Major Advantage Of Being Cross Dominant?

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
On my journey to soak up as much information as possible on how the eyes work I used to sift through shooting videos on YouTube. I watched several videos on shooting a pistol. Guys kept saying if you were cross dominant to have the gun in the holster on the side of the dominant eye. If I ever shot a pistol, I am right handed and left eye dominant so I would have the gun on my left hip. Then bring it over left to right until it came in line with my vision centre. They kept saying that this ensured you got the gun on line faster and meant less interference from the weaker eye, less movement of the head as it passes the weaker eye in a struggle to get the vision centre over the sights. More bring the sights to the vision centre, not the vision centre to the sights.

I thought about this as I found it really intriguing. Would this be an advantage for cross dominant pool players? I now do this exact thing with a pool cue on every shot and my alignment has become near perfect. No wiggling and altering once down to perfect the alignment... It's set and on target right away. I start with the grip hand and bridge hand outside of my vision centre to the left (because I'm left eye dominant) and bring the grip onto my line of aim through my vision centre and my bridge. Something goes off in my head telling me to stop and I know instantly when my hands are on my line of aim through the vision centre.

As a right hander my natural way was to bring the grip hand right to left, and the bridge hand left to right. I did struggle somewhat with judging if the grip was on line. Purely because it's coming from my weaker eyes side. I urge anyone who is cross dominant to give it a try and post how they found it.

Do you think it could be an advantage to someone being cross dominant? Thoughts?
 

Cardigan Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This is all interesting and I look forward to the comments on this thread.
I'm also cross dominant, but only aware of it for the last year or so. I still have some habits, especially when fatigued, that I am lined up center chin and when working drills (such as straight in, cross table shots PAT Level 1 standard shot 1), even though I can make the shot the cue ball will have a slight spin on it because I'm lining up center but cueing just left of center.

So then I try to correct it with just my hands and I'm missing to the right of the pocket.

I've noticed if I focus and correct my head position, when cue is slightly to left center chin, I'm now more in line and truly at center cue ball and stroking straight through.

Now it's about a thousand repetitions to make it muscle memory. I'm about there, but when fatigued I slip back to sloppy habits.

Interested to hear from more cross dominant players on this.
 

cookie man

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Have you done any experimenting with the approach on shots? I like starting left of aiming line and moving over till it looks good.
 

Cardigan Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
As a right hander my natural way was to bring the grip hand right to left, and the bridge hand left to right. I did struggle somewhat with judging if the grip was on line. Purely because it's coming from my weaker eyes side. I urge anyone who is cross dominant to give it a try and post how they found it.

Do you think it could be an advantage to someone being cross dominant? Thoughts?

My thoughts on this technique are mixed, because in my training, I was instructed to walk into the shot line, down and extend into the shot-out into the shot like snooker players do.

This has become part of my muscle memory now, but there are times when I will bring the cue into the shot line from the left side. This isn't entirely wrong, but could lead to me getting more out of line in my opinion.
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Have you done any experimenting with the approach on shots? I like starting left of aiming line and moving over till it looks good.
I have. I found it to be easier approaching from the right. This way my vision centre (inside of my left eye) gets on the line of aim before the right eye has a say in the matter.
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My thoughts on this technique are mixed, because in my training, I was instructed to walk into the shot line, down and extend into the shot-out into the shot like snooker players do.

This has become part of my muscle memory now, but there are times when I will bring the cue into the shot line from the left side. This isn't entirely wrong, but could lead to me getting more out of line in my opinion.
I am a snooker player and approach the shot relatively text book. Approaching the shot differently isn't the issue or what I am suggesting. If you notice all the great snooker players they all get their bridge and grip on the line of aim prior to the bridge hitting the table then slide forward to shift the weight balance in their stance and get the tip closer to the white. What I'm. Suggesting is a way to get the cue on line more accurately before you drop down. This way you get both hands on the line of aim accurately before placing the bridge, then you can slide forwards a little if you want.
 

cookie man

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have. I found it to be easier approaching from the right. This way my vision centre (inside of my left eye) gets on the line of aim before the right eye has a say in the matter.

