think I need deflection

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
To be clear, I'm not finding fault with the shaft I like the hit, feel etc. It's just really different from what I'm used to.

Was thinking I should dump it last night but something drew me back to it today, it does seem to get the ball around the table well and is starting to make a little more sense.

As far as it taking 2 months to get comfortable with all the shots, I'm lucky, I'm sure I don't know near the number of shots the amateur pros do.
Just wait, you will! ;):)
 

SmoothStroke

Swim for the win.
Silver Member
You could play with a 2x4 if that's all you had, draw may be a little tough but you will adapt.
If Willie played with a LD shaft he may have run 60,000, but he had one of those crappy old rock maple shafts.
 

Loo

New member
I've been waffling about trying a revo shaft for a bit now. Couple people have been nice enough to let me take a few
shots with theirs and I liked the hit. My thinking was a better transfer of energy would be a good thing for me as well.
Bottom line, thought I might be missing something.

I got one, a 12.9 for a 3/8 10 joint. I really do like the way it hits.

I'm not used to ld shafts, had a 314 15 or 20 years ago, went back to maple. After shooting with this revo for half
an hour I kind of realized that I think deflection has a place in my game. For instance shots such as high inside
to make a ball down the rail and go 3 rails back to center it seems the deflection and curve cancel each other out at
the right speed and right tip position. With the revo, that same shot, I feel like I actually have to aim to miss the
ball in order to allow for the swirve.

I'd also read that people think ld is more forgiving about off center hits. I hit some long straight in shots with it, it
seemed more demanding than one of my maple shaft with a short juma ferrule on it.

It really is a nice shaft but as silly as this sounds, I think it need more deflection.
From your description of your rail shot with follow around 3 rails, you’re shooting with back-hand english. Meaning you’re aiming to make the ball as if you weren’t using any English then moving your back hand around to get whatever English you want.

You can still do this with a LD shaft but it requires a significantly longer bridge length, possibly uncomfortably long if you’re not used to it. To figure out the exact bridge length required, set up a medium length straight in shot, aim straight with center ball, then pivot your backhand to center left or center right and stroke medium to hard. If you have the correct bridge length for your shaft you’ll pocket the ball and cue ball will stop in place but spinning like a top. Std deflection cues require around 7-9 inches bridge length, LD shafts 10-12 in my experience.
 

fjk

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I hear you. It’s the same challenge I have with very low squirt shafts. My game was built with the understanding of squirt long before Predator, so switching for me was and is very difficult. Or I should say, if I play with a Predator for a few months, then screw on a shaft with way more deflection, it’’s like coming home and the world is right.

But I love the feel and energy transfer of my Revo (Cornerman style). Solution? Use a CF shaft that had more squirt. In my case, (punny, har har) Predator made me a new Revo that has the same squirt as my normal shooting shafts. My XLR8 CF shaft (Matt Bargerstock) also has about the same amount of squirt. Other CF shafts also have more squirt than the stock Revo shafts. CF doesn’t mean low squirt necessarily.
Same experience here. I tried getting use to a LD shaft. While it hit nice and my shot making actually seemed better, I just didn't play well with it. I tried it for a few months. Finally, one day in a ring game that I was taking a beating in, I switched back to my old maple shaft. I was like someone flipped a switch. It's hard to reprogram 35 years of playing.
 

rjb1168

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
You’ll never see me with an LD shaft on one of my cues. Or looking ladylike with a glove on.
I wear a glove due to scar tissue on the side of my thumb that contacts the shaft.
It takes care of the problem for me.
 

JazzyJeff87

AzB Plutonium Member
Silver Member
What is an amateur pro? I waived it off once but I’ve seen it three times now in this here thread.

And Konrad what is you, craze? A glove is the number one tool in a pool player’s kit. More important even than a cue...almost.

Don’t get me wrong I did start playing at home (when I had my table 😭) raw dawg and just using a little powder when needed but once you’re out and about it’s just a pain and some places don’t allow powder.

And if you forget powder and need it? Omg. I lost a rack and momentum once because I couldn’t draw the ball - I had forgotten my powder and no one had any and my cue would not slide in my bridge, it was skipping. I have never felt so miserable in my life.

Since that day I travel with 3-4 pool gloves and in my car I have another pool glove type thing that at least covers the index and thumb.

You get used to a glove and there’s no going back. The last thing I want to worry about is random friction while I’m cueing.

I live in MD where it’s muggy as hell half the year so I guess westerners may have a different go of it.

