cut and are made in the same factory as levi's, but not for any other really good reason other than they are popular because they are popular.

Second, there is no such thing as a good or bad hitting or playing cue. There is a such thing as a good hitting or playing cue for YOU, but no cue is somehow intrinsically good or bad hitting. Its all personal preference. The very highest levels of pool that can possibly be played, near perfect pool, has been played with hard hitting cues,soft hitting cues, stiff hitting cues, whippy cues, etc. Cues are kind of like food, and saying a cue is good hitting or bad hitting is the equivalent of saying sardines are good tasting or bad tasting. Well to one guy they are good tasting, but to the next guy they are bad tasting, and they are both right because it is only a matter of personal preference. So asking for people's opinions on how cues hit or feel is about like asking people which foods are good or not. Your preferences may be different. You won't know for sure if you will like a cue until you try it, regardless of what somebody else might say, so when possible try the cue or at least another unmodified one of the same brand/shaft type before you buy so you increase the chances you end up liking it, and at the end of the day all that is important is that it suits your tastes and preferences, not somebody else's.

That said, Pechauer cues are of very good quality. They are considered by most people to be production cues, yet the brand would meet most people's definition for custom cues if you asked for their definition of custom. I happen to think they hit decent, they don't blow my socks off but are ok, but my opinion of how they hit should be as important to you as my opinion about sardines.

:thumbup2::thumbup2:

It's always intrigued me, the romanticism around pool cues. Not that there's anything wrong with it, it's just humorous sometimes how beliefs are shaped from it. And like most things, some are more afflicted than others.

I get the whole "handcrafted" moreso than others thing, knives being another example. Do they cut any better? They probably do in some peoples MINDS.

And all that's OK, it's part of the fun and allure. Any number of things can legitimately make up someone's impression but there's a whole lot of imagination versus fact that seems given more weight.

It reads the OP wants a "custom cue" at a "production" price. Regardless of definition, that wouldn't be the driver for me as it plays more into feeding ego and imagination than anything else. Not a criticism, but worth checking ones self.

Enjoyed reading all the opinions and I'll go sulk now that my McDermott never made the top 4 "production cues" list. :crying:
 

j2pac

Marital Slow Learner.
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't like the way those Mezz shafts hit, WX-WD whatever, and the designs are really tired.
The Lucasi Flexpoint shaft 12.75 mm hits really good for a low priced shaft.
Mezz quality is top notch, but so is Lucasi.
You can't compare old Lucasi cues to the new cues, just like Mezz.
The Predator Group has done a good job with the Lucasi line.

No disrespect to Lucasi intended. They are a decent cue. The Mezz Cocobolo sneaky that I had, was just in a different league IMO. Just one of those cues I regret ever selling. I do realize that these things are subjective however.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't like the way those Mezz shafts hit, WX-WD whatever, and the designs are really tired.
The Lucasi Flexpoint shaft 12.75 mm hits really good for a low priced shaft.
Mezz quality is top notch, but so is Lucasi.
You can't compare old Lucasi cues to the new cues, just like Mezz.
The Predator Group has done a good job with the Lucasi line.
Predator has nothing to do with Lucasi. The cues are made in same factory but they are not owned by same co's. Lucasi is a brand owned by Cue-n-Case. The name came from owner Jim Lucas. That factory in China makes Pred, ADAM, Lucasi, Dufferin, Universal, Players just to name a few.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

Lucasi been making really good cues,
From the beginning.
Pretty sure the Asian folk employed Billy Stroud as consultant-
Machines, wood selection and of course Cue Construction :smile:

Bill Stroud told me in an e-mail that Lucasi makes a great cue and he spent 7 years off and on at the Chinese factory showing them how to make the Lucasi cues.
I will tell you this that when I had the leather wrap replaced on my Lucasi with linen(dont like leather) we found that the handle was constructed with pie shaped wood rather then one solid piece.
I had cue maker Chris Byrne do the linen and he said they do that to give the cue a more solid hit.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The points aren't sharp, as a result they look cheap to me.

I hate rounded points.
Would not buy a cue with them.
You can buy a $129 Chines cue with sharp points.
So it can't be that hard or expensive.
It's just another example of dumbing down the buyers.
 

cuesblues

cue accumulator
Gold Member
Silver Member
Predator has nothing to do with Lucasi. The cues are made in same factory but they are not owned by same co's. Lucasi is a brand owned by Cue-n-Case. The name came from owner Jim Lucas. That factory in China makes Pred, ADAM, Lucasi, Dufferin, Universal, Players just to name a few.

I got Lucasi confused with something else.
Still in the last few years they have really improved in several ways.
The hybrid cue I had was outstanding and it was one of the nicer production cues I've owned.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I hate rounded points.
Would not buy a cue with them.
You can buy a $129 Chines cue with sharp points.
So it can't be that hard or expensive.
It's just another example of dumbing down the buyers.
Rounded points have nothing to do with quality of the cue. IIRC Schon went to them yrs ago and it didn't hurt how they hit one bit. Its just a style/aesthetic choice. Some of the asian cues i've seen with sharp points are done quite well and others are really bad.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Rounded points have nothing to do with quality of the cue. IIRC Schon went to them yrs ago and it didn't hurt how they hit one bit. Its just a style/aesthetic choice. Some of the asian cues i've seen with sharp points are done quite well and others are really bad.

I know rounded points do not affect quality or the hit of a cue.
It's just the lazy and quick way to make a cue.
And people pay thousands for them.
I just dont like them,they look unfinished.
I would rather have bad sharp points then rounded ones.
Each to his own.
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I know rounded points do not affect quality or the hit of a cue.
It's just the lazy and quick way to make a cue.
And people pay thousands for them.
I just dont like them,they look unfinished.
I would rather have bad sharp points then rounded ones.
Each to his own.
A lot of sharp-pointed cues are made by the exact same CNC equipment. Its like a couple extra steps and people pay thousands for them thinking they were cut by hand. True full-splice cues are a whole different story. Almost all pointed cues are half-splice and are easily made rounded or sharp. I like sharp points also but won't pay the big up-charge unless its a true full-splice.
 
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