You can also set the cue down on the table in the intended line then refine it by moving your head back and forth a little. Lots of little tricks.
 

cookie man

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I am a snooker player and approach the shot relatively text book. Approaching the shot differently isn't the issue or what I am suggesting. If you notice all the great snooker players they all get their bridge and grip on the line of aim prior to the bridge hitting the table then slide forward to shift the weight balance in their stance and get the tip closer to the white. What I'm. Suggesting is a way to get the cue on line more accurately before you drop down. This way you get both hands on the line of aim accurately before placing the bridge, then you can slide forwards a little if you want.

Sliding in is a great approach. I like that.
 

Cardigan Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I am a snooker player and approach the shot relatively text book. Approaching the shot differently isn't the issue or what I am suggesting. If you notice all the great snooker players they all get their bridge and grip on the line of aim prior to the bridge hitting the table then slide forward to shift the weight balance in their stance and get the tip closer to the white. What I'm. Suggesting is a way to get the cue on line more accurately before you drop down. This way you get both hands on the line of aim accurately before placing the bridge, then you can slide forwards a little if you want.

Ahhh, thanks for the clarification. I see what you are suggesting now.
I'm in the middle of watching Ronnie O in the finals, and he is cross dominant as well.
Watching his visuals while reading your in-depth analysis of the approach is quite the treat.

Many thanks.
 

3andstop

Focus
Silver Member
Years ago I used to subscribe to Billiard Digest and Pool and Billiard magazines. I have mentioned this before that while I can't remember which magazine instructional article it was and from which magazine it appeared in, one of the writers wrote that it is a definite advantage to be cross dominant because when taking your 45 degree stance, your dominant eye leads your shot and is closest to it.

There must be at least one member here with every copy ever made to find the article. LOL
 

336Robin

Multiverse Operative
Gold Member
Silver Member
It makes you pay attention

I think the advantage is when you learn how to get down, hunt and find your aiming line, you are solid on it and really have it. For me it makes everything more solid.

On my journey to soak up as much information as possible on how the eyes work I used to sift through shooting videos on YouTube. I watched several videos on shooting a pistol. Guys kept saying if you were cross dominant to have the gun in the holster on the side of the dominant eye. If I ever shot a pistol, I am right handed and left eye dominant so I would have the gun on my left hip. Then bring it over left to right until it came in line with my vision centre. They kept saying that this ensured you got the gun on line faster and meant less interference from the weaker eye, less movement of the head as it passes the weaker eye in a struggle to get the vision centre over the sights. More bring the sights to the vision centre, not the vision centre to the sights.

I thought about this as I found it really intriguing. Would this be an advantage for cross dominant pool players? I now do this exact thing with a pool cue on every shot and my alignment has become near perfect. No wiggling and altering once down to perfect the alignment... It's set and on target right away. I start with the grip hand and bridge hand outside of my vision centre to the left (because I'm left eye dominant) and bring the grip onto my line of aim through my vision centre and my bridge. Something goes off in my head telling me to stop and I know instantly when my hands are on my line of aim through the vision centre.

As a right hander my natural way was to bring the grip hand right to left, and the bridge hand left to right. I did struggle somewhat with judging if the grip was on line. Purely because it's coming from my weaker eyes side. I urge anyone who is cross dominant to give it a try and post how they found it.

Do you think it could be an advantage to someone being cross dominant? Thoughts?
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
i am cross eye dominant (rh left eye)
with vision center problems
ie unwanted left spin/cue ball slightly right of target
i cant wait to go home and try this at the table
 

Cardigan Kid

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i am cross eye dominant (rh left eye)
with vision center problems
ie unwanted left spin/cue ball slightly right of target
i cant wait to go home and try this at the table

This is exactly what was happening to me. (And still does at times)
In the military, I forced myself to shoot with my right eye, and didn't do that bad, just a few points shy of expert. Being right handed, that's just how I was trained. Right hand weapon, sight with right eye, etc.

