stroking straight question

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just a guess because I can't see you shooting but you may be standing too close to the cue ball. Take a half or a step back in your stance. It may change your perspective. See if that helps.

I don't have a lot of time at the moment to comment but I went through this same journey over the last decade (also a lefty). I play pretty well but that small alignment problem was one of the things preventing me from getting to the next level.

Fran, if you recall, my solution was to stop shooting with my dominant left eye over the cue. I now shoot with the right eye pretty much centered over the cue and both feet perpendicular to the shot line. Odd, and sometimes I second guess myself, but when I look at the results on the table I can't complain. If I was able to tell myself 10 years ago that this is how I was going to shoot I would have thought I was on drugs!

I now wonder if some players of the past like Mosconi or Murphy really were opposite eye dominant of if I stumbled onto what also worked for them.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't have a lot of time at the moment to comment but I went through this same journey over the last decade (also a lefty). I play pretty well but that small alignment problem was one of the things preventing me from getting to the next level.

Fran, if you recall, my solution was to stop shooting with my dominant left eye over the cue. I now shoot with the right eye pretty much centered over the cue and both feet perpendicular to the shot line. Odd, and sometimes I second guess myself, but when I look at the results on the table I can't complain. If I was able to tell myself 10 years ago that this is how I was going to shoot I would have thought I was on drugs!

I now wonder if some players of the past like Mosconi or Murphy really were opposite eye dominant of if I stumbled onto what also worked for them.

Dan, out of the hundreds and hundreds of players I've coached over the years, you're the first one who said they consistently shoot with better results with their recessive eye over the cue.

If it works for you, then congratulations, but my first question to a player like yourself would be how dominant is the eye in that your cue doesn't want to drift under it naturally? With most players with a distinctly dominant eye, if they try to change their cue position, it always wants to float back under the dominant eye because that is the eye that sends the visual information to the brain first.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Dan, out of the hundreds and hundreds of players I've coached over the years, you're the first one who said they consistently shoot with better results with their recessive eye over the cue.

If it works for you, then congratulations, but my first question to a player like yourself would be how dominant is the eye in that your cue doesn't want to drift under it naturally? With most players with a distinctly dominant eye, if they try to change their cue position, it always wants to float back under the dominant eye because that is the eye that sends the visual information to the brain first.

I know, its weird. I try every once in awhile to shoot with my dominant eye over the cue but now that just looks wrong. I'm sure I could force myself to change back but now when I just get down to shoot it is my right eye that is over the cue.

I suspect that 99.999% of the population does not spend as much time and effort on this as I have. My goal was to have a perfectly straight pull back and forward stroke including follow through to stop. It ain't easy but I'm pretty close to that now and the non conventional set up that I use is what i had to do to get me there.

It's still a bit new to me and I'm now working on ingraining the set up to make it automatic. Sometimes I do revert ever so slightly to a different set up, but never with my dominant eye back over the cue. When I start getting inferior results that's when I know I'm drifting away.

I hope the OP considers this on topic because it could be of help to him as well.
 

z0nt0n3r

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I know, its weird. I try every once in awhile to shoot with my dominant eye over the cue but now that just looks wrong. I'm sure I could force myself to change back but now when I just get down to shoot it is my right eye that is over the cue.

I suspect that 99.999% of the population does not spend as much time and effort on this as I have. My goal was to have a perfectly straight pull back and forward stroke including follow through to stop. It ain't easy but I'm pretty close to that now and the non conventional set up that I use is what i had to do to get me there.

It's still a bit new to me and I'm now working on ingraining the set up to make it automatic. Sometimes I do revert ever so slightly to a different set up, but never with my dominant eye back over the cue. When I start getting inferior results that's when I know I'm drifting away.

