Pool Ball Weights

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Reading the Aramith specs is confusing. The Tournament set talks about 4th generation resin and how great these balls are, then you read the Pro Set has the highest quality resin available, one might think its better.
Only the Tournament's are Duramith. they could use a site update.
 

jtompilot

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Only the Tournament's are Duramith. they could use a site update.
Thats for sure. All I'm saying is Aramith says the Pro Cup is the highest/best grade resin available but that the Tournament balls are the best. Not confusing at all🤯
 

dquarasr

Registered
I just measured my two CBs for kicks. Aramith red measles ball was 167g (it read 168g briefly before settling on 167g).

Rempke training ball surprisingly was only 162g.

I weighed them both more than once to confirm the readings.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I just measured my two CBs for kicks. Aramith red measles ball was 167g (it read 168g briefly before settling on 167g).

Rempke training ball surprisingly was only 162g.

I weighed them both more than once to confirm the readings.
My Rempe is also way light.
 

dquarasr

Registered
I just measured my two CBs for kicks. Aramith red measles ball was 167g (it read 168g briefly before settling on 167g).

Rempke training ball surprisingly was only 162g.

I weighed them both more than once to confirm the readings.
Apologies to Mr. Rempe for misspelling his surname.
 

mrpiper

Registered
Only the Tournament's are Duramith. they could use a site update.
I own Tournament Duramith, Centennials and Arcos II as well as SAP sets. I just absolutely see no difference at all with the only exception being the Arcos set cue ball is the best I have ever owned and even far superior to the duramith for not getting contact marks. I know many here disagree bit if they do, I don't believe they have ever tried and compared them.

I suspect the only measurable improvement with duramith balls would be found by some scientific micro measure of heat generated on the break shot. In real world application there just isn't any difference at least in my experience across all of these top quality sets.

As for weight, my arcos set and now my dynasphere tungsten are the only sets I have owned where all 16 balls weigh out the exact same in grams. The others are close, within 2 grams like 167 to 169 for SAP, my Tournament's are all within 1 gram. I don't recall what the Centennials were but they were very close or I would have remembered the discrepancy
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... all 16 balls weigh out the exact same in grams. ...
If the resolution on your scale is only 1 gram even, it might be misleading you. I think ball weight accuracy is to the point that you need better than 1 gram accuracy, like 0.1 gram, to be sure of the actual weight range.
 

mrpiper

Registered
If the resolution on your scale is only 1 gram even, it might be misleading you. I think ball weight accuracy is to the point that you need better than 1 gram accuracy, like 0.1 gram, to be sure of the actual weight range.
Agreed, but within the range of 1 gram, I am very pleased.
 

DangleShot

New member
I read that if you took a billiard ball and expanded it to be the same size as the earth it would have deeper craters and higher mountains and not be as round
This was pretty interesting to an egghead math guy like me, so I did some math on this on protrusions, depressions, and overall roundness.

• The earth's radius is about 3959 miles.
• The earth's highest mountain above sea level is 5.5 miles high.
• So the highest mountain sticks out above its relative surface .1389%
• The radius of a billiard ball is 1.125 inches
• A bump on the ball that would represent the largest mountain on earth would be .00156 inches high or 1.56 mil (Imperial)
• This equates to .0397 millimeters
• So according to some measurements taken on here, if a billiard ball had measles, raised numbers, stripes, or other imperfections .002 inches out of round (2 mil or .0508mm) that would be like a mountain 7.0438 miles high, or 37,161 feet above sea level, 28% higher.
• Billiard balls with variances of .02 millimeters would be 0.0008 inches (.8 mil) or .0711% or mountains only 2.82 miles high, about half the height of the tallest mountain.
So based on the average of those two readings, we could surmise that a surface of a billiard ball may be precisely about as bumpy as the earth.
Fitting when you think of fractal patterns in nature maybe ;-)

However, if you consider depressions or scratches/chips on a used billiard ball, the lowest land on earth is about 413 meters or .2566 miles below sea level. This would equate to a depression only .07mil or .002 millimeters. An old cue ball I have here has a little ding in it probably .3 millimeters deep. That would equate to a canyon 40 miles below sea level on earth!

As for 'roundness' or sphericity, a billiard ball is probably more perfectly round than the earth. The rotation of the earth causes the earth to be 27 miles wider around the equator than a meridian thru the poles. This would resemble a squatty billiard ball about 1.1 millimeters narrower along one axis versus another, which I think would slightly but noticeably make the ball skitter or wow on the table.

So if I were to do a makeshift Mythbusters impression on here, my assessment of this claim is 'PLAUSIBLE'. :)

Bill
 

dr_dave

Instructional Author
Gold Member
Silver Member
This was pretty interesting to an egghead math guy like me, so I did some math on this on protrusions, depressions, and overall roundness.

