Rails nuts and torque wrench based on advise from main forums

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
Tried that route already, the ABIA. All the mechanics wanted to do was join so they could get referrals for jobs.

And...was joining just a pay thing or were there real courses and tests and such to pass?

I used to fix copiers. I couldn't touch a brand until I had formal certified training, and then on certain models only. There was no 'winging it' in that industry. What prevents pool table maintenance from copying that model? You once told me it was because the table manufactuers don't care about their product after sales, but why not care? Wouldn't such a market advantage pay off long-term and put the hacks out of business?


Jeff Livingston
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
And...was joining just a pay thing or were there real courses and tests and such to pass?

I used to fix copiers. I couldn't touch a brand until I had formal certified training, and then on certain models only. There was no 'winging it' in that industry. What prevents pool table maintenance from copying that model? You once told me it was because the table manufactuers don't care about their product after sales, but why not care? Wouldn't such a market advantage pay off long-term and put the hacks out of business?


Jeff Livingston
No skill test required!!
 

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
No skill test required!!

It should be not just skill at mechanics, but specific requirements for any particular brand and model. Like torque, for example, a most vital spec.

In fact, mechanical skill would be lower on my list of things I want from a table Person than specific knowledge about MY table would be.

OH well, rant over.

Thanks,


Jeff Livingston
 

smoochie

NotLikeThis
I've written a whole respond of what happened after I used torque wrench in the main forums. I did tightening the bolts accordingly as per instructed here (19 Nm) for each bolt.

Just to sum it up. The result is AMAZING. rails are responding better than they were before, the guy who did it barely screwed his nuts, I attest to this when I open them lose, I could open them with one finger.

Anyway also to say it in short, two rails were missing a dome washer & a bolt all together, I couldn't find the nut or the dome washer in those two rails which also explains why these two rails specifically were feeling more dead than the other rails, the nuts missing in the middle of the rail as can be seen in the picture.

UH9yE7JfmY.png


As things stands, the other rails plays wonderful, at least better than what they did before I did the job with the torque wrench. Now my mission is to find Two dome washers & two 15mm nuts (half inch nuts), I'm wondering if I can find them in local hardware shots or are these specifically made for gold crown and I must order them online.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
I've written a whole respond of what happened after I used torque wrench in the main forums. I did tightening the bolts accordingly as per instructed here (19 Nm) for each bolt.

Just to sum it up. The result is AMAZING. rails are responding better than they were before, the guy who did it barely screwed his nuts, I attest to this when I open them lose, I could open them with one finger.

Anyway also to say it in short, two rails were missing a dome washer & a bolt all together, I couldn't find the nut or the dome washer in those two rails which also explains why these two rails specifically were feeling more dead than the other rails, the nuts missing in the middle of the rail as can be seen in the picture.

View attachment 603423

As things stands, the other rails plays wonderful, at least better than what they did before I did the job with the torque wrench. Now my mission is to find Two dome washers & two 15mm nuts (half inch nuts), I'm wondering if I can find them in local hardware shots or are these specifically made for gold crown and I must order them online.
Take a nut off to use as an example to look for.
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
It should be not just skill at mechanics, but specific requirements for any particular brand and model. Like torque, for example, a most vital spec.

In fact, mechanical skill would be lower on my list of things I want from a table Person than specific knowledge about MY table would be.

OH well, rant over.

Thanks,


Jeff Livingston
Basic mechanics is needed to work on any table, but if you don't understand, then guess what.
 

Sheldon

dontneednostinkintitle
Silver Member
As things stands, the other rails plays wonderful, at least better than what they did before I did the job with the torque wrench. Now my mission is to find Two dome washers & two 15mm nuts (half inch nuts), I'm wondering if I can find them in local hardware shots or are these specifically made for gold crown and I must order them online.
I don't know where you are located, and I'm guessing you're not in the US. But here is a link to some washers. They were the best I could find when I was looking for some. https://www.muellers.com/Crown-Lock-Washer,1945.html If nothing else, it will be a start on what to look for.
 

smoochie

NotLikeThis
I don't know where you are located, and I'm guessing you're not in the US. But here is a link to some washers. They were the best I could find when I was looking for some. https://www.muellers.com/Crown-Lock-Washer,1945.html If nothing else, it will be a start on what to look for.
You’re correct I’m in the Middle East. Now I’ll go to a hardware bolts shop and try to find similar? Will similar washers work here or do I need the exact same?

