Ranking Players D to A

BWColeman

BWC
Silver Member
I have been on AZB for a while(2010) and I always see people talking about A players B players C players and so on

What do you consider the skill level of these different Rankings

Would a B player be considered a shortstop ( a good local player who routinely wins Local Tournaments )

And would an A Player be someone who routinely wins regional Tournaments

Just wondering what are people opinions and what would be a good way to test yourself if you are gauging your own speed

On a race to 10 against the ghost (9-ball)

Would an A player beat the ghost

B player lose to the Ghost say 10-8

C Player lose to the ghost 10-5 or lower

D player ( Banger ) no chance against the ghost
 

zpele

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have been on AZB for a while(2010) and I always see people talking about A players B players C players and so on

What do you consider the skill level of these different Rankings

Would a B player be considered a shortstop ( a good local player who routinely wins Local Tournaments )

And would an A Player be someone who routinely wins regional Tournaments

Just wondering what are people opinions and what would be a good way to test yourself if you are gauging your own speed

On a race to 10 against the ghost (9-ball)

Would an A player beat the ghost

B player lose to the Ghost say 10-8

C Player lose to the ghost 10-5 or lower

D player ( Banger ) no chance against the ghost

Personally I really believe this has to do with the area a person plays. Saying someone is an A player because they win regional tournaments in a region with mostly apa 5s doesn't mean much. Saying someone is an A player in a region packed with pros is something else entirely. In general a true A player can wipe the floor with most APA SL 7s.

I usually think of a B player as close to an APA SL 7 but C players are often near the level of APA 6s or low 7s. There are many different skill levels for SL 7s.

Then you have your barbox specialists whose game doesn't really translate over to 9footers. They may run packs consistently on a barbox and hold up skill wise to pros but struggle to run a single table on a 9foot.
 

RiverCity

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have been on AZB for a while(2010) and I always see people talking about A players B players C players and so on

What do you consider the skill level of these different Rankings

Would a B player be considered a shortstop ( a good local player who routinely wins Local Tournaments )

And would an A Player be someone who routinely wins regional Tournaments

Just wondering what are people opinions and what would be a good way to test yourself if you are gauging your own speed

On a race to 10 against the ghost (9-ball)

Would an A player beat the ghost

B player lose to the Ghost say 10-8

C Player lose to the ghost 10-5 or lower

D player ( Banger ) no chance against the ghost
Hard to use the ghost to rate anyone as it only gives a picture of offensive firepower and using local tournaments etc is problematic because it depends on the strength of the field.
This is a small look at how I clock people, and there is of course sub levels in each category based on other attributes

D players are bangers, they dont stand right, dont shoot right. Making a ball is usually more luck than skill.

C players are figuring out how to stand and the importance of a good stroke. Theyre trying to play and can make a couple of balls here and there. If the balls are laying good they might get lucky and run out once in a blue moon

B players are a little more serious students of the game. Their fundamentals are usually consistent and their pocketing is better. Position play varies from rudimentary to knowing some of the safer routes to use. If the balls lay good they are a threat to run out 50% of those racks. A tough out takes some luck to get out of.

A players are gaining consistency. Their pocketing is good, their position play is good. They are expected to get out of an easy run most of the time, and the hard outs are getting consistently better but they lack the consistency of better players.

Short stops are player capable of pro speed play, but cant hit their gear at will. The short stop is usually the best A player in the area and is the shortstop based on consistency.

Pro level players have the knowledge and the skill set to get out most racks that are runnable, and are smart enough to know when not to push it. They have learned how to hit their top gear pretty much at will and are usually separated by consistency of hitting that gear. The top guys are "on" almost all the time, and when they are off the difference is usually only one or two shots a match.
Hope this helps
Chuck
 
Last edited:

BWColeman

BWC
Silver Member
thanks Chuck

Hard to use the ghost to rate anyone as it only gives a picture of offensive firepower and using local tournaments etc is problematic because it depends on the strength of the field.
This is a small look at how I clock people, and there is of course sub levels in each category based on other attributes

D players are bangers, they dont stand right, dont shoot right. Making a ball is usually more luck than skill.

