What’s the Most Frustrating Aspect of Being an Aging Pool Player?

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I know I’ve started threads on here before whining about my diminishing pool skills now in my 60s, but I’m hoping by the title of this thread that the responses might be slightly different this time around.

So I pose this question, what is more depressing and frustrating for an aging pool player who loves the game and hates seeing it dying out?

1) Having all the experience and knowledge acquired in nearly a lifetime (50 years) of playing pool, but no longer being able to execute the shots anywhere near the level of consistency that I used to have? Or

2) The complete absence of having any young players around to allow me the opportunity to pass on this knowledge and experience, in attempt to help them become better players sooner than they otherwise would, and certainly sooner than myself, considering I had no one around to look up to and teach me when I was young?

Yes, I know there are plenty of you out there, most likely under 60, who may feel that advancing years should be no excuse for diminishing pool skills. There is some concrete reason why there have been no major pool titles won anytime recently by players 50 years of age or older, just as in the case of golf, a very similar sport.

I claim that if Tom Watson had been able to make that 6 foot putt to par the 72nd hole of the British Open 10 years ago, just months shy of his 60th birthday, that would have easily been the most remarkable individual sports achievement in history. It would have given many of us the inspiration that anything is possible at our age!
 
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Kevin Lindstrom

14.1 Addict
Silver Member
Just remember Watson didn't miss that 6 foot put because he was 60 years old.

Keep playing and enjoy the game. I know I certainly plan to do the same.

Kevin
 

pwd72s

recreational banger
Silver Member
Hell, I never was a top pool player, nor was I near the top of any sport I played when growing up. As I said on the thread debating natural talent vs. hard work & dedication, I just enjoyed being there. So, I'm probably not one to comment on pool specifically.

But having made 76 trips around the sun, I can comment about old age. Hell, I don't like it one bit! Along with aches an pains, I have a long list of medical issues. Age related macular degeneration cataracts and glaucoma hurting my vision, joint & heart problems, etc.

Nobody in my age group likes being in it. Nobody.

But then, when I consider how many of my peers didn't make it this far?

Well, I'm just enjoying being here. Mostly.

(edit) You did touch on one thing. That is, by the time you're old enough to have learned a few things...the young people don't want to hear it.
 
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Sedog

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Geez, I didn’t start playing until I was 70. Of when you start at that age your shills don’t diminish, they improve. Ha ha.
Why don’t you start playing in a league where you will have a opportunity to pass on the knowledge you’ve gathered over the years.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just remember Watson didn't miss that 6 foot put because he was 60 years old.

Keep playing and enjoy the game. I know I certainly plan to do the same.

Kevin
Are you sure about that? As I recall, he didn’t even scare the hole. It looked to me more like the stroke of your average 60-year-old country club golfer as opposed to one of the greatest golfers of all time. Yes, I realize the intense pressure at that moment was the main cause for that fateful stroke moreso than his age, but don’t for one minute think his age wasn’t a factor!
 
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TATE

AzB Gold Mensch
Gold Member
Silver Member
I know I’ve started threads on here before whining about my diminishing pool skills now in my 60s, but I’m hoping by the title of this thread that the responses might be slightly different this time around.

So I pose this question, what is more depressing and frustrating for an aging pool player who loves the game and hates seeing it dying out?

1) Having all the experience and knowledge acquired in nearly a lifetime (50 years) of playing pool, but no longer being able to execute the shots anywhere near the level of consistency that I used to have? Or

2) The complete absence of having any young players around to allow me the opportunity to pass on this knowledge and experience, in attempt to help them become better players sooner than they otherwise would, and certainly sooner than myself, considering I had no one around to look up to and teach me when I was young?

Yes, I know there are plenty of you out there, most likely under 60, who may feel that advancing years should be no excuse for diminishing pool skills. There is some concrete reason why there have been no major pool titles won anytime recently by players 50 years of age or older, just as in the case of golf, a very similar sport.

