Rails nuts and torque wrench based on advise from main forums

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
Do you happen to know the proper torque for an Olhausen? My rails are playing fine, but I realize I just kind of guessed on torque. Didn't give them the "beef" or anything, just enough to put a slight tension on the hardware. I've tried looking online but no dice on the specs.
They use T-nuts embedded in the rails, don't go over 10lbs torque, and make sure your bolt don't run out of threads or you'll spin the nut in the rail, then you're screwed.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
"Just demand proof of quality before hiring."


There are no ways to demand proof before hiring. What proof? An opinion from another customer? OK. But that's an opinion, not proof.

You and I are close enough to each other to maybe share some work...maybe, I 'm not sure but... My 8' Olhausen was pretty much ruined with my last redo. I'm going to have to buy all new cushions for starters, plus redo the slate work, the pockets...omg the pockets! sigh

I''d just love to shoot a shot and not have the ob end up rolling across the floor.


Jeff Livingston
Pictures of past work, references more than a year old....is a good start.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
A
Not familiar with that torque wrench. What's the brand? It appears its a "Cam-Over" style mechanism. If you're only going to use this every few years for this job only I wouldn't worry about the following. "Cam-Over" style wrenches are notorious for losing their lubrication. When the cam moves, the grease also moves. It gets pushed around and out of the area where its needed.

Question for the Professional Table Mechanics: I realize those Dome Washers are large thus spread the tension out, but is there any relaxing of bolt tension over time? In other words, does the MDF move when the bolts are tightened. If it does then shouldn't the bolts be re-tightened after some period of time after they've settled in? This is the case on my table which is constructed of real wood and bolts with flat washers.
Absolutely, about every 90 days!
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
And here I tried, really tried, to have a conversation with you.

Good luck with the glue plan.



Jeff Livingston
What do you expect me to do, train the world of pool table mechanics to do their jobs better? I'm 64 years old, already spent 38 years of my life working on pool tables, I'm not working on pool tables and training the world of mechanics until the day I drop dead! I'm retiring next year, I'm done!!
 

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
What do you expect me to do, train the world of pool table mechanics to do their jobs better? I'm 64 years old, already spent 38 years of my life working on pool tables, I'm not working on pool tables and training the world of mechanics until the day I drop dead! I'm retiring next year, I'm done!!

I expected you to not jump on me for posting a fact of the matter, and your blaming customers for the shoddy work of the techs.

I ranted about the sorry state of table work and the industry apparently not caring.

Have a good retirement. Maybe write "the" book on maintenance?


Jeff Livingston
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
I expected you to not jump on me for posting a fact of the matter, and your blaming customers for the shoddy work of the techs.

I ranted about the sorry state of table work and the industry apparently not caring.

Have a good retirement. Maybe write "the" book on maintenance?


Jeff Livingston
If all potential customers before they hired a pool table mechanic, insisted on proof of quality of work by way of pictures of work performed, not pictures of tables completed, and had reviews of customers more than a year old, with phone numbers supplied, the process of weeding out the hacks would gain more traction to either improve their skills, or get out of this line of work. Until that happens, hacks are going to stay employed because most all potential customers don't view working on pool tables as a highly skilled trade, after all, how difficult can it be....right?
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
Even pool table retail stores have their share of hacks going out setting up NEW pool tables, so the lack of skills isn't limited to the independent table mechanics working for themselves.
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I thought the responses were pretty matter of fact.
In fact, i had to keep checking that it was RKC & not some nice guy who usurped his avatar or something.

The problem is that the pool industry is small in terms of KNOWLEDGEABLE customers. Probably even tiny.
The guy who gets accredited by a reputable agency (theory, none exist in this field) & holds his line in terms of what the work is worth, is not going to get enough work in most local travel areas to feed his family. Even the hacks probably have other jobs. That drives everything.

There could be a national accrediting agency regardless, but to whose benefit would it stand and maintain? (besides a few educated customers)
If pool continues to grow, maybe, but that is not individual techs' focus. They are too busy working on tables. The good ones have enough work. So do the hacks.

Wow - looks like i'm a slow typer, there at least 2 more messages since starting...

smt
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Being in trades myself (mostly construction, but also professional machinist) I see it all the time.
I tend to only work for people who understand and want results, not price.

Regarding pool tables, a professional can see what needs done to make a table play well (assuming good bones to start)
But 99.5% of customers aren't going to want to hear it and would resent "all the add-ons he is trying to screw me with"
Or hearing that the family table is a piece of crap.