C players are figuring out how to stand and the importance of a good stroke. Theyre trying to play and can make a couple of balls here and there. If the balls are laying good they might get lucky and run out once in a blue moon

B players are a little more serious students of the game. Their fundamentals are usually consistent and their pocketing is better. Position play varies from rudimentary to knowing some of the safer routes to use. If the balls lay good they are a threat to run out 50% of those racks. A tough out takes some luck to get out of.

A players are gaining consistency. Their pocketing is good, their position play is good. They are expected to get out of an easy run most of the time, and the hard outs are getting consistently better but they lack the consistency of better players.

Short stops are player capable of pro speed play, but cant hit their gear at will. The short stop is usually the best A player in the area and is the shortstop based on consistency.

Pro level players have the knowledge and the skill set to get out most racks that are runnable, and are smart enough to know when not to push it. They have learned how to hit their top gear pretty much at will and are usually separated by consistency of hitting that gear. The top guys are "on" almost all the time, and when they are off the difference is usually only one or two shots a match.
Hope this helps
Chuck

Chuck that is one of the best descriptions I have heard and you and I are very close in our thinking ,

I have never really considered where my game is but by your description I guess I would land in the B category
 

naji

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have been on AZB for a while(2010) and I always see people talking about A players B players C players and so on

What do you consider the skill level of these different Rankings

Would a B player be considered a shortstop ( a good local player who routinely wins Local Tournaments )

And would an A Player be someone who routinely wins regional Tournaments

Just wondering what are people opinions and what would be a good way to test yourself if you are gauging your own speed

On a race to 10 against the ghost (9-ball)

Would an A player beat the ghost

B player lose to the Ghost say 10-8

C Player lose to the ghost 10-5 or lower

D player ( Banger ) no chance against the ghost

Each game has a players' rating, a one pocket A player might be a C player in 9 ball?

But i like the use of 9 ball to classify players, but the rating has to be a result of repeated tournament matches or money games wins. Practice, video taping, ok for self evaluation, but not real measure, since the element of pressure to perform is missing which is a major test for player's ability to remember check lists required to execute a shot (good stroke), and thought process for picking best pattern play.
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have been on AZB for a while(2010) and I always see people talking about A players B players C players and so on

What do you consider the skill level of these different Rankings

Would a B player be considered a shortstop ( a good local player who routinely wins Local Tournaments )

And would an A Player be someone who routinely wins regional Tournaments

Just wondering what are people opinions and what would be a good way to test yourself if you are gauging your own speed

On a race to 10 against the ghost (9-ball)

Would an A player beat the ghost

B player lose to the Ghost say 10-8

C Player lose to the ghost 10-5 or lower

D player ( Banger ) no chance against the ghost

If you've been on here a while you would have seen the other 10 threads like this :grin:

Your D player is right, your C and B players are too high, I don't know any C player, or C+ that can run even 1 of 10 racks of 10 ball consistently even with ball in hand never mind 5 of 10. They would average 3-4 balls after ball in hand.

B player would end up 2-3 racks maybe of 10 run with ball in hand consistently.

Of course this is all based on what people call those rankings. I go by D is basically a beginner, C is just about leaning about position, B can play position but not super and usually end up with a 5-6 ball run after ball in hand, A can run out a rack with ball in hand more often than not if things are open.

I've seen people call players Bs that I would consider at least low As.

To win regional tours you can do so as an A but most often you would be an A+ or the one over A+, an Open player (what some may call AA or AAA)
 

hang-the-9

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Personally I really believe this has to do with the area a person plays. Saying someone is an A player because they win regional tournaments in a region with mostly apa 5s doesn't mean much. Saying someone is an A player in a region packed with pros is something else entirely. In general a true A player can wipe the floor with most APA SL 7s.

