Who was the one pool player that you learned the most from watching them play?

Lock N Load

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Going way off the radar with this one and say Richie Richeson. I learn something from him almost everytime I watch him play and definitely each time we play. Sometimes shots, sometimes attitude, demeanor, or will to win but I learn something regardless.

Hello Mike,
He does play good pool. I watched him play night before last in Buffalo Billiards. He gave a guy the 7 and out, and beat him like a drum. Him and all of the other out of town players went to the big tournament in Lafayette, Louisiana going on this weekend. Him and Benny Conway Jr were traveling together. Thanks for your input Mike.
Many Regards,
Lock N Load.
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
I completely agree Calired. Some people on this forum do have that need. If some can't show the "pool world" just who they are and how "connected" they are, then the day just isn't worth waking up to. Very pathetic. This is why I seldom post. I do a lot of private messaging and communicate with some old cronies and acquantances.

Some must always let others know that they are such good friends with some pro or another or that they just talked to some pro or had lunch with some pro or just talked on the phone with some pro. This is very sad. Sounds like they don't get out of the house much.

This is all proof of how obviously low their self esteem is that they have to resort to such pathetic crap for a little jolt in their lives.

Methinks I'm gonna like this guy!!!

Maniac
 

asiasdad

Banned
The pool player where I learned the most was not actually in watching
him play, although even in his aged state was still exceptional, it was
in the wisdom he shared as I gave him rides home from Russian Daves
room in the Seattle area.

He called me "Dangerous" as he was trying to teach me advanced
one pocket, and I'd take the damnedest flyers, and get away with them.

I will never forget the look in his eyes when when he told me this truth:

He said, "Dangerous, pool was once my passion, then it became my job,
and now it is my sentence"

This players name is Bill Cress.

Bill_Cress.jpg
 

jay helfert

Shoot Pool, not people
Gold Member
Silver Member
Ronnie Allen without question, the most uniquely talented One Pocket player I ever saw. Ronnie could win from anywhere on the table, even when he was hooked behind a ball! I saw him three rail kick balls into his hole and run out from no where! :eek:
 

Lock N Load

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ronnie Allen without question, the most uniquely talented One Pocket player I ever saw. Ronnie could win from anywhere on the table, even when he was hooked behind a ball! I saw him three rail kick balls into his hole and run out from no where! :eek:

Hello Jay,
I trust that you and your family are doing well. I am glad to have your input into this thread. You are the man when it comes to knowing about pool and pool players all over the world. Your Dvd and books are good too!
And Ronnie could play real good for sure.
Many Regards,
Lock N Load.
 

the kidd

VOTE ONE TIME
Silver Member
Joe Procida

Joe Procida...We played a few dozen times in the 60's in Mcgerrs,
 
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CJ Wiley

ESPN WORLD OPEN CHAMPION
Gold Member
Silver Member
.building suspense would work much better

Dear CJ--

What I learned from the video of Steve Davis and Ronnie O'Sullivan was not to play any licorice-haired Irishmen snooker!

One of the things I regret about most pool videos is that very often one is watching disembodied wrists and hands. I wonder if on easier shots the camera might not be pulled back sometimes in order to offer a fuller view of the stance of the player and his pre-shot routine.

These things seem important to me, and that's how they project golf and tennis as well. Of course I have a totally different idea of how the pool commentary would be better.

Trying to predict the shots isn't the best way to go about it....imho....building suspense would work much better, and they need to learn how to do this like they do in poker.

Viewers need to FEEL the pressure and suspense and how it's effecting the players pre shot routine and even their follow through....you ever hear a commentator talk about these things? The answer is "yes", but not stratigically and systematically. 'The Game is the Teacher'
 

Lock N Load

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
These things seem important to me, and that's how they project golf and tennis as well. Of course I have a totally different idea of how the pool commentary would be better.

Trying to predict the shots isn't the best way to go about it....imho....building suspense would work much better, and they need to learn how to do this like they do in poker.

Viewers need to FEEL the pressure and suspense and how it's effecting the players pre shot routine and even their follow through....you ever hear a commentator talk about these things? The answer is "yes", but not stratigically and systematically. 'The Game is the Teacher'

Hey CJ,
I got my eyes on you! You are the Man!
Many Regards,
Lock N Load.
 

chefjeff

No sides, only players
Silver Member
I was lucky enough and honored to see Irving Crane practice and to be coached by him. I have seen other great players but non in his league even remotely. He was one of a kind and he was also my friend. Each time I hold a cue and line up a shot, I remember his voice and know what he would say.... May he rest in peace and my many thanks!

I just found this thread and it seems that Post #3 here trumps anything that will follow.

(Don McCoy is who I watched.)