I hope the OP considers this on topic because it could be of help to him as well.

when you change your head position over the cue,i think this also slightly changes the alignment of some other body parts in your setup & also while down on the shot(elbow,shoulders,grip etc).so how do you know that it was your head position change that made a difference and it wasn't something else in your body/cue alignment?i'm slightly left-eye dominant and i've tried all head positions but they all result in the same crooked backswing,(cue moves away from my body from my point of view,so i'm twisting my wrist slightly on the forward stroke to bring the cue back in line).my issue could be that as i'm getting down on the shot my cue is not placed on the line of the aim but very slightly across it and the reason that it seems to me that i have a crooked backswing is because my stroking arm travels in a different path from the line of aim and i'm compensating for it by turning my wrist.but of course the problem could be something else entirely.

steve davis talks about this issue at 4:50
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFWYjk-qLhM
 
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luhta

Registered
I have this issue with straight in shots i cant seem to sort out and actually this occurs in cut shots too but its easiest to explain with straight ins. I have tried numerous things to fix it but still it bothers. So, i line up for the shot, get down, everything feels relaxed and i start my feathering, now the problem is i see my cue being tilted to left in my vision, not by much but still enough to notice that (im left handed) but actually this is when im stroking straight and center cue ball. I have recorded myself and when i try to change my posture so that my eyes see everything straight i tend to cut the straight in shot to the left and its also noticeable in my videos that when i do line up the way i think i see everything straight im actually sighting to cut the ball to left. I have tried to find a head position where this would disappear but havent found a solution, same thing with stance. So now im at the point i would like someone wiser to say what should i do, i play good already, but i think this is the issue that is now holding me back and it bothers me. Any advice is appreciated.

I could add to this that if i video myself from front, with relaxed stance, wrist and everything i line up the shot correct, but my eyes say my cue is tilted, i can fix this by turning my wrist out just a hair and everything i see now is straight, but actually im cutting the shot now, i still can make straight in shot this way, but this way when i start my forward swing i steer the shot to left to get my finish position right again. I tried to take a step back but it didnt seem to help the issue..
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
I could add to this that if i video myself from front, with relaxed stance, wrist and everything i line up the shot correct, but my eyes say my cue is tilted, i can fix this by turning my wrist out just a hair and everything i see now is straight, but actually im cutting the shot now, i still can make straight in shot this way, but this way when i start my forward swing i steer the shot to left to get my finish position right again. I tried to take a step back but it didnt seem to help the issue..
Try either moving your cue a little in the same direction the cue is pointed (cue more under your vision center), or moving your head a little in the opposite direction (vision center more over the cue).

pj
chgo
 
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Low500

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just a guess because I can't see you shooting but you may be standing too close to the cue ball. Take a half or a step back in your stance. It may change your perspective. See if that helps.
An absolutely EXCELLENT piece of coaching.
(Seldom mentioned by any of the 'big shot fat bellies' I've seen around.)
That information exemplifies perfectly that you know what you're talking about, Ms. Crimi.
I salute you.
Keep on punchin' :thumbup:
 

One Pocket John

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
hi everyone i have a question,if someone has little wobbles in his stroke and isn't delivering the cue straight,how does he know that it is due to something wrong in his technique or due to not practicing enough on straight cueing to groove his upper arm muscles?or maybe because of both of the above?also if you do the up & down exercise with low/medium power,how many times out of 10 do you need to get the cue ball to come back to your tip in order to say that your stroke is fine?

I've waited a few months for someone to offer you a couple of tools that may help you correct the issues you may be having.

I'm attaching two images. The pvc pipes are 3/4" x 12" for use on a 9' table. If your practicing on a smaller table the pvc lengths should be shortened to maybe 8".

Align your body using your eyes where the two pipes appear to be in line then bend down into the shooting position..............are the two pipes still in line with each other?
Your bridge (the "V" if using an open bridge) hand, shooting shoulder, tip of your elbow and grip hand should all be on this line. What would really let you see your line up would be to take a frontal video with your Iphone or other recording device.

Lets assume the two pipes are NOT lined up when down in the shooting position. I encourage you to visit the the two youtube videos below, they tell you how to exactly align your body with the shot line.

It's going to take you 2 or 3 months of practicing the body alignment with the shot line every day before it becomes automatic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGBFRln32uo&t=2s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPn3Wzp4NT8&t=9s

If after all of this, if your still having issues then your vision center may be off while in the standing position. That's something that can be addressed
later.

No comments about the tables condition please..........it's a well used tool.