I usually think of a B player as close to an APA SL 7 but C players are often near the level of APA 6s or low 7s. There are many different skill levels for SL 7s.

Then you have your barbox specialists whose game doesn't really translate over to 9footers. They may run packs consistently on a barbox and hold up skill wise to pros but struggle to run a single table on a 9foot.

I don't think those ratings count where you are at all, they just count how well you can run out a table or what knowledge you posses. If you can run a certain amount of balls that is your rank, not if you can beat Joe or Bill but always lose to Charlie. APA and other handicaps are different, those would rank you vs other players. Which is why you can get an APA 5 that is a C and one that is a B (if you don't count sandbagging). But a B in one state is a B in another state since that ranking is purely on your ability vs an open table. If you can run 5-6-7 balls pretty consistently, you are a B, does not matter if you do it in your home table, at the local pool hall or in France.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
FYI, lots of info and resources related to this topic can be found here:

A-D player-rating-system resource page

Enjoy,
Dave

dave
from your site i think this is a pretty good assessment of level
,,,,,
from Tom_In_Cincy:

9-Ball Tournament race to 7
(paraphrased from Dec.1997 "All About Pool" magazine article by Bob Cambell)

Handicap rankings

D- Player
will not run a rack
average run is about 3 balls
with ball in hand, will get out from the 7, one out of 3 times
rarely plays a successful safe

C-Player
will probably run one rack, but usually not more than one rack in a typical race to 7
avg. run is 3 to 5 balls
with ball in hand, will get out from the 7, two out of 3 times
mixed results when playing safe
inning ends due to botched position, missed shot or attempting a safe.

B-Player
Able to run 1 to 3 racks
avg. run is 5-7 balls
with ball in hand will get out form the 5, 2 out of 3 times
most of the time a "B" player will play a "safety" which maybe hit easily 2 out of 3 times
a typical inning will end with a missed shot, a fair safety, or a won game

A-Player
will string 2 to 3 racks
avg. ball run, 7-9
with ball in hand, will be out from the 3 ball, 2 out of 3 times
typical inning will end with a well executed safety or a win.

OPEN-Players
average 8+ balls
string racks together more than once in a match
is a threat to run out from every ball, from every position, every inning
typical inning will end in excellent safety or win

Mr. Cambell continues this article with a handicap chart for the 4 levels of each type of player. The chart would look like this;

Lowest handicap is D4, then D3, then D2 and so on until the highest would be OPEN 1
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my heros.
Silver Member
The Arizona Rating System use to rate players Four to Ten Minus Two.

So basically you have 9 step rating chart.

Four not knowing what end to chalk.

Ten Minus Two, as a Pro Player.

Very confusing like most rating or handicapping system, as there was no taking into account Game (ie 8, 9, or 10 Ball, 14/1, 0r One Pocket).

Bar Table, or Full sized table.

People play different strengths on different table sizes, and games. FACT!

Like most handicapping systems it did not work IMHO. People always found a way to beat or trick the person who gave the initial RATINGS. So some New Bad Player who could hid speed robbed for a while, than left town LOL

But the one thing is if you get to be an “8” or higher in Arizona, the number of Tournaments you can play in diminishes the better you got.

If you are a 7 or under you can find a tournament to play, or many tournament most 9, or 8 ball to play in 7 nights a week.

The Bar Owners figured out long ago, the 4, 5, 6’s, and 7’s drink more, spend money, and are not as serious. So they cater their tournament to those who pay the bills.

Better players are more serious, and just don't drink like the bangers.

JMHO.
 

