Shaft Wax ( Discussing methods of shaft maintenace )

fjk

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thanks for all the help and advice guys.

To be honest, I can't recall where I learned or who taught me how to take care of shafts.

Here is my simple logic, I'm not sure if it's correct:

-Wax breaks down and actually causes a sticky shaft...especially in a warm and humid pool room.

-I use a cleaner (such as Fantastic) to remove chalk. While more cleaner seems to work better than less, I immediately wipe it dry. I then let the shaft sit for a few hours before burnishing it. My logic is moisture is an enemy of wood in terms of warping so I don't want to burnish / seal in any moisture.

--When I burnish the shaft with a piece of leather, I don't go overboard creating heat. It seems like heat would also be a catalyst for warping.

-Lastly, I'm a big fan for friction fit cases such as a Ron Thomas case. I believe they do a better job of sealing out environmental moisture.

Anyway, I've had good luck with this methodology. Most of my shafts are from the 60s and 70s and they are all dead straight, clean, and feel great (and my hands sweat a lot when I play).

Obviously none of my shafts are spliced so I can't comment on those. I do have a cheap production cue though...It's probably 15 years old and that shaft is clean and dead straight too.
 

JoeyA

Efren's Mini-Tourn BACKER
Silver Member
Below are the two waxes that I use. They both help to keep the shafts cleaner.

MINWAX: Paste Finishing Wax, (for regular maple shafts.)

MOTHERS: California Gold, Brazilian Carnauba CLEANER WAX. (for DymondWood cues/shafts)

FTR, I haven't tried using the TWO WAXES together.

JoeyA
 

Nuts4Tascarellas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
wax

Hey Mike,
I have done a similar test to yours. I found that Renaissance wax is best. It dries very fast and is easy to quickly build up coats. It seems to be the most durable too. I find the scent to be pleasant. I also use it on the butt of the cue for extra protection. It actually works really nicely on lizard wraps.
 

pocket

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have tried a lot of waxes in my time and have only found two of the popular ones good enough for cue shafts. That is the Cue Wax and the Renaissance Wax made for protecting paintings. Those are the only two I have found that give the smooth silky feel. Butchers, Bowling Alley and Car wax all create a little friction drag instead of that silky smooth stroke. Cue Wax smells better than Renaissance Wax so the Cue Wax is best for me.

Did you mean Q Wax?

http://www.amazon.com/ChemPak-Q-Wax...e=UTF8&qid=1428091761&sr=8-2&keywords=cue+wax
 

Cuebuddy

Mini cues
Silver Member
I have tried a lot of waxes in my time and have only found two of the popular ones good enough for cue shafts. That is the Cue Wax and the Renaissance Wax made for protecting paintings. Those are the only two I have found that give the smooth silky feel. Butchers, Bowling Alley and Car wax all create a little friction drag instead of that silky smooth stroke. Cue Wax smells better than Renaissance Wax so the Cue Wax is best for me.


Thanks for the info. Is the cue wax you speak of your own product? There are a few.


https://www.google.com/search?q=Cue...TdoATf3IDYAQ&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAg&biw=1280&bih=899
 

prewarhero

guess my avatar
Silver Member
I recently bought a Tasc and have been shocked by the finish on the shafts. I don't know what Pete uses, but they stay amazingly smooth and can just be wiped down with a damp towel afterwards to regain the same smooth finish. I've been looking far and wide to find out what Pete uses, but no luck, so I welcome your test and your results as additional guidance. But if you can, I would try to find out what Pete uses and incorporate his wax into your test as well.
Look forward to your results.

Yeah, this is the nuts. His new closely guarded secret shaft finish (though some azers know but won't share :( ) compares to nothing else out there. It has almost a glass like feel to it. Older Richard Harris shafts were the closest to it but not the same. Richards new wax or finish seems to be just the norm.
 

2strong4u

Banned
this is a great discussion.

I would like to hear any opinions on unique products cue wax:

http://www.uniqueinc.com/inc/sdetail/721/810

i've used this a few times but would like to see the comparisons to other products.
The unique is good to use after a deep cleaning. The liquid really gets into the wood. The Q wax is great to everyday use. I keep a small container of it to apply while playing. Keeps the stroke smooth in humid and dirty conditions. The places I play are not the cleanest and during summer months it gets real sticky in the northeast.
 

skins

Likes to draw
Silver Member
Hey Mike,
I have done a similar test to yours. I found that Renaissance wax is best. It dries very fast and is easy to quickly build up coats. It seems to be the most durable too. I find the scent to be pleasant. I also use it on the butt of the cue for extra protection. It actually works really nicely on lizard wraps.

I've been using a Renassaince wax for many years. I use it on every area of the cue, shafts, linen or leather wraps, finishes, caps, bumpers.... Everything.. It really does a nice job sealing linen. Leaves the wrap with a nice smooth feel.
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just received my new custom cue yesterday........and the first thing I did was burnish the shafts with two different type leathers and then I treated the shafts with Craftsman Cue Wax.

I've posted about this wax before on the Forum and everyone that's tried it and posted their evaluation was always over the top praise.......I've tried every wax imaginable since 1985.......this is the best.......it's only available by overseas shipping because Craftsman Cues is located in Birmingham, England.

The wax is frequently listed on ebay in quantities of 3 tins plus shipping which makes it pricey, probably around $11-12 per can because of shipping........it's worth the price.....don't ship tins during hot weather (above low 90's temp) because the wax will liquify and will never recover to its original consistency. It comes in a semi-soft paste similar to some shoe polishes.

If you are interested, contact Simon Brown at Craftsman Cues......you can tell him Matt from California referred you........he's a stand-up guy.

