Shaft Wax ( Discussing methods of shaft maintenace )

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Oh... and one other thing I wanted to mention about waxed shafts, particularly to those who have issues with sweating hands: In my experience, wax on a shaft is like wearing polyester instead of cotton on a hot summer day. Your body heat escapes through cotton. Polyester traps the heat and you will sweat more. Think about a shaft sealed with wax vs. no wax.

I know what my experience was.
 

headmuses

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
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SilverCue

Sir Raksalot
Silver Member
I tried the Mothers California Gold and it's not near a slick as Dupont Teflon Spray Wax.
BTW, Dupont Teflon Spray Wax has Carnauba.
 

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mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
results so far

Well it seems that if I was blind folded I don't know if I could tell what wax works the best as in the slickest, hardest.
The smell of the different waxes is a give away at first.

There are so many products out there that use waxes, it is incredible.
Waxes are on paper bags MM candies cars boats surf boards floors candles petroleum products money wrapping paper book matches and pool cues.

So I broke out some junk shafts that that are no longer any good and started to go crazy on putting different stuff on them to compare one technic from the other.

I want everyone to kind of think out of the box or be opened minded on what I am going to say.

Allot of paper products are coated with wax and in a pinch a paper bag will help.
Now here is where you need to use your imagination.
Allot of petroleum contain waxes, example diesel fuel has x amount of Paraffin wax in it. # 2 diesel has more then the No 1 diesel fuel.
NO I DONT WANT YOU TO USE DIESEL FUEL ON YOUR SHAFT.
But if you dig deep you will find some very surprising petroleum products that will help make your shaft slick.
So ask your self what is a very clean burning liquid fuel that contains Paraffin wax.

One other hint is all car waxes made with natural waxes ( paraffin Carnauba bees ) wax has or uses petroleum in them.......................

So my do it yourself tests or research I poured fuel all over a POS junk shafts and spun it on my lathe , thinking 2 things, 1 is I don't want to be around anyone that smokes and what about the scent.

I burned the fuel in by friction, and the shaft came out so so, I didn't feel it was a slick as the renaissance or the pure polymer but I really didn't think the test was a total waist.
I was very surprised I couldn't smell the fuel.
I waxed over the top of the fuel and got a very slick surface and I was happy with the feel and the fact I couldn't smell the petroleum fuel
But here is the kicker, the solid maple shaft really soaked the fuel up.
And I will be doing tests to see if I can control shaft weight by using certain liquid fuels.

My top picks so far is renaissance wax and pure polymer synthetic wax, but I am tempted to use liquid fuel as a base coat.

I also need to do tests and find out how fast the fuel evaporates.

PS I have only used the fuel on a junk shaft, and just now tested it> I have no idea if the fuel will hurt the hit of the shaft or hurt the strength of the wood.
 

RiverCity

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Mizerak suggested lighter fluid in one of his early books. I tried it one time with a paper towel very lightly dampened with zippo fluid. All it did was raise the grain big time. Ended up having to sand the loose fibers off and smooth/burnish the shaft back to normal.
Ive tried various waxes over the years, but always go back to a raw wood shaft. To me it just feels better, and stays that way longer. If it feels too 'sticky', the old slightly damp brown paper towel to wipe and burnish it is usually all that I need. If it gets too shiny, I knock it back down with a few light passes of 2000 grit or a q-wiz.

Just out of curiosity for the people who do prefer wax, what is it that makes you like it?
 

edep12

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Until I read this thread here was my tried and true routine...

1) Longoni Cue wax applied with clean wash cloth

2) Wait 3-5 minutes for it to dry, then take it off with second clean wash cloth

3) Burnish it in really good with this form fitted, half shaft shaped, piece of leather I got somewhere 100 years ago.

4) Apply Cue Silk to a dime sized area on a paper towel and work it into the shaft with just enough force/speed to get a little heat from the friction.

VOILA! Perfection in shaft slickery (to me anyway).

Now, I think I have to give the Renaissance a twirl, though. Sounds like a great product.

