very graffic lathe accident from a safety meeting

Russell Cues

Maverick Cue Builder
Silver Member
I've seen those pics before, but it is still a stark reminder of what can happen if your shirt wrapped around the work piece.
 

ROB.M

:)
Silver Member
Post

It's important to install a emergency stop on your equipment, this accident should of been prevented. It's terrible this happened.



Rob.M
 

CocoboloCowboy

Cowboys are my heros.
Silver Member
There photos send two messages,follow safety procedutes, and if you don't SH*t Happens. I work for a company call MENASCO in the 1960, we made Aircraft Landing Grear. Big Casesing, and big equiptment to make em into finished product. We had minor injuries, but nothing like what was posted in there photos.
 

Thomas Wayne

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The photos of this particular accident surface every so often, and everytime I see them I think, "Now that's what can happen when you get too wrapped up in your work."

TW
 

Hungarian

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not really funny. Pretty stupid comment from a guy of your stature.

The photos of this particular accident surface every so often, and everytime I see them I think, "Now that's what can happen when you get too wrapped up in your work."

TW
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
It's important to install a emergency stop on your equipment, this accident should of been prevented. It's terrible this happened.



Rob.M

Actually, the most important safety measure would have been safety rules in that shop.
I really don't want to study the pictures . I think he was wearing loose clothing and he was power feeding . His clothing got caught by the tool bit then onto the part he was turning .
I wear a respirator almost all the time and it has garters that overhang .
I trim them.
 

POOLGODBEWITHME

Tom "B" player
Silver Member
I agree

Actually, the most important safety measure would have been safety rules in that shop.
I really don't want to study the pictures . I think he was wearing loose clothing and he was power feeding . His clothing got caught by the tool bit then onto the part he was turning .
I wear a respirator almost all the time and it has garters that overhang .
I trim them.


I agree safety rules need to be in place, but they also needed to be followed. I work in a very large tool and die shop we have many safety rules but the biggest one is "if it spins no gloves or loose clothing". I see pictures, TV shows, videos all the time and people are always wearing gloves around spinning equipment. Even latex or nitrile gloves can get caught in spinning equipment and tear things up pretty bad. Human flesh is not very tough when it comes to spinning lathe chucks ect. When I see guys at work wearing gloves I usually say "come on man don't do that". It's tough to wash your dirty fingers if they're not there anymore. I'm kind of curious as to how many years experience the man in the lathe photo had. Most workplace injuries and fatalities are from complacency or ignorance. The guy with 2 years or less is going to get hurt because he doesn't know any better, the guy with 20+ years "has done it thousands times and not got hurt". I'm still just under 20 years category, so hopfully I'm safe and keep away from complacency. Winter time is tough for me cause I like to wear a long sleeve flannel shirt and leave it unbuttoned (open). My buddies at work will usually remind me when I forget. And I'm thankfull for that. Anytime you remind someone about safety, it could save a life. You need to be "your brothers keeper". There is poem about safety that if I can find a copy of it online I'll post it or a link. If I remember right it's called " I could have saved a life today, but I chose to look the other way". Ok, I think I've typed the most I've ever typed and my fingers hurt now. Have a good day guys and stay safe. Tom
 

POOLGODBEWITHME

Tom "B" player
Silver Member
found the poem

I Chose To Look The Other Way


I could have saved a life that day,
But I chose to look the other way.
It wasn’t that I didn’t care;
I had the time, and I was there.

But I didn’t want to seem a fool,
Or argue over a safety rule.
I knew he’d done the job before;
If I spoke up he might get sore.

The chances didn’t seem that bad;
I’d done the same, he knew I had.
So I shook my head and walked by;
He knew the risks as well as I.

He took the chance, I closed an eye;
And with that act, I let him die.
I could have saved a life that day,
But I chose to look the other way.

Now every time I see his wife,
I know I should have saved his life.
That guilt is something I must bear;
But isn’t’ something you need to share.