Nine ... corner

A student of human moves~
Silver Member
Saw this posted by, I think, Mr. Cleary ... not positive. A B player can beat the ghost in 6 ball in a race to 7 consistently. If you can beat the ghost in a race to 7 in 9 ball, then you're an A. Go ahead and jump me ... I'm a B! ;)
 

mantis99

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
dave
from your site i think this is a pretty good assessment of level
,,,,,
from Tom_In_Cincy:

9-Ball Tournament race to 7
(paraphrased from Dec.1997 "All About Pool" magazine article by Bob Cambell)

Handicap rankings

D- Player
will not run a rack
average run is about 3 balls
with ball in hand, will get out from the 7, one out of 3 times
rarely plays a successful safe

C-Player
will probably run one rack, but usually not more than one rack in a typical race to 7
avg. run is 3 to 5 balls
with ball in hand, will get out from the 7, two out of 3 times
mixed results when playing safe
inning ends due to botched position, missed shot or attempting a safe.

B-Player
Able to run 1 to 3 racks
avg. run is 5-7 balls
with ball in hand will get out form the 5, 2 out of 3 times
most of the time a "B" player will play a "safety" which maybe hit easily 2 out of 3 times
a typical inning will end with a missed shot, a fair safety, or a won game

A-Player
will string 2 to 3 racks
avg. ball run, 7-9
with ball in hand, will be out from the 3 ball, 2 out of 3 times
typical inning will end with a well executed safety or a win.

OPEN-Players
average 8+ balls
string racks together more than once in a match
is a threat to run out from every ball, from every position, every inning
typical inning will end in excellent safety or win

Mr. Cambell continues this article with a handicap chart for the 4 levels of each type of player. The chart would look like this;

Lowest handicap is D4, then D3, then D2 and so on until the highest would be OPEN 1


I agree with the D and C level player, but I think the B level has too low of a quality. The description of a B level player would have me as one, and I think I am no more than a strong C player. I think both the A and B level would be a step above howe they are described.
 

TWOFORPOOL

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ranking Players

Hard to use the ghost to rate anyone as it only gives a picture of offensive firepower and using local tournaments etc is problematic because it depends on the strength of the field.
This is a small look at how I clock people, and there is of course sub levels in each category based on other attributes

D players are bangers, they dont stand right, dont shoot right. Making a ball is usually more luck than skill.

C players are figuring out how to stand and the importance of a good stroke. Theyre trying to play and can make a couple of balls here and there. If the balls are laying good they might get lucky and run out once in a blue moon

B players are a little more serious students of the game. Their fundamentals are usually consistent and their pocketing is better. Position play varies from rudimentary to knowing some of the safer routes to use. If the balls lay good they are a threat to run out 50% of those racks. A tough out takes some luck to get out of.

A players are gaining consistency. Their pocketing is good, their position play is good. They are expected to get out of an easy run most of the time, and the hard outs are getting consistently better but they lack the consistency of better players.

Short stops are player capable of pro speed play, but cant hit their gear at will. The short stop is usually the best A player in the area and is the shortstop based on consistency.

Pro level players have the knowledge and the skill set to get out most racks that are runnable, and are smart enough to know when not to push it. They have learned how to hit their top gear pretty much at will and are usually separated by consistency of hitting that gear. The top guys are "on" almost all the time, and when they are off the difference is usually only one or two shots a match.
Hope this helps
Chuck

Very well stated!
 

PoloBob

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hard to use the ghost to rate anyone as it only gives a picture of offensive firepower and using local tournaments etc is problematic because it depends on the strength of the field.
This is a small look at how I clock people, and there is of course sub levels in each category based on other attributes

D players are bangers, they dont stand right, dont shoot right. Making a ball is usually more luck than skill.

C players are figuring out how to stand and the importance of a good stroke. Theyre trying to play and can make a couple of balls here and there. If the balls are laying good they might get lucky and run out once in a blue moon

B players are a little more serious students of the game. Their fundamentals are usually consistent and their pocketing is better. Position play varies from rudimentary to knowing some of the safer routes to use. If the balls lay good they are a threat to run out 50% of those racks. A tough out takes some luck to get out of.

A players are gaining consistency. Their pocketing is good, their position play is good. They are expected to get out of an easy run most of the time, and the hard outs are getting consistently better but they lack the consistency of better players.

Short stops are player capable of pro speed play, but cant hit their gear at will. The short stop is usually the best A player in the area and is the shortstop based on consistency.