Great thread, btw, MortuaryMike. I (and I'm sure I'm not alone) truly appreciate you going to the trouble and posting your findings for us all. Well done, fine sir!
 

Ak Guy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hog wax?

Clean hands and wiping cue with a micro cloth after a session. Pat Diviney likes Hog Wax, I trust him. This discussion reminds me of a discussion by bench rest shooters on how to clean a match grade rifle barrel.
So there is more then one method that works well. In the end it is what ever is satisfactory to the person doing the shooting.
 
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mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
Wax

Mizerak suggested lighter fluid in one of his early books. I tried it one time with a paper towel very lightly dampened with zippo fluid. All it did was raise the grain big time. Ended up having to sand the loose fibers off and smooth/burnish the shaft back to normal.
Ive tried various waxes over the years, but always go back to a raw wood shaft. To me it just feels better, and stays that way longer. If it feels too 'sticky', the old slightly damp brown paper towel to wipe and burnish it is usually all that I need. If it gets too shiny, I knock it back down with a few light passes of 2000 grit or a q-wiz.

Just out of curiosity for the people who do prefer wax, what is it that makes you like it?

My hands sweat allot and makes stroking a cue impossible, I also have a couple of gloves in my case, and I pack a towel.

On a hot day or night my moist hands are a problem.
I like using wax also helps keep the grit out of the maple shafts grain.
 

victorl

Where'd my stroke go?
Silver Member
Picked up some Renaissance Wax thanks to this thread and I have to say it's the nuts! Works great on the shaft, but I was most surprised at how awesome the butt turned out. It looks it its been refinished and the steel joint looks brand new. Even put a little on the irish linen and it came out great as well.
 

KMRUNOUT

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have been testing out different car waxes on some of my cue shafts.

A friend of mine made commercial car wax for years, he owned the business and was a major supplier of car waxes to all the detail shops in southern California.

He would mix up about 300 gallons of wax at a time.
he also said some of the stuff he put in his car wax was a major heath hazards and protective gear was a must.

To be 100% honest I know very little about car waxes and how to make them.
'Also I don't care for the scent of most car waxes made with natural waxes.


My understanding is there are three different natural waxes that are used to make car wax or wood waxes and they all are petro based.
From what I gather all natural waxes used on cars or wood have some kind of petroleum in them.

The three known natural waxes on cars and wood are carnauba, bee's wax and paraffin wax.

Carnauba has the highest melting point and dries the hardest over bees and paraffin waxes.
But in car waxes it seems that bees wax and paraffin wax is all used in allot of carnauba car waxes too, it is some what of a blend of the 3 waxes.
My guess is paraffin is used because its the cheapest of all three of the waxes.
By the way carnauba wax melting point is right around 170 degrees F.
bees wax is about 120 degree.

Pool cues and musical instruments kind of stand alone, I do not know of any other exotic wooden products that are made to such a high standard and have to with stand us handling it on a weekly or daily bases.

I think melting points, how hard the wax dries, how does the wax smell, how long does the wax last. and do we need to strip the old wax off before applying more wax on, and does the wax keep the shaft nice and slippery are important factors in order for us to come up with the best and most inexpensive way to maintain and protect our cue shafts.

The test
I am going to do is to use 6 different waxes on 6 different shafts and see which waxes hold up the best.
here is the brand names of the wax I plan on using.

Pro Yellow wax ( carnauba ) 14 ounce can, solid wax price is about 10 bucks
and it is petro based. And its combustible :eek:
Strong petro scent

Meguiar's synthetic paste wax , pure synthetic polymer 11 oz can solid wax , costs about 18 bucks , I have no idea if its made with any petro but it is combustible too.
pleasant scent or perfumed.

Howards Feed -N- Wax . 16 OZ its bees wax and orange oil, it is more of a liquid wax and it too is combustible.
strong orange but pleasant scent.

Cue wax is a carnauba wax it is a paste 2 ounces , 7 bucks and it is also combustible, and petro based .
Pleasant scent or perfumed .

Renaissance micro-crystalline wax polish , it is a paste wax petro based and combustible. 7 ounce can is 20 bucks , I have no idea what natural wax is used in Renaissance wax. strong petro scent and it is combustible.