However, fast forward to today, I'm still fighting my brain while sighting down a cue and re-learning to find center. When I hit a stun shot, but see that slight rotation on the cue ball, I know I have to re-focus.

On one of Bert Kinister's videos, he mentions that his shots will always have that slight hint of rotation because he strokes just outside of center and understand that-so he has compensated for it his entire career.

But the question is, can it be defeated?
I believe it can, but it takes conscious knowledge that it's there, recognition when it shows up, and proper steps to eliminate it.
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
This is exactly what was happening to me. (And still does at times)
In the military, I forced myself to shoot with my right eye, and didn't do that bad, just a few points shy of expert. Being right handed, that's just how I was trained. Right hand weapon, sight with right eye, etc.

However, fast forward to today, I'm still fighting my brain while sighting down a cue and re-learning to find center. When I hit a stun shot, but see that slight rotation on the cue ball, I know I have to re-focus.

On one of Bert Kinister's videos, he mentions that his shots will always have that slight hint of rotation because he strokes just outside of center and understand that-so he has compensated for it his entire career.

But the question is, can it be defeated?
I believe it can, but it takes conscious knowledge that it's there, recognition when it shows up, and proper steps to eliminate it.
Anything in pool can be cured. Most choose to do it the hard way, on their own and it could take years before they work it out. Once your vision is correct the game becomes so much easier. You learn quicker by trial and error because you consistently hit where you intend, so potting angles become recognisable. No more doubting the angle or any of that.

I remember watching a video by some pro on YouTube and he stated it looked like he was hitting half a tip right, when in fact it was centre and that don't worry if it looks right just make sure it is right in the centre.... Worst advice I've ever heard. If it looks wrong then fix it. No wonder his cue action had a disgusting curve in it. He had programmed his body to compensate by cueing across the ball. It's a miracle he became a pro. Can't remember his name.... I'm sure someone will point it out.
 

Buzzard II

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
OK, I want to address that pistol issue. The last 16 years of my career I taught firearms (pistol, shotgun, subgun) at the police academy. I never, ever, heard anyone say to keep a holster on the dominate eye side, only the dominate hand. What you do is with whatever body alignment or shooting style you use (Weaver-modified Weaver-point shoulder-etc.) you move the weapon to your eye and not tilt your head/eye to the weapon. Its only a two inch shift.

You may have to use a weak side shooting position with shoulder fired weapons if your eye's are really F'd up. Not at all recommended but doable.

On to pool. I am right handed and right eye dominate. Because of all my years shooting I blade my body in a modified Weaver stance. A broken collar bone has something to do with it as well. I find I have to step into this stance lining up with my weak, left eye. As I drop and slide the bridge into position I double check the cue, cue ball, object ball with the left eye, then open both and shoot.

I think you might want to watch those videos again and listen carefully. You might be confusing the strong side term for a dominate eye side. They are different things.
 

Pidge

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
OK, I want to address that pistol issue. The last 16 years of my career I taught firearms (pistol, shotgun, subgun) at the police academy. I never, ever, heard anyone say to keep a holster on the dominate eye side, only the dominate hand. What you do is with whatever body alignment or shooting style you use (Weaver-modified Weaver-point shoulder-etc.) you move the weapon to your eye and not tilt your head/eye to the weapon. Its only a two inch shift.

You may have to use a weak side shooting position with shoulder fired weapons if your eye's are really F'd up. Not at all recommended but doable.

On to pool. I am right handed and right eye dominate. Because of all my years shooting I blade my body in a modified Weaver stance. A broken collar bone has something to do with it as well. I find I have to step into this stance lining up with my weak, left eye. As I drop and slide the bridge into position I double check the cue, cue ball, object ball with the left eye, then open both and shoot.