Matt B.
 

Tommy-D

World's best B player...
Silver Member
These are the ones I've tried.

The first one I ever saw was the Karseal in the small tin can. I tried it,and went back and bought all 3 cans the place had left. It took a while,but I eventually ran out. VERY good stuff.

I tried another brand (Chem-Pak) in a plastic container kinda like Chris' product. Also quite good.

I decided to try and get it in bigger quantity and couldn't find it,but I eventually tried the Mother's California Gold. Best results so far,but became hard to get locally.

Next up was Meguiar's #26. It was every bit as good as Mother's. It eventually became hard to get unless you bought "old stock" online because they quit making it or reformulated.

Then came Meguiar's Gold Class. It's a fine product,but always felt like it was missing something.

I bought a small can of Renaissance and liked it REAL well,but a buddy saw it and bought it from me for maintenance on his guns,so I didn't get to use much of it (3 shafts).

I found a Sex Wax variant made for skateboards,and it's REALLY slick,but doesn't stay that way for long without moderate maintenance and it almost HAS to be applied on a lathe.

Last,and so far the best stuff I've found yet is the Longoni Special Wax that Atlas sells. It seems like it lasts longer than others and when used in combination with my sealing/polishing process,it even impresses ME when I feel the finished product. I've even used it on customer's shafts and felt it weeks later and I'm like "damn this feels as good as it did when I took it out of the lathe".

There is a custom blend of lemon oil,beeswax,and alcohol sold by Warwick Basses that I've never had a chance to feel on a cue shaft,but is AWESOME on a guitar or bass neck. It's probably only available thru Warwick though.

I haven't tried the Butcher's,Johnson J-Wax,or some of the others yet.

Also,one of the things I use for just routine maintenance on the spot is a microfiber rag I "impregnated" with whatever wax I'm using at the time and a little white polishing compound you find in the green can (Turtle Wax). Tommy D.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't get the whole wax thing. Who thought of that? Are you seriously going to say that the wax will never rise to the surface and get on your hand?

How does any serious player use wax?
 

mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
wax

I don't get the whole wax thing. Who thought of that? Are you seriously going to say that the wax will never rise to the surface and get on your hand?

How does any serious player use wax?

Yup in less your hands temp runs 170 degrees. the wax should never get soft enough to get on your hands...........................

Melting point on carnauba wax is 170 degrees, and it is the hardest known natural wax.

it is also known for being able to put many coats of wax on and it will not flake.

All of this info was posted in the opening thread.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnauba_wax
Did you even read the opening post ?

I posted the link for the carnauba wax so everyone can educate themselves if they wish too ..............

If you don't get something then I there is only a few options .
#1 Research it until you understand it, ( read books, Google it . go to school general educational tools .)
#2 Or be willing ignorant and not research it and scuff at the people who have or who are researching the different kinds of waxes and form some kind of educated guess on whether or not they chose to use wax on they cue shaft and if they do what wax might do the best job.

Because you said you don't get, It kind of leaves the option out of your happy with the way your shaft is now and you don't wish to make any changes regardless if wax would help or not.

I see the pro's wearing gloves and bridge hand friction is a major issue with some or most serous players.

Personally I want a smooth stroke with the least possible friction.
 

mortuarymike-nv

mortuarymike-nv
Silver Member
Wax

Hey Mike,
I have done a similar test to yours. I found that Renaissance wax is best. It dries very fast and is easy to quickly build up coats. It seems to be the most durable too. I find the scent to be pleasant. I also use it on the butt of the cue for extra protection. It actually works really nicely on lizard wraps.

I agree
I have only used the Renaissance wax on maple shafts so far and I think I like it better then the carnauba wax.

I will test it against the synthetic polymer wax next.

Ps good post thank you
 

arps

tirador (ng pansit)
Silver Member
this. for butt and shaft.
 

Ak Guy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Lots of wax

I think more then one type of wax works. Pat Diviney told me he likes "hog wax" for his cues and he has made cues for years and for more then one pro player. This exchange of info reminds me of the article I read on the best ways to clean a gun barrel. The 7 professional gun scribes all had a different method and got good results. Just saying...
 

JoeyA

Efren's Mini-Tourn BACKER
Silver Member
Cleanliness • Shaft Maintenance • Help prevent diameter size reduction

Serious players probably amount to less than 1% of the pool playing population. I am not in the category of a "serious player" but.......I think there are some very good reasons for using wax, regardless of whether you are a "serious player" or not. A couple are as follows.

I like applying wax to my DymondWood shafts because it reduces the amount of chalk that gets imbedded in the shaft wood and makes cleaning the shaft, easier. I don't like to sand my shafts even with 2,000 grit sandpaper because I like for them to remain the same size as how I had them made. So, the wax keeps some of the grit of the chalk from creating additional friction in my hand and helps with maintaining the shaft's cleanliness and I don't have to be concerned about reducing the diameter of my shaft by using abrasives to remove the chalk.

I don't know if wax gets on your hand when playing or not. I use a glove and wash that glove regularly and don't notice any increased friction that might be related to a glove being clogged with wax. Mostly I am concerned about the glove being clogged with chalk, but I will keep an eye out for the wax, although if I continue to wash the gloves, I am hoping that any wax residue would be removed along with the chalk.

I guess if you like looks, a highly-polished and waxed DymondWood shaft is very attractive as well. Mostly, I am more concerned with performance so the "looks" are just lagniappe.

JoeyA

I don't get the whole wax thing. Who thought of that? Are you seriously going to say that the wax will never rise to the surface and get on your hand?

How does any serious player use wax?
 
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