Lot of work ahead for ya, but hang in there. :)

John
 

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Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
when you change your head position over the cue,i think this also slightly changes the alignment of some other body parts in your setup & also while down on the shot(elbow,shoulders,grip etc).so how do you know that it was your head position change that made a difference and it wasn't something else in your body/cue alignment?i'm slightly left-eye dominant and i've tried all head positions but they all result in the same crooked backswing,(cue moves away from my body from my point of view,so i'm twisting my wrist slightly on the forward stroke to bring the cue back in line).my issue could be that as i'm getting down on the shot my cue is not placed on the line of the aim but very slightly across it and the reason that it seems to me that i have a crooked backswing is because my stroking arm travels in a different path from the line of aim and i'm compensating for it by turning my wrist.but of course the problem could be something else entirely.

steve davis talks about this issue at 4:50
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFWYjk-qLhM

Zonton (if that really is your name :)) as a fellow leftie I feel your pain! It is refreshing for a change not to have to convert everything I read from a rightie's point of view.

You are right that every change you make potentially changes something else. My experience is that you are not going to find one magic bullet that solves everything, but you may well find the one thing that causes the majority of the problem. If that is the case, then other issues become apparent. For instance, you might get the alignment right but then have a problem with not having a smooth transition so you miss just like you did before, and then you have to work on those things to continue your improvement.

To illustrate the point further, I'd say that you've made certain conclusions that might even be wrong. You said that you stroke back off line and as a result you twist your wrist to bring it back in line. What if it is the other way around? Consider this: Maybe you tend to twist your wrist as you come forward and that is causing you to bring the cue back off line, which would be the opposite of what you think is happening. I think every player tends to curl the cue under since the fingers wrap around the cue from one side. When you jab the stroke or hit hard it is natural for the fingers to tighten and curl. Your brain is clever so it will figure out how to pocket balls when you are twisting the cue. Maybe in your case you learned to take the cue back cockeyed to compensate. Just food for thought. Everyone understands that the cue should not rotate as you shoot. That is easy to see but not always easy to fix. I would make sure you are not twisting that cue AT ALL before fiddling too much with your vision. Maybe you'll get lucky and things will fall into place when you stop curling the wrist and/or fingers. Shoot slowly at first and do what you have to do to pocket balls without twisting the cue.

I'll give you one example of what I was dealing with as it might help. I found that when I took the cue back and it stopped before going forward again I was pulling the cue in toward my body just a little before I went forward again. It was like clockwork and amazingly predictable. Pull back straight, pull cue in maybe a quarter inch, then stroke straight forward. This worked fine for years but at higher speeds things broke down as it does for most people, and I felt this "swoop" had to go. So what caused me to make the swoop? It was my visual alignment. When I got down on a shot the cue would look straight through the line of aim but in reality the butt end of the cue was too far away from my body. Again, it LOOKED perfect from the half of the shaft forward that I could see, but it wasn't. My brain learned to pull the cue inward onto the real shot line just before I came forward with the cue so that the ball would be pocketed. I personally don't think anymore that having the cue "look" lined up before the shot is all that necessary. What is necessary is that the cue IS perfectly on line and perfectly stroked. Whatever that looks like to you will become the new normal and like second nature, IMO.

I'm realizing that I can go on for too long here so I'll cut it short. IMO, the single most important thing I did was to get an app like Coach's Eye to allow you to draw lines over the video for reference points. You also need to be very precise about getting a straight in shot and a camera angle that is exactly on this line. If the camera is off line it will fool you (use the grid lines to help with aligning two balls). You don't need lasers etc if you have that. That's assuming you are working on this yourself and not getting in touch with a good instructor. I think, personally, at the higher levels of play you need to figure out things for yourself, but a check up with an instructor that you trust is a good thing.

Disclaimer and fine print: I am not an instructor. I'm simply relaying my experience with the stroke.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
An absolutely EXCELLENT piece of coaching.
(Seldom mentioned by any of the 'big shot fat bellies' I've seen around.)
That information exemplifies perfectly that you know what you're talking about, Ms. Crimi.
I salute you.
Keep on punchin' :thumbup:

Why does this guy find it impossible to compliment someone without insulting others at the same time. He does it on nearly every post and it gets old. :angry:

No, I don't have a pot belly yet.
 

Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You have no idea how many people YOU insult on nearly every post YOU make.
You don't like what I post...then the IGNORE feature is your friend. Use it.
:mad:

You've been strutting around AZ like a peacock chirping about how great life is because you have all the troublemakers like me on ignore. You've been recommending that everybody put the troublemakers on ignore for months, yet curiously you yourself don't do it.

:confused:

Personally I like to see what everybody has to say. Sometimes you can learn the most from people you disagree with.
 

z0nt0n3r

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I've waited a few months for someone to offer you a couple of tools that may help you correct the issues you may be having.