I do see the dimension in the site you’ve provided which will help me in my hunt tomorrow.
 

Sheldon

dontneednostinkintitle
Silver Member
You’re correct I’m in the Middle East. Now I’ll go to a hardware bolts shop and try to find similar? Will similar washers work here or do I need the exact same?

I do see the dimension in the site you’ve provided which will help me in my hunt tomorrow.
Similar will work. Ideally, they should be domed, so that tension is maintained. Do like Glen said, and take a nut and a washer with you when you go looking.
 

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
Basic mechanics is needed to work on any table, but if you don't understand, then guess what.

wtf?

I understand as I worked professionally as a mechanic for years and privately on everything a guy could fix.

This is why I'm going to fix my own table next time. You so-called "table mechanics" can eat chalk.

Nevermind.


Jeff Livingston
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
wtf?

I understand as I worked professionally as a mechanic for years and privately on everything a guy could fix.

This is why I'm going to fix my own table next time. You so-called "table mechanics" can eat chalk.

Nevermind.


Jeff Livingston
The problem in this industry, is the customers! They don't know the difference between good or bad work, all they know is the price they're willing to pay to have their table worked on, and shop around for the best prices. They have this mind set that anyone who works on pool tables does the same level of work, after all, its just a pool table, how difficult can it be? Most home owners don't play pool in the first place, they just bought a table to put in a room that will fit a pool table in it, or not! Quality pool tables can be just a bad as bad table mechanics, meaning ALL pool tables are not built the same, so there's that price shopping again, cheaper is better, it's just a POOL TABLE!

BUT, then you have the pool table owner that DOES know something about how a pool table is suppose to play, and look when the work is done, who really DOES care about the quality of the job done, who then finds out the industry standard is subpar to their expectations, and is willing to PAY more for quality work, but has a small pond to chose from, and paying MORE $$$ won't make any difference, when that small pond of mechanics don't posse the skills required to do stand out work!!!!
 

realkingcobra

Well-known member
Silver Member
As long as the customers support hacks in this industry by NOT asking for proof of skills, nothing is going to change, and the hacks will continue to do the work they do.....and get PAID!!!
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Thats perfect 👌
Do you happen to know the proper torque for an Olhausen? My rails are playing fine, but I realize I just kind of guessed on torque. Didn't give them the "beef" or anything, just enough to put a slight tension on the hardware. I've tried looking online but no dice on the specs.
 

chefjeff

Nazis are back.
Silver Member
Do you happen to know the proper torque for an Olhausen? My rails are playing fine, but I realize I just kind of guessed on torque. Didn't give them the "beef" or anything, just enough to put a slight tension on the hardware. I've tried looking online but no dice on the specs.

"Just demand proof of quality before hiring."


There are no ways to demand proof before hiring. What proof? An opinion from another customer? OK. But that's an opinion, not proof.

You and I are close enough to each other to maybe share some work...maybe, I 'm not sure but... My 8' Olhausen was pretty much ruined with my last redo. I'm going to have to buy all new cushions for starters, plus redo the slate work, the pockets...omg the pockets! sigh

I''d just love to shoot a shot and not have the ob end up rolling across the floor.


Jeff Livingston
 

Sheldon

dontneednostinkintitle
Silver Member
Do you happen to know the proper torque for an Olhausen? My rails are playing fine, but I realize I just kind of guessed on torque. Didn't give them the "beef" or anything, just enough to put a slight tension on the hardware. I've tried looking online but no dice on the specs.
12-15 ft-lbs is typical for 3/8" rail bolts.
Edit:
They use T-nuts embedded in the rails, don't go over 10lbs torque, and make sure your bolt don't run out of threads or you'll spin the nut in the rail, then you're screwed.
 
Last edited:

3kushn

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not familiar with that torque wrench. What's the brand? It appears its a "Cam-Over" style mechanism. If you're only going to use this every few years for this job only I wouldn't worry about the following. "Cam-Over" style wrenches are notorious for losing their lubrication. When the cam moves, the grease also moves. It gets pushed around and out of the area where its needed.

Question for the Professional Table Mechanics: I realize those Dome Washers are large thus spread the tension out, but is there any relaxing of bolt tension over time? In other words, does the MDF move when the bolts are tightened. If it does then shouldn't the bolts be re-tightened after some period of time after they've settled in? This is the case on my table which is constructed of real wood and bolts with flat washers.
 
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