• The earth's radius is about 3959 miles.
• The earth's highest mountain above sea level is 5.5 miles high.
• So the highest mountain sticks out above its relative surface .1389%
• The radius of a billiard ball is 1.125 inches
• A bump on the ball that would represent the largest mountain on earth would be .00156 inches high or 1.56 mil (Imperial)
• This equates to .0397 millimeters
• So according to some measurements taken on here, if a billiard ball had measles, raised numbers, stripes, or other imperfections .002 inches out of round (2 mil or .0508mm) that would be like a mountain 7.0438 miles high, or 37,161 feet above sea level, 28% higher.
• Billiard balls with variances of .02 millimeters would be 0.0008 inches (.8 mil) or .0711% or mountains only 2.82 miles high, about half the height of the tallest mountain.
So based on the average of those two readings, we could surmise that a surface of a billiard ball may be precisely about as bumpy as the earth.
Fitting when you think of fractal patterns in nature maybe ;-)

However, if you consider depressions or scratches/chips on a used billiard ball, the lowest land on earth is about 413 meters or .2566 miles below sea level. This would equate to a depression only .07mil or .002 millimeters. An old cue ball I have here has a little ding in it probably .3 millimeters deep. That would equate to a canyon 40 miles below sea level on earth!

As for 'roundness' or sphericity, a billiard ball is probably more perfectly round than the earth. The rotation of the earth causes the earth to be 27 miles wider around the equator than a meridian thru the poles. This would resemble a squatty billiard ball about 1.1 millimeters narrower along one axis versus another, which I think would slightly but noticeably make the ball skitter or wow on the table.

So if I were to do a makeshift Mythbusters impression on here, my assessment of this claim is 'PLAUSIBLE'. :)

Bill

Check out my article on this topic: “Is a Pool Ball Smoother Than the Earth?” (BD, June, 2013).
 

DangleShot

New member
DangleShot, Howdy;

Lowest point on Earth is in the Marianas Trench known as The Challenger Deep;

hank
I was declaring anything under the surface of water invisible to the surface of the earth. Granted, it the oceans and lakes of the world evaporated, there would be greater depths and variance from highest to lowest. I chose to count liquid touching the earth as the earth. Not the most popular decision, maybe, but I think the diameter of the earth is measured at sea level...?

Bill
 

DangleShot

New member
Check out my article on this topic: “Is a Pool Ball Smoother Than the Earth?” (BD, June, 2013).
I should've known you would've addressed that already. :) There's probably nothing I would know about billiards that Dr. Dave doesn't. :) Even the physics behind the awesome swirly rotations a ball can make when it enters the corner pocket at a certain angle at a certain speed at the head end of a Brunswick Gold Crown gully return table. :)

Bill
 

TheBasics

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I was declaring anything under the surface of water invisible to the surface of the earth. Granted, it the oceans and lakes of the world evaporated, there would be greater depths and variance from highest to lowest. I chose to count liquid touching the earth as the earth. Not the most popular decision, maybe, but I think the diameter of the earth is measured at sea level...?

Bill
DamgleSHot, Howdy;

That could bring on a whole 'nuther conversation, Fresh water being different from Salt water,
the Med. being less salty then the Atlantic etc. chuckle, LOL.

hank
 

oknazevad

Registered
DamgleSHot, Howdy;

That could bring on a whole 'nuther conversation, Fresh water being different from Salt water,
the Med. being less salty then the Atlantic etc. chuckle, LOL.

hank
Got that backwards – the Mediterranean is saltier than the Atlantic Ocean by about 4 parts per thousand on average. That's largely because water flows into the Med, but the outflow to the Atlantic via the Straight of Gibraltar is limited by the latter's narrowness, so there some of the evaporation effect that creates salt lakes like in Utah, or the Dead Sea, or the Caspian.
 

rexus31

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Got that backwards – the Mediterranean is saltier than the Atlantic Ocean by about 4 parts per thousand on average. That's largely because water flows into the Med, but the outflow to the Atlantic via the Straight of Gibraltar is limited by the latter's narrowness, so there some of the evaporation effect that creates salt lakes like in Utah, or the Dead Sea, or the Caspian.
Screen Shot 2022-03-20 at 12.02.36 PM.png
 

TheBasics

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Got that backwards – the Mediterranean is saltier than the Atlantic Ocean by about 4 parts per thousand on average. That's largely because water flows into the Med, but the outflow to the Atlantic via the Straight of Gibraltar is limited by the latter's narrowness, so there some of the evaporation effect that creates salt lakes like in Utah, or the Dead Sea, or the Caspian.
Betchya got that straight from the Goo-goo net eh? chuckle.

hank
 
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