If you see a risk that others take
That puts their health or life at stake,
The question asked or thing you say;
Could help them live another day.

If you see a risk and walk away,
Then hope you never have to say,
“I could have saved a life that day,
But I chose to look the other way.”


by: Don Merrill

If you look up the author, he has done a few other safety poems. pretty good stuff. When you witness a serious injury at work, This stuff hit home.
 

JoneseyCues

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
shit happens!

This is a very real reminder to all who chose to work carelessly. A lot of the machines we use to build cues can become extremely dangerous with only a slight lapse in judgement or care. I know a lot of guys that drink beer while working on pool cues. Lathes, saws, jointers, sanding machines can all ruin your day from one split second of carelessness. Drinking was probably not the issue here, but just like driving an automobile, it only takes one time, or one bad move and woops, fingers, arms, lives gone.

Most larger industrial shops have extensive safety precautions and training procedures in place nowadays, but you can never account for carelessness or complacency. Don't wear long sleeves unless its absolutely necessary while working on an engine lathe with a chuck spinning, especially between centers, loose flannel shirts are horrible for working on lathes. Always air on the side of caution, nothing is worth loosing digits or lives over, especially a damn pool cue. Use a dead man switch if possible and have kill switches within reach if working on a powerful piece of equipment at all times!

I've seen many lost fingers, a hand a couple mangled up arms in my career.Welding cylinders shot across the shop like a missile. All of which could have been avoided.
 

greyghost

Coast to Coast
Silver Member
this is not an accident.....accidents cant be prevented by most means. Like some drunk driver blindsiding you. The vast majority of work related injuries occur because someone is too stupid to stop for 5 minutes, think about WTF they are doing for 5 min and then continue in a safe manner.

The only rule is DONT BE STUPID! SAFETY FIRST!

I work around deadly things all day every day, pressures up to 50k PSI, extremely heavy objects etc.....i have never been injured because my safety is the first thing on my mind, everything else is secondary.
 

Thomas Wayne

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not really funny. Pretty stupid comment from a guy of your stature.


I first saw those photos at least a decade ago. So the guy in those photos has been dead for a very long time, and the period for mourning has expired. As has he... but I digress.

It all comes down to your sense of humor, but regardless of whether you think it's funny you certainly can't characterize it as unintelligent - so the irony here is that your calling the comment "stupid" turns out to actually be stupid.

You're obviously not my audience, but perhaps you'll find this more amusing: csókol enyém ülep. Please embrace the sentiment and forgive the bastardized grammar.

TW
 

Tommy-D

World's best B player...
Silver Member
I was shown these pics by our shop instructor the day I started shop school,along with others and a couple videos.

Needless to say,I've heeded those warnings,and still almost got bit by a lathe,although it wasn't a typical scenario.

I built a toolholder for the lathe I typically ran at school and stood by the tailstock as my instructor was testing it.

I leaned in too far,and the tail of my too-long and untucked t shirt got wrapped up in the feed rod,under the leadscrew.

I noticed it in time,and luckily wasn't hurt,but I was made an example of via cell phone pics and a video my instructor made.

Other than that,the closest I've come to really hurting myself was back before I started shop school.

I was using my Enco mini lathe,and was teaching myself to cut a tip down using a utility blade by itself instead of in a handle.

The lathe was running in reverse thankfully due to my ignorance at the time,LOL.

My mistake was in not wiping the oil off the fresh blade,and it grabbed the leather and kicked itself back towards the chuck.

Because it was still oily,it slipped out of my hands,which I quickly jerked back.

The blade flew into the chuck,and thanks to my inexperience the blade went flying backwards instead of towards me.

It buried itself into the paneled wall behind the lathe well over an inch deep,instead of my chest.

Even though I'm very cautious with lathes and mills,you know what worries me more than those 2 machines?

A grinding wheel explosion. Tommy D.
 
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