I claim that if Tom Watson had been able to make that 6 foot putt to par the 72nd hole of the British Open 10 years ago, just months shy of his 60th birthday, that would have easily been the most remarkable individual sports achievement in history. It would have given many of us the inspiration that anything is possible at our age!

The answer is simple. Because it's folly.

Just look at what you do now and what you don't do.

- Do you practice for the same length of time and intensity as you did when you were younger?

- Do you have the burning desire to prove yourself, display your skills and beat your opponents, to the extreme where it can be labeled an obsession?

- Do you have a structured, daily regimen to work on your skills, learn new ones, play games that advance your skills and address your weaknesses?

- Do you come to the table rested, with energy, focus and passion?

- Do you have the confidence that you are 100% ready for your match?

- Are you willing to sacrifice family and career time pursuing your pool-playing goals?

These are not skills or abilities, they are regimens and attitudes that improve them. The last one is simply common sense. May we all have the wisdom to choose wisely. When I see young people obsessed with the game, I do not see a bright future.
 
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Buzzard II

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
At 70 I look back and know I was and still am a much better motorcycle rider than a pool player. Until I blew out my knee a much better skier too. Now with arthritis in my thumbs and wrists I lament the inability to form a closed bridge. Beyond that, the limits of my play is only restricted due to my own priorities to other sports.

But as I age I spend more time at the table. This seems to be the only thing I'm getting better at. Oh, except napping, I could be a contender at that.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The answer is simple. Because it's folly.

Just look at what you do now and what you don't do.

- Do you practice for the same length of time and intensity as you did when you were younger?

- Do you have the burning desire to prove yourself, display your skills and beat your opponents, to the extreme where it can be labeled an obsession?

- Do you have a structured, daily regimen to work on your skills, learn new ones, play games that advance your skills and address your weaknesses?

- Do you come to the table rested, with energy, focus and passion?

- Do you have the confidence that you are 100% ready for your match?

- Are you willing to sacrifice family and career time pursuing your pool-playing goals?

These are not skills or abilities, they are regimens and attitudes that improve them. The last one is simply common sense. May we all have the wisdom to choose wisely. When I see young people obsessed with the game, I do not see a bright future.
Yes, I can check off all the boxes with the exception of the last one. The reality is that it’s just too late at this point in my life.
 

Taxi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What’s the Most Frustrating Aspect of Being an Aging Pool Player?

That's easy. Playing in one of those weekend tournaments and having your last match on Saturday end after midnight, then having to drive home and be back at 11:00 the next morning if you made it to the second day. At 75 I can play for long stretches beginning in the afternoon and well into the evening, but having to start all over again the next morning is too much for me to sweat.
 

misterpoole

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My game going downhill way faster than my fargo rating.
I also dont play 2 day tournaments anymore
Breaking power is not what it should be so i like 1 pocket more and more
 
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AkGuy

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Lighten up, have fun!

I am 69 and still enjoy the game. Most of my playing is at home on my old 9' Rebco.

I was never an "A" player and never will be. Don't have to be to have fun. Pool hall closed years ago and only pool is at local dives on really neglected tables.

If you move to a hick Alaskan town you can be about the best player around! LOL

The hardest part for me is keeping a competitive edge, just can't maintain it for hour after hour like I used to. So not having the mental focus makes consistency hard.

I am more concerned with my diminishing firearms skills, especially with the hand gun. They are different then rifles and require lots of trigger time. Here in Alaska it is the middle of winter and the gun range is frozen!

The pool table is warm and cozy and I will visit it later this evening. Father Time spares no one, embrace it and just have fun and relish it when you have a good day and beat one of the local hot shots!
 

deanoc

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i recently ran 56 balls of 14:1 this is possibly my all time high

my average has never been any where near 15

I do have 5 inch pockets so that helps,but
5inch was standard when I was a kid

I have improved my game with the Jackpot cue

All of you senior citizens might want to buy a Jackpot Sr
the cue that improved Deans high run

Present your AARP card for an extra discount

Beeing old sdoesn't mean you can not hit the Jackpot
 
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dogginda9

I need a vacation.
Silver Member
For me it is 2-fold.
Non essential tremors and arthritis in my bridge hand thumb. Not being able to make a comfortable closed bridge without shooting pain and shaking like a leaf make pool a real treat sometimes.😣 I can still get it done sometimes but other times it`s just out of my control.
I've come to terms with it and for the most part I'm ok about it.
My best days are behind me and now I just play because I love the game.
 