I think you might want to watch those videos again and listen carefully. You might be confusing the strong side term for a dominate eye side. They are different things.
Definitely heard it correctly. I'll try find the link. It was mentioned that the firearm had less to travel to get in line with the dominant eye.

Either way, it works wonder in pool for my alignment.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
This is exactly what was happening to me. (And still does at times)
In the military, I forced myself to shoot with my right eye, and didn't do that bad, just a few points shy of expert. Being right handed, that's just how I was trained. Right hand weapon, sight with right eye, etc.

However, fast forward to today, I'm still fighting my brain while sighting down a cue and re-learning to find center. When I hit a stun shot, but see that slight rotation on the cue ball, I know I have to re-focus.

On one of Bert Kinister's videos, he mentions that his shots will always have that slight hint of rotation because he strokes just outside of center and understand that-so he has compensated for it his entire career.

But the question is, can it be defeated?
I believe it can, but it takes conscious knowledge that it's there, recognition when it shows up, and proper steps to eliminate it
.
i believe it can be defeated too
with the reasons you mentioned
(and pidge...:smile:)
 

SilverCue

Sir Raksalot
Silver Member
On my journey to soak up as much information as possible on how the eyes work I used to sift through shooting videos on YouTube. I watched several videos on shooting a pistol. Guys kept saying if you were cross dominant to have the gun in the holster on the side of the dominant eye. If I ever shot a pistol, I am right handed and left eye dominant so I would have the gun on my left hip. Then bring it over left to right until it came in line with my vision centre. They kept saying that this ensured you got the gun on line faster and meant less interference from the weaker eye, less movement of the head as it passes the weaker eye in a struggle to get the vision centre over the sights. More bring the sights to the vision centre, not the vision centre to the sights.

I thought about this as I found it really intriguing. Would this be an advantage for cross dominant pool players? I now do this exact thing with a pool cue on every shot and my alignment has become near perfect. No wiggling and altering once down to perfect the alignment... It's set and on target right away. I start with the grip hand and bridge hand outside of my vision centre to the left (because I'm left eye dominant) and bring the grip onto my line of aim through my vision centre and my bridge. Something goes off in my head telling me to stop and I know instantly when my hands are on my line of aim through the vision centre.

As a right hander my natural way was to bring the grip hand right to left, and the bridge hand left to right. I did struggle somewhat with judging if the grip was on line. Purely because it's coming from my weaker eyes side. I urge anyone who is cross dominant to give it a try and post how they found it.

Do you think it could be an advantage to someone being cross dominant? Thoughts?

I tried to give you a greenie but it said I had to spread it around :)
I think you discovered Perfect Aim on your own.
Watch out that GenoMachino don't get you :)
The way you describe this is so simple that even I can understand.
You make some of the best instructional posts on here.
Some posters just try to say what's not right :(
 

SamLambert

Daydreaming about pool
Silver Member
I am cross dominant and suffer slightly from the problem explained.

I'll gladly try this tonight, although I believe I won't see much improvement. In my quest to find my own vision center about 2 months ago, I think I somehow forced myself to be slightly more right eye dominant and now don't have as much difficulty as in the beginning seeing the right alignement.

Hopefully I'm wrong and this will help more than I think!
 
Last edited:

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
Years ago I used to subscribe to Billiard Digest and Pool and Billiard magazines. I have mentioned this before that while I can't remember which magazine instructional article it was and from which magazine it appeared in, one of the writers wrote that it is a definite advantage to be cross dominant because when taking your 45 degree stance, your dominant eye leads your shot and is closest to it.

There must be at least one member here with every copy ever made to find the article. LOL

BD has a search engine for that....I posted it here a few years ago but don't remember the link. There must be at least one member here with every post ever made to find the link.

:grin-square:


Jeff Livingston
 
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