Pro level players have the knowledge and the skill set to get out most racks that are runnable, and are smart enough to know when not to push it. They have learned how to hit their top gear pretty much at will and are usually separated by consistency of hitting that gear. The top guys are "on" almost all the time, and when they are off the difference is usually only one or two shots a match.
Hope this helps
Chuck

Great description, Chuck! Thanks
 

Charlie Hustle

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hard to use the ghost to rate anyone as it only gives a picture of offensive firepower and using local tournaments etc is problematic because it depends on the strength of the field.
This is a small look at how I clock people, and there is of course sub levels in each category based on other attributes

D players are bangers, they dont stand right, dont shoot right. Making a ball is usually more luck than skill.

C players are figuring out how to stand and the importance of a good stroke. Theyre trying to play and can make a couple of balls here and there. If the balls are laying good they might get lucky and run out once in a blue moon

B players are a little more serious students of the game. Their fundamentals are usually consistent and their pocketing is better. Position play varies from rudimentary to knowing some of the safer routes to use. If the balls lay good they are a threat to run out 50% of those racks. A tough out takes some luck to get out of.

A players are gaining consistency. Their pocketing is good, their position play is good. They are expected to get out of an easy run most of the time, and the hard outs are getting consistently better but they lack the consistency of better players.

Short stops are player capable of pro speed play, but cant hit their gear at will. The short stop is usually the best A player in the area and is the shortstop based on consistency.

Pro level players have the knowledge and the skill set to get out most racks that are runnable, and are smart enough to know when not to push it. They have learned how to hit their top gear pretty much at will and are usually separated by consistency of hitting that gear. The top guys are "on" almost all the time, and when they are off the difference is usually only one or two shots a match.
Hope this helps
Chuck

This is exactly how I would rate D-Pro. Especially here in the Houston area.
 

naji

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hard to use the ghost to rate anyone as it only gives a picture of offensive firepower and using local tournaments etc is problematic because it depends on the strength of the field.
This is a small look at how I clock people, and there is of course sub levels in each category based on other attributes

D players are bangers, they dont stand right, dont shoot right. Making a ball is usually more luck than skill.

C players are figuring out how to stand and the importance of a good stroke. Theyre trying to play and can make a couple of balls here and there. If the balls are laying good they might get lucky and run out once in a blue moon

B players are a little more serious students of the game. Their fundamentals are usually consistent and their pocketing is better. Position play varies from rudimentary to knowing some of the safer routes to use. If the balls lay good they are a threat to run out 50% of those racks. A tough out takes some luck to get out of.

A players are gaining consistency. Their pocketing is good, their position play is good. They are expected to get out of an easy run most of the time, and the hard outs are getting consistently better but they lack the consistency of better players.

Short stops are player capable of pro speed play, but cant hit their gear at will. The short stop is usually the best A player in the area and is the shortstop based on consistency.

Pro level players have the knowledge and the skill set to get out most racks that are runnable, and are smart enough to know when not to push it. They have learned how to hit their top gear pretty much at will and are usually separated by consistency of hitting that gear. The top guys are "on" almost all the time, and when they are off the difference is usually only one or two shots a match.
Hope this helps
Chuck

Good one Chuck. I add, pros excel where experience counts: Kicks, banks, safety, shoot of the rail /jacked up, jumps. It takes years and million balls hit!
 
Many of you overestimate
C means can't run racks
A player's here might run a rack every 6th time
Talent and results move fast from there. AA1 can beat the ghost more often than not. AA it's close but in stroke they can beat ghost.
 

Jaden

"no buds chill"
Silver Member
If you're running a rack only every sixth time...

Many of you overestimate
C means can't run racks
A player's here might run a rack every 6th time
Talent and results move fast from there. AA1 can beat the ghost more often than not. AA it's close but in stroke they can beat ghost.

If you're running a rack only every sixth time you have an open rack, you aren't an A player...

An A player should be atleast 50/50 with the ghost.

Jaden
 
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