Jeff Livingston
 

Yoda4962

North Texas
Silver Member
Dick Lane in Dallas

In the late 70's, he and I practiced straight pool all night long, 3 or 4 times a week. I racked so many times my hands would bleed !!!! lol

He put so many 200 and 300's on me that I lost my will to play anymore, and I did retire for many years . Sure miss that monster !!!
 

Lock N Load

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In the late 70's, he and I practiced straight pool all night long, 3 or 4 times a week. I racked so many times my hands would bleed !!!! lol

He put so many 200 and 300's on me that I lost my will to play anymore, and I did retire for many years . Sure miss that monster !!!

He sounds like a real monster!
Many Regards,
Lock N load.
 

canwin

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
These things seem important to me, and that's how they project golf and tennis as well. Of course I have a totally different idea of how the pool commentary would be better.

Trying to predict the shots isn't the best way to go about it....imho....building suspense would work much better, and they need to learn how to do this like they do in poker.

Viewers need to FEEL the pressure and suspense and how it's effecting the players pre shot routine and even their follow through....you ever hear a commentator talk about these things? The answer is "yes", but not stratigically and systematically. 'The Game is the Teacher'

CJ,
imo, to put 2 shot rollout back in the equation, you'd see/feel more of what you're trying to describe. Picking up the qball and placing it wherever you want as a reward compared with having to make a shot would psychologically impact those who rely on the nonshot the most to keep them in the game..especially when it's crunch time. I think that would get you to the feeling you want to portray. You could be the start of that brand of the game. I know that's whats kept me from competing. Can't wait for that day..
Canwin
 
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canwin

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ronnie Allen without question, the most uniquely talented One Pocket player I ever saw. Ronnie could win from anywhere on the table, even when he was hooked behind a ball! I saw him three rail kick balls into his hole and run out from no where! :eek:

I saw Ronnie Allen get beat in Albuquerque by a man named Freddie Garcia playing 1 pocket.
There's people you've never heard of. .
 

Bigdogbret

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When I first started playing back in 1980 it was Nick Varner. I could not get enough of watching the way he stroke3d the ball, played position and his attitude at the table. He showed so much heart!
The last 5-6 years, Shane Van Boening. I have studied his break (best on the planet) the way he carries himself at the table, his stroke, he also has a massive heart!
Now I ask myself, Why don't I play better?!?!
 

Lock N Load

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
When I first started playing back in 1980 it was Nick Varner. I could not get enough of watching the way he stroke3d the ball, played position and his attitude at the table. He showed so much heart!
The last 5-6 years, Shane Van Boening. I have studied his break (best on the planet) the way he carries himself at the table, his stroke, he also has a massive heart!
Now I ask myself, Why don't I play better?!?!

Nick sure can play pool well. I like him and he is a nice guy.
He signed my cue, their are only 3 names of pool players on my cue.
Many Regards,
Lock N load.
 

CJ Wiley

ESPN WORLD OPEN CHAMPION
Gold Member
Silver Member
I think it would be a GREAT idea to bring back these "golden" rules.

CJ,
imo, to put 2 shot rollout back in the equation, you'd see/feel more of what you're trying to describe. Picking up the qball and placing it wherever you want as a reward compared with having to make a shot would psychologically impact those who rely on the nonshot the most to keep them in the game..especially when it's crunch time. I think that would get you to the feeling you want to portray. You could be the start of that brand of the game. I know that's whats kept me from competing. Can't wait for that day..
Canwin

Yes, 2 shot rollout seperates the "cream of the crop" from the rest in a very short amount of time. Anytime people start talking bad about 9 Ball or 10 Ball don't realize its like dogging hamburger helper compared to Filet Mignon or the music complexity of Mozart (roll out) compared to some local Hip Hop band (one foul).

The way the rotation games are played today is a very "watered down". This doesn't mean that many of the same top players wouldn't be winning tournaments, it just means it would be more of a challenge. You would see the game in it's purest form and the skill level would be very apparent.

I watched an old video of St. Louie Louie last night and they were shooting spot shots when they scratched on the break. You know the last time I saw someone shoot a spot shot? It used to be a common part of the game. I think it would be a GREAT idea to bring back these "golden" rules.
 

8ballEinstein

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I saw Ronnie Allen get beat in Albuquerque by a man named Freddie Garcia playing 1 pocket.
There's people you've never heard of. .

:wink: This was likely a stall tactic by Ronnie. It was not unusual for him to cross the country and book a lot of losers, then on the return trip take off everyone he played earlier - except for a lot more money. Ronnie was a true hustler of the first degree.
 

Rico

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Lessons

DON MCcaughey was like watching Buddy their position play made you sick . LOUIE ROBERTS didnt care he was the ultimate shot