I'm attaching two images. The pvc pipes are 3/4" x 12" for use on a 9' table. If your practicing on a smaller table the pvc lengths should be shortened to maybe 8".

Align your body using your eyes where the two pipes appear to be in line then bend down into the shooting position..............are the two pipes still in line with each other?
Your bridge (the "V" if using an open bridge) hand, shooting shoulder, tip of your elbow and grip hand should all be on this line. What would really let you see your line up would be to take a frontal video with your Iphone or other recording device.

Lets assume the two pipes are NOT lined up when down in the shooting position. I encourage you to visit the the two youtube videos below, they tell you how to exactly align your body with the shot line.

It's going to take you 2 or 3 months of practicing the body alignment with the shot line every day before it becomes automatic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGBFRln32uo&t=2s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPn3Wzp4NT8&t=9s

If after all of this, if your still having issues then your vision center may be off while in the standing position. That's something that can be addressed
later.

No comments about the tables condition please..........it's a well used tool.

Lot of work ahead for ya, but hang in there. :)

John
good info to consider.
 

z0nt0n3r

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Zonton (if that really is your name :)) as a fellow leftie I feel your pain! It is refreshing for a change not to have to convert everything I read from a rightie's point of view.

You are right that every change you make potentially changes something else. My experience is that you are not going to find one magic bullet that solves everything, but you may well find the one thing that causes the majority of the problem. If that is the case, then other issues become apparent. For instance, you might get the alignment right but then have a problem with not having a smooth transition so you miss just like you did before, and then you have to work on those things to continue your improvement.

To illustrate the point further, I'd say that you've made certain conclusions that might even be wrong. You said that you stroke back off line and as a result you twist your wrist to bring it back in line. What if it is the other way around? Consider this: Maybe you tend to twist your wrist as you come forward and that is causing you to bring the cue back off line, which would be the opposite of what you think is happening. I think every player tends to curl the cue under since the fingers wrap around the cue from one side. When you jab the stroke or hit hard it is natural for the fingers to tighten and curl. Your brain is clever so it will figure out how to pocket balls when you are twisting the cue. Maybe in your case you learned to take the cue back cockeyed to compensate. Just food for thought. Everyone understands that the cue should not rotate as you shoot. That is easy to see but not always easy to fix. I would make sure you are not twisting that cue AT ALL before fiddling too much with your vision. Maybe you'll get lucky and things will fall into place when you stop curling the wrist and/or fingers. Shoot slowly at first and do what you have to do to pocket balls without twisting the cue.

I'll give you one example of what I was dealing with as it might help. I found that when I took the cue back and it stopped before going forward again I was pulling the cue in toward my body just a little before I went forward again. It was like clockwork and amazingly predictable. Pull back straight, pull cue in maybe a quarter inch, then stroke straight forward. This worked fine for years but at higher speeds things broke down as it does for most people, and I felt this "swoop" had to go. So what caused me to make the swoop? It was my visual alignment. When I got down on a shot the cue would look straight through the line of aim but in reality the butt end of the cue was too far away from my body. Again, it LOOKED perfect from the half of the shaft forward that I could see, but it wasn't. My brain learned to pull the cue inward onto the real shot line just before I came forward with the cue so that the ball would be pocketed. I personally don't think anymore that having the cue "look" lined up before the shot is all that necessary. What is necessary is that the cue IS perfectly on line and perfectly stroked. Whatever that looks like to you will become the new normal and like second nature, IMO.

I'm realizing that I can go on for too long here so I'll cut it short. IMO, the single most important thing I did was to get an app like Coach's Eye to allow you to draw lines over the video for reference points. You also need to be very precise about getting a straight in shot and a camera angle that is exactly on this line. If the camera is off line it will fool you (use the grid lines to help with aligning two balls). You don't need lasers etc if you have that. That's assuming you are working on this yourself and not getting in touch with a good instructor. I think, personally, at the higher levels of play you need to figure out things for yourself, but a check up with an instructor that you trust is a good thing.

Disclaimer and fine print: I am not an instructor. I'm simply relaying my experience with the stroke.
i haven't thought of your first idea so i'll take a look at it next time i practice.the problem could be that i haven't learnt to physically move the cue in a straight line rather body alignment or vision center
 

z0nt0n3r

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Zonton (if that really is your name :)) as a fellow leftie I feel your pain! It is refreshing for a change not to have to convert everything I read from a rightie's point of view.