They want to hear a fixed price including cloth, probably under $250 :)
So there's no value to anyone to do it right for most people on most tables.
Throw it together, meet the quoted price, preferably don't keep their house tied up for too long, get back on the road, and everyone is happy.
Except the 0.5% congenital malcontents that post on AZ
:)

smt
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
What do you expect me to do, train the world of pool table mechanics to do their jobs better? I'm 64 years old, already spent 38 years of my life working on pool tables, I'm not working on pool tables and training the world of mechanics until the day I drop dead! I'm retiring next year, I'm done!!
Well, if you get bored in retirement, I know I'd pay at least $100 for a mechanics book. Might be a fun project but there's a lot of fun stuff to do that doesn't involve pool tables! :)
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Throw it together, meet the quoted price, preferably don't keep their house tied up for too long, get back on the road, and everyone is happy.
Except the 0.5% congenital malcontents that post on AZ
This is exactly why I try to learn to do my own mechanic work. I'm not loaded but I'm pretty handy with mechanical and nit picky things. If I shopped for a mechanic within my budget I would not be satisfied with the local results. Better to buy some new toys tools and learn how to do it correctly myself. I cringe every time I see those damn side pockets with cloth folded over the point of the cushion and 2" up the rail on each side that the local "good" mechanic does. I've never, no matter how shitty of a place I'm in, seen it done that way, but whoever this dude is... he comes highly recommended and every dummy here thinks it's the correct way. I'm picky as hell, but I can't afford to be picky so I learn to do it myself.

If I saw a washer upside down, a staple hammered over or anything similar I wouldn't pick or recommend that mechanic again. The devil is in the details as they say, if a mechanic misses something that easy it makes me wonder about his experience level. You gotta take pride in your work, it's your calling card.

I'm bad enough at pool on my own not to find mechanic related excuses to use! 😁

Like fishing?😅
Hell yeah!
 

Ssonerai

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well, if you get bored in retirement, I know I'd pay at least $100 for a mechanics book. Might be a fun project but there's a lot of fun stuff to do that doesn't involve pool tables! :)

I'm a curious person, at least that is what my wife and some of her friends have said.

So if it looked like/had the production values, rigor, succintness, and presentation of _Foundations of Mechanical Accuracy_, (one of the most beautiful books on the extensive shelves here)...
Heck yes!
 

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
This is exactly why I try to learn to do my own mechanic work. I'm not loaded but I'm pretty handy with mechanical and nit picky things. If I shopped for a mechanic within my budget I would not be satisfied with the local results. Better to buy some new toys tools and learn how to do it correctly myself. I cringe every time I see those damn side pockets with cloth folded over the point of the cushion and 2" up the rail on each side that the local "good" mechanic does. I've never, no matter how shitty of a place I'm in, seen it done that way, but whoever this dude is... he comes highly recommended and every dummy here thinks it's the correct way. I'm picky as hell, but I can't afford to be picky so I learn to do it myself.

If I saw a washer upside down, a staple hammered over or anything similar I wouldn't pick or recommend that mechanic again. The devil is in the details as they say, if a mechanic misses something that easy it makes me wonder about his experience level. You gotta take pride in your work, it's your calling card.

I'm bad enough at pool on my own not to find mechanic related excuses to use! 😁


Hell yeah!

I wanted my side pockets done that way. It keeps the fold out of play.

'course they did it the "normal" way instead. sigh


Jeff Livingston
 

smoochie

NotLikeThis
Just an update! The table now plays day and night different!!! The cushions apparently were A) Loose to standard, B) Missing two nuts completely!! both of these participated into feeling the rails playing sluggish, I've been playing for all my life so I can notice when rails aren't responding normally!! But thankfully we have this forums to help us non-mechanics. Now my table is playing wonderfully!! At least better than it did before. Still the table is old and nowhere as near as a new table/rails etc... but now at least it's playable and good!!

I'd like to thank everyone who helped me here with everything from buying the exact type of tools to how to tightening the rails to the exact standard settings! I'm grateful.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
This is exactly why I try to learn to do my own mechanic work. I'm not loaded but I'm pretty handy with mechanical and nit picky things. If I shopped for a mechanic within my budget I would not be satisfied with the local results. Better to buy some new toys tools and learn how to do it correctly myself. I cringe every time I see those damn side pockets with cloth folded over the point of the cushion and 2" up the rail on each side that the local "good" mechanic does. I've never, no matter how shitty of a place I'm in, seen it done that way, but whoever this dude is... he comes highly recommended and every dummy here thinks it's the correct way. I'm picky as hell, but I can't afford to be picky so I learn to do it myself.

If I saw a washer upside down, a staple hammered over or anything similar I wouldn't pick or recommend that mechanic again. The devil is in the details as they say, if a mechanic misses something that easy it makes me wonder about his experience level. You gotta take pride in your work, it's your calling card.

I'm bad enough at pool on my own not to find mechanic related excuses to use! 😁


Hell yeah!
Just an update! The table now plays day and night different!!! The cushions apparently were A) Loose to standard, B) Missing two nuts completely!! both of these participated into feeling the rails playing sluggish, I've been playing for all my life so I can notice when rails aren't responding normally!! But thankfully we have this forums to help us non-mechanics. Now my table is playing wonderfully!! At least better than it did before. Still the table is old and nowhere as near as a new table/rails etc... but now at least it's playable and good!!

I'd like to thank everyone who helped me here with everything from buying the exact type of tools to how to tightening the rails to the exact standard settings! I'm grateful.
👍
 
Top