Straight pool specialists

Wayne Crimi

Member
The only 14.1 specialist today has to be Steve Lipsky. There is video of him playing in a ten ball event years ago against Jorge Rodriguez and I believe that has been the only time he has ever dabbled in anything that was not straight pool.

Steve Kurtz is a 14.1 only player but I don't believe he's ever played in any pro events.

Tom Walter is a 14.1 only player. At least I've never heard of him playing in anything but 14.1 events.

Would Don Polo and Kevin Clark be considered 14.1 specialists?

As for old time players, sjm pretty much answered it.


I have no idea what he's doing now or what he thinks these days, but I know Tom Walters used to gamble at 9 ball in the Golden Cue many years ago even though he way preferred 14.1
 

poolnut7879

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm wondering if anyone knew that Robin Dreyer, pool instructor for over 30 years living in Portland, Oregon, teaches every pool game but his love is 14.1? I've never taken a lesson from him on that pool game, only 8 and 9 ball. I still do not play 14.1 or one pocket as I know of no one that wants to play those games. I'm just writing this in case anyone who lives close to him for a 14.1 lesson. He told me he's planning on writing a book on the 14.1 game.
What’s his high run?
 

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
14.1 Pool list 4.3K Threads.
Not one single specialist poster here has ever displayed any personal knowledge of having ever been a specialist.
A specialist should know how to perform all pertinent forms of the competitive aspects of the 14.1 Continuous Billiards Pocket Pool game.
They should be able to tell you how, when, where and why they do whatever it is that they are about to do and demonstrate their expertise so that their grandmothers could understand it.
HI don’t think any exist since Mosconi left.
Mosconi posted here? I wasn't aware.
As to your contention, there's more than one person on this forum capable but they have to, and have, offered up info, but in small bites.
If you yourself were knowledgeable about the game you'd recognize that to thoroughly break down and explain in the necessary detail, even one small aspect of the game, the word count would be off the charts.
I've put up some extremely long posts about 14.1 situations but when reviewing them thought them to be incomplete.
 

justnum

Billiards Improvement Research Projects Associate
Silver Member
How to make 14.1 great again is what a specialist would develop today.

Straight is like solitaire on the cpu. Its a fun counting and measuring game.

For todays youth I would say there are many professionals they can meet in the pool world. Acting right in a pool tournament is a better screening process than college or a work portfolio.

I try to tell them to make it a habit and get to know regulars.
 

sparkle84

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Incomplete and small bites, also mean that you can never explain what you don't know about the game of 14.1 Continuous Billiards Pocket Pool.
Many of the posters here, also think that they're just playing solitaire and only need to have fun and know how to count to ever how high that you may run a few balls into the pockets and that the only restrictions are how high you can count to or your age.
Talk about cherry picking and taking things out of context. I hope most people who read what I said understood how it was meant as you obviously didn't.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't think there is such a thing as a straight pool specialist. Anyone that excelled in straight pool would also excel at any other game. The loan exception I'd say would be bank pool. But they'd figure that out real quick.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The only 14.1 specialist today has to be Steve Lipsky. There is video of him playing in a ten ball event years ago against Jorge Rodriguez and I believe that has been the only time he has ever dabbled in anything that was not straight pool.

Steve Kurtz is a 14.1 only player but I don't believe he's ever played in any pro events.

Tom Walter is a 14.1 only player. At least I've never heard of him playing in anything but 14.1 events.

Would Don Polo and Kevin Clark be considered 14.1 specialists?

As for old time players, sjm pretty much answered it.
Just reading some of this thread for the first time...

-Lipsky was on the IPT tour and turned down the tour card to keep his day job (good decision by him in retrospect!). I can't remember if he got on via invitation or winning a qualifier.
-Polo was a tour stop regular on the Tim Scruggs 9 Ball Tour in the PA/NJ/DE area in the late 90's. He did quite well each event.
-Clark gambles regularly with 700 plus fargo players in 9 ball. There is even a video of him from a couple months ago doing quite well against Fedor. I think it was a Turningstone event.
 

measureman

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just reading some of this thread for the first time...

-Lipsky was on the IPT tour and turned down the tour card to keep his day job (good decision by him in retrospect!). I can't remember if he got on via invitation or winning a qualifier.
-Polo was a tour stop regular on the Tim Scruggs 9 Ball Tour in the PA/NJ/DE area in the late 90's. He did quite well each event.
-Clark gambles regularly with 700 plus fargo players in 9 ball. There is even a video of him from a couple months ago doing quite well against Fedor. I think it was a Turningstone event.
Tim Scruggs 9 Ball Tour in the PA/NJ/DE area
Never heard of this tour?
 

Positively Ralf

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
From about 1998 to 2002. Open 9 ball with about $70 entry. Used to fill up at 64 players.

I wish more local tours did this, specially with amateurs. I believe a 32 player cap tournament would fill up easily if announced.

Come to think of it, is there an agreed upon fargo number rating that distinguishes what an amateur is before getting to Open level status?
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... is there an agreed upon fargo number rating that distinguishes what an amateur is before getting to Open level status?
No. However, you can look at the AZB money list, decide what constitutes the minimum annual winnings to be classified as a professional pool player, and look at the FargoRate ratings of all the players who won that much or more. When I did that, it seems that 770 is a reasonable minimum rating that says the player could make a living at pool. You may have a different minimum annual income in mind.

But there are lots of tournaments that use a cap on ratings. Some of those events have caps under 600. I guess that puts a range of nearly 200 points in limbo, neither fish nor shark.
 

Positively Ralf

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
No. However, you can look at the AZB money list, decide what constitutes the minimum annual winnings to be classified as a professional pool player, and look at the FargoRate ratings of all the players who won that much or more. When I did that, it seems that 770 is a reasonable minimum rating that says the player could make a living at pool. You may have a different minimum annual income in mind.

But there are lots of tournaments that use a cap on ratings. Some of those events have caps under 600. I guess that puts a range of nearly 200 points in limbo, neither fish nor shark.

Thanks for the answer.

That would be an interesting thing to look at because here in NY, you know who the Open level players are like Jimmy Rivera, Jorge Rodriguez and Joey Korsiak and those guys hover in the 700 range last time i checked. They are still allowed to play in amateur tournaments but have a huge handicap against them.

It made me think of a couple of years ago now that someone capped a tournament in this area at 650 fargo because they felt that was the cutoff between top amateur and open level.
 

iusedtoberich

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
For clarification, when I used the word "open" for the old Scruggs tour, it was to mean there were zero handicaps, and it was open to any man, women, child under the sun, whether banger or Efren.

Open the way you are saying it is skill level. Yes, players like Joey Korsiak, Eddie Abraham, Josh Brothers, etc, would be Open under the old system of Banger, D, C, B, A, Open, Pro. Now with the fargo ratings, I think that terminology is fading. Those players are all in the 700-740 range in the Fargo system. Above that I think a lot would consider "pro".
 
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