You are right that every change you make potentially changes something else. My experience is that you are not going to find one magic bullet that solves everything, but you may well find the one thing that causes the majority of the problem. If that is the case, then other issues become apparent. For instance, you might get the alignment right but then have a problem with not having a smooth transition so you miss just like you did before, and then you have to work on those things to continue your improvement.

To illustrate the point further, I'd say that you've made certain conclusions that might even be wrong. You said that you stroke back off line and as a result you twist your wrist to bring it back in line. What if it is the other way around? Consider this: Maybe you tend to twist your wrist as you come forward and that is causing you to bring the cue back off line, which would be the opposite of what you think is happening. I think every player tends to curl the cue under since the fingers wrap around the cue from one side. When you jab the stroke or hit hard it is natural for the fingers to tighten and curl. Your brain is clever so it will figure out how to pocket balls when you are twisting the cue. Maybe in your case you learned to take the cue back cockeyed to compensate. Just food for thought. Everyone understands that the cue should not rotate as you shoot. That is easy to see but not always easy to fix. I would make sure you are not twisting that cue AT ALL before fiddling too much with your vision. Maybe you'll get lucky and things will fall into place when you stop curling the wrist and/or fingers. Shoot slowly at first and do what you have to do to pocket balls without twisting the cue.

I'll give you one example of what I was dealing with as it might help. I found that when I took the cue back and it stopped before going forward again I was pulling the cue in toward my body just a little before I went forward again. It was like clockwork and amazingly predictable. Pull back straight, pull cue in maybe a quarter inch, then stroke straight forward. This worked fine for years but at higher speeds things broke down as it does for most people, and I felt this "swoop" had to go. So what caused me to make the swoop? It was my visual alignment. When I got down on a shot the cue would look straight through the line of aim but in reality the butt end of the cue was too far away from my body. Again, it LOOKED perfect from the half of the shaft forward that I could see, but it wasn't. My brain learned to pull the cue inward onto the real shot line just before I came forward with the cue so that the ball would be pocketed. I personally don't think anymore that having the cue "look" lined up before the shot is all that necessary. What is necessary is that the cue IS perfectly on line and perfectly stroked. Whatever that looks like to you will become the new normal and like second nature, IMO.

I'm realizing that I can go on for too long here so I'll cut it short. IMO, the single most important thing I did was to get an app like Coach's Eye to allow you to draw lines over the video for reference points. You also need to be very precise about getting a straight in shot and a camera angle that is exactly on this line. If the camera is off line it will fool you (use the grid lines to help with aligning two balls). You don't need lasers etc if you have that. That's assuming you are working on this yourself and not getting in touch with a good instructor. I think, personally, at the higher levels of play you need to figure out things for yourself, but a check up with an instructor that you trust is a good thing.

Disclaimer and fine print: I am not an instructor. I'm simply relaying my experience with the stroke.

it's been a while since i've posted here but i found what caused the majority of the problem and you may find it interesting.because i'm slightly left-eye dominant i assumed that i needed to align my left eye to the shot line from the standing position and then have the cue slightly towards my left eye when down on the shot.but when i video-taped myself head-on on a straight in shot,i found that i was leaning too much to my right in order to align my left eye,so much that my head was going completely off the shooting line when getting down for the shot and that was causing me to aim offline and compensating by twisting my wrist on a lot of shots.the fix was to align my opposite (right) eye in the standing position to see the shot line,then get down and have the cue slightly towards the left eye as i did before.to achieve this i also needed to twist my body a little bit when getting down on the shot to make my shoulders more angled instead of square to the shot because i use a more square snooker stance.now i think my cueing still needs a bit of improvement,(maybe because i shoot with my elbow a little outside of the line) but my game has improved massively since making this change because now i aim correctly on most shots.
 
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z0nt0n3r

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Hittin off enter a 1/16th of an inch will give me one diamond over for example so take note of that when doing such routines; it’s easy tho can be difficult and it does take very high precision and good alignment to accomplish it perfect.....

First you must use a ball where you can check the chalk mark for the proper hit; the players stroke could be true while their alignment is bad, or vice versa.

It could also very well be the two issues you mentioned. More info is needed for a proper troubleshooting and diagnosis.