I am going to mix some waxes together and I have some carnauba flakes.
I will be petro base and combustible cost and scent is unknown.....


Here is a link to wiki carnauba wax, carnauba is used from car waxes to wax used on explosives to MM's candy.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnauba_wax

For anyone wanting to add what waxes the use or. if there are any wax experts out there please chime in.

I also would like to publicly say thank you to the member who sent me a can of Renaissance wax. It was a extremely generous act.

Great post, love the idea.

I might add a wax to your list. Long ago I searched this same sort of topic and came across Butcher's Bowling Alley Wax. GREAT stuff! Lasts a long time, very very smooth, has a definite petro smell. But very hard. Try it! I'm curious how it fares against the others.

Thanks,

KMRUNOUT
 

KMRUNOUT

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I appreciate the explanation.

Been there, done it. Don't like it. I'll take clean, raw wood any day over wax.

What is it that you don't like? I've tried both ways over the years. I'm curious if you could give any reasons for your position.

Thanks,

KMRUNOUT
 

KMRUNOUT

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I use this with great success.

http://www.godinguitars.com/store/us/c378133653p17675177.2.html

Apply on a fresh cleaned sealed shaft...burnish at high speed first with a paper towel then with a clean piece of leather to heat it up slightly. Slick, sealed and smooth as glass.
If it is good enough for thousands of dollar guitar finishes. Then its good enough for your cue shafts.

You can also get it in a larger size bottle:

http://www.godinguitars.com/store/us/c378133653p17675176.2.html

Interesting. However one significant factor is that guitars have a *finish* on them, and this is intended to go over that finish. Cue shafts are essentially bare wood. I imagine the requirements are quite a bit different.

Thoughts?

KMRUNOUT
 

mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
Wax

Great post, love the idea.

I might add a wax to your list. Long ago I searched this same sort of topic and came across Butcher's Bowling Alley Wax. GREAT stuff! Lasts a long time, very very smooth, has a definite petro smell. But very hard. Try it! I'm curious how it fares against the others.

Thanks,

KMRUNOUT

Yes I have tried it allot, good wax , might be as good as anything else I have used so far.

Butchers wax is made from a natural wax like Carnauba, all carnauba based waxes use certain petroleum products, not all these products are healthy ...................

I like the renaissance wax , but according to my research the pure polymer ( synthetic wax ) has a higher melting point and dries as hard if not harder then Carnauba wax which has the highest melt point of all know waxes or at least what research I have done.
The only thing I don't like about the synthetic is it takes a long time to dry.
I don't know 100% fact because I never could come up with a USDS sheet for Renaissance wax but I think it is paraffin based , if so there are other waxes that dry harder and have higher melting points, But I still like the wax allot .

All of the Automotive paste waxes have worked pretty good.
There are a couple of chemicals in the in all the natural car waxes I don't like and I fully believe these chemical could be a health hazard.

From that prospective the synthetic wax might be the safest.
 

KMRUNOUT

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have to say this has been an awesome thread. Refreshingly useful and well organized.

Well done sir!

KMRUNOUT
 

The Captain

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
MY tried and true method throughout my 30+ years playing... To clean, I use Fantastik sprayed on a paper towel and rubbed good on the shaft and ferrule, Then burnish again with worn in sueded leather, then burnish again with good old fashioned cheap wax paper. Everyone is always impressed/jealous/envious/etc... of how clean (a very light broken in patina), and slick my shafts always are. Just what works for ME. Not better than nor worse than anyone elses... just my routine.
 

Hal2

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Tascarella

I recently bought a Tasc and have been shocked by the finish on the shafts. I don't know what Pete uses, but they stay amazingly smooth and can just be wiped down with a damp towel afterwards to regain the same smooth finish. I've been looking far and wide to find out what Pete uses, but no luck, so I welcome your test and your results as additional guidance. But if you can, I would try to find out what Pete uses and incorporate his wax into your test as well.
Look forward to your results.

I love the special sealer that Pete uses on his shafts too! And Alcohol will not remove it. Best Regards
 
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