LD shafts are cool I guess. I’ve never used a maple so I don’t know how serious the differences are
 

ChicagoRJ

EEEEEXCELLENT ;)
Silver Member
You’ll never see me with an LD shaft on one of my cues. Or looking ladylike with a glove on.
So, golfers and baseball players should lose the gloves too, huh? Meanwhile, they can buy and sell every pool player that ever lived, lol
 

boogieman

It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that ping.
Don’t get me wrong I did start playing at home (when I had my table 😭) raw dawg and just using a little powder when needed but once you’re out and about it’s just a pain and some places don’t allow powder.
Powder is a NEVER. It makes your cue dirty in time and it is never really smooth again. I've used cheap powders, expensive ones, cones and loose powder. On reflection it is all bad.

Pop out any dents with steam. Get a cheap sharpshooter portable lathe (it uses a drill as the motor) and a live center (convex type). Learn to clean your shaft, smooth it with micro finishing films. Burnish the piss out of it with an old paper towel tube, get it good and hot. Finish it with renaissance wax and polish it with cotton. I can get even custom cues much better than when they came from the maker. You just gotta have time and a feel for what is actually smooth.

Clean your hands (boroxo hand cleaner works great but anything will do). Dry your hands well. 4 paper towels from a dispenser. Always use an additional single towel at the end when you think your hands are dry.

No glove needed even in Iowa humidity in a garage. Sure, you could just wear a glove, but what's the fun in that?
 

TheBasics

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Howdy All;

Don't use a glove or powder, just wash my hands when cue starts to feel sticky
and also give the cue a wipe down after each inning or when it feels like it might
be a good idea. 60 years still works.

Also, to return to original topic, experienced the bit about it as fjk did in post #26.
Took it back to the maker and he ran it through this process, gave both shafts a bit
more taper and they work just fine now.

hank
 

BRussell

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I’ve heard people say something like this quite a bit - that there are certain shots that are easier on high-deflection shafts. That doesn’t make sense to me. It seems that if you want to deflect and swerve with a low-deflection shaft, you could always just aim a little different.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I’ve heard people say something like this quite a bit - that there are certain shots that are easier on high-deflection shafts. That doesn’t make sense to me. It seems that if you want to deflect and swerve with a low-deflection shaft, you could always just aim a little different.
I think there may be a few rare shots where a high-squirt shaft might be better. The only ones I can think of now are where you are obstructed from hitting the cue ball in the direction you want but a high-squirt shaft will get you to the line you need. Maybe also if for some very strange reason you need absolutely no hop on the cue ball on a draw shot and the squirt is equal to the minimum cue elevation. In both of those cases you can't aim a little different.
 

BRussell

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I think there may be a few rare shots where a high-squirt shaft might be better. The only ones I can think of now are where you are obstructed from hitting the cue ball in the direction you want but a high-squirt shaft will get you to the line you need. Maybe also if for some very strange reason you need absolutely no hop on the cue ball on a draw shot and the squirt is equal to the minimum cue elevation. In both of those cases you can't aim a little different.
That makes sense. I don’t think I’ll start carrying both shafts types with me though. ;)
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
To all the posters that say a glove is not needed or "ladylike"....try telling MOST of the world's top professionals that.

In any sport (or game), I've come to realize over the years that if the sport's very best are doing it, then there is a good reason for it. Through time and experience, they KNOW what they need to do to make themselves better at what they do.

IMHO, I feel that the pool glove has it's benefits or there wouldn't be so many of the world's best players using one.

Not meaning to hijack. Sorry.

Maniac (now back to your regularly scheduled program)
 

alphadog

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
To all the posters that say a glove is not needed or "ladylike"....try telling MOST of the world's top professionals that.

In any sport (or game), I've come to realize over the years that if the sport's very best are doing it, then there is a good reason for it. Through time and experience, they KNOW what they need to do to make themselves better at what they do.

IMHO, I feel that the pool glove has it's benefits or there wouldn't be so many of the world's best players using one.

Not meaning to hijack. Sorry.

Maniac (now back to your regularly scheduled program)
You never watched Forest Gump ?
 

Mustanglee

New member
Find a Cynergy to try, and report back....;)
I had a Revo and Synergy to try for 30 days. I have a table in my basement so I played almost every day switching back and forth. I kept the Synergy and scent the Revo back. Synergy has a nicer smooth finish and the little white Ferrell. It is also quieter than the revo and has a solid hit and a great transfer of english
 

eg9327

Member
I've played with bar sticks, my own regular shaft, low deflection wood, and now a low deflection carbon. For me the primary concern is consistency. Whatever you play with, STICK WITH IT. You will never find consistency jumping from shaft to shaft. Whenever I've changed shafts I've run through about 60 days of poorer shooting before recovering. Your subconscious will learn and adjust to a new shaft, but it takes time. If the new shaft was intended to overcome some deficiency test yourself and the stick to find out if it worked. If not, go back. If you are like me I convinced myself I needed the latest gimmick, without a real advantage in mind. Sixty days of pain for a purpose that was not clear. After a while going back will force you through another mental retraining period. Is it worth it?
 
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