Video analysis would tell us the true story

-greyghost


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

yes when doing this routine i must set up the cue ball and a chalk on the rail in a perfectly straight line,if they are a little off the cue ball will not come back to your tip no matter how hard you try, (maybe it will barely hit the edge of the CB on the way back)
 
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Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
it's been a while since i've posted here but i found what caused the majority of the problem and you may find it interesting.because i'm slightly left-eye dominant i assumed that i needed to align my left eye to the shot line from the standing position and then have the cue slightly towards my left eye when down on the shot.but when i video-taped myself head-on on a straight in shot,i found that i was leaning too much to my right in order to align my left eye,so much that my head was going completely off the shooting line when getting down for the shot and that was causing me to aim offline and compensating by twisting my wrist on a lot of shots.the fix was to align my opposite (right) eye in the standing position to see the shot line,then get down and have the cue slightly towards the left eye as i did before.to achieve this i also needed to twist my body a little bit when getting down on the shot to make my shoulders more angled instead of square to the shot because i use a more square snooker stance.now i think my cueing still needs a bit of improvement,(maybe because i shoot with my elbow a little outside of the line) but my game has improved massively since making this change because now i aim correctly on most shots.

That is interesting, congrats on the discovery. Sounds like you might be drifting sideways as you come down on the shot? You should consider posting before and after videos here so people can see what the stroke looks like now.

I personally don't believe the "vision center," as people call it, is all it is cracked up to be. Just because you feel comfortable in a certain position, doesn't mean you can stroke the cue in a straight line from there. You just have to experiment with it and if part of the solution is moving your vision one way or the other, you'll get used to it soon enough.

If you are hitting the ball straighter now, you should feel a more solid hit on the cue ball. There is a difference in feel between hitting dead center vs a tiny amount left or right.
 

z0nt0n3r

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
That is interesting, congrats on the discovery. Sounds like you might be drifting sideways as you come down on the shot? You should consider posting before and after videos here so people can see what the stroke looks like now.

I personally don't believe the "vision center," as people call it, is all it is cracked up to be. Just because you feel comfortable in a certain position, doesn't mean you can stroke the cue in a straight line from there. You just have to experiment with it and if part of the solution is moving your vision one way or the other, you'll get used to it soon enough.

If you are hitting the ball straighter now, you should feel a more solid hit on the cue ball. There is a difference in feel between hitting dead center vs a tiny amount left or right.

thanks,yes in the videos of the old technique you can clearly see my head making a zig-zag as i'm getting down on the shot.i will also take new videos of the new technique to see if what i'm describing here about the new routine is correct and to see if i'm still making a zig-zag with my head.i will also experiment with shooting with my right-eye with the new routine to see if it produces better results.

as far as the vision center goes,i believe whatever position makes you aim/cue better is the best for you and as you said you have to experiment and try all shooting positions.

the new technique makes me get on the correct line of aim more consistently now so i'm almost certain that my cueing has become straighter because now i don't need to cue incorrectly to find the correct line because of landing on the wrong line.but having said that i don't think that i'm hitting the ball as accurately as you are describing.it sounds like you are working on extreme details to make your stroke perfectly straight,i have the same goal too but now i'm satisfied with the current results and i won't work on fine details anymore for now unless i start playing inconsistently again but because i'm curious i may post the videos sometime in the future so maybe we can discuss this even further
 
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Tennesseejoe

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not a lot of thinking to do this ...but it works

Put the cue ball on the head line 1/2 inch off the rail. Now put an object ball a couple inches past the side pocket on the same long rail, also 1/2 inch off the rail. Shoot this several times with follow. This will give you some feeling of shooting straight.

You do not have to over think this situation.
 
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Dan White

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
the new technique makes me get on the correct line of aim more consistently now so i'm almost certain that my cueing has become straighter because now i don't need to cue incorrectly to find the correct line because of landing on the wrong line.but having said that i don't think that i'm hitting the ball as accurately as you are describing.it sounds like you are working on extreme details to make your stroke perfectly straight,i have the same goal too but now i'm satisfied with the current results and i won't work on fine details anymore for now unless i start playing inconsistently again but because i'm curious i may post the videos sometime in the future so maybe we can discuss this even further

Makes sense. Improvement in pool is an ongoing journey where you will gain a new skill, move on to other things, and eventually come back to that skill for further refinement.
 
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