UGOTDA7

Ban pending.....
Silver Member
- Back / neck issues
- Eyesight not as good
- Losing your edge / killer instinct...it just doesn't matter like it used to
- Frustration with knowing how to do it...but at times not being able to execute
- Inability to focus over time...such as long gambling match ups / deep into tournaments
 

MitchAlsup

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
So I pose this question, what is more depressing and frustrating for an aging pool player who loves the game and hates seeing it dying out?

a) most distressing:: simply being that old
b) somewhat distressing:: game is withering from public
c) most frustrating:: losing ability to see the shot
d) somewhat frustrating:: being able to make shot and position
 

Bavafongoul

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Here is the stark naked truth.......

The Older I Get, The Better I Was......Sure, I used to hit that Spaulding more than two sewers.
Well, maybe not, but the best at box ball, stoop ball, poison ball & In Kings, it was my throne.

The most frustrating part is knowing as much as I do now as a pool player, and understanding
proper table mapping (position). My knowledge is extraordinary but my skills are diminishing
with the unavoidable progression of time. I can’t maintain excellent play for long periods. My
bum knee and broken right shoulder start hurting too much and I start to fade. Longest I can
play is 2-3 hrs but only an hr. isn’t uncommon. The mind says play on but the body says Nope.

When you are physically not able to play the game you love so much every day and how long
you get to play is limited due to ailments, you learn to appreciate your time on the table quickly.


Folks remember this, even playing bad pool on junky tables is better than not playing....Just Enjoy Every Minute.
 

ChrisinNC

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Reading some of the responses to this self pity thread I’m responsible for starting is beginning to make me feel a little guilty and a little better about my condition at 63, compared to some others here. I’m going to try to keep that in mind tonight when I shoot some!
 
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Black-Balled

He Rides the Skies
Silver Member
For me, it is motivation...lack of.

Probably a direct result of a family and its subsequent obligations.

Wouldn't have it any other way. What matters? Family or a good runout?
 

ceebee

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Can You become a Better Player at an older age?

The answer is simple. Because it's folly.

Just look at what you do now and what you don't do.

- Do you practice for the same length of time and intensity as you did when you were younger?

- Do you have the burning desire to prove yourself, display your skills and beat your opponents, to the extreme where it can be labeled an obsession?

- Do you have a structured, daily regimen to work on your skills, learn new ones, play games that advance your skills and address your weaknesses?

- Do you come to the table rested, with energy, focus and passion?

- Do you have the confidence that you are 100% ready for your match?

- Are you willing to sacrifice family and career time pursuing your pool-playing goals?

These are not skills or abilities, they are regimens and attitudes that improve them. The last one is simply common sense. May we all have the wisdom to choose wisely. When I see young people obsessed with the game, I do not see a bright future.

Mr Tate, Your post is Spot On... As a rule, the older guys are settled into their routines, but so are the younger ones. Practice isn't the name of the game, in America's Pool Halls. Never has been, probably never will be. How many can put a dime on the table, shoot a ball in the Hole, go two rails & leave the Cue Ball within 6 inches of the dime..? Do you know your Rails...? Do you know your rails off a Carom Shot...? Do you use a Coach to keep your skills tuned up, Do you practice for 2 weeks before a Big Tournament. Do you have a good Break Shot in most games..? Do you need newer Glasses. Are you fit to walk 4 miles before & after lunch, everyday. If you can't walk all afternoon, can't see the back wall very clear & don't have some knowledge about the game, Why would you worry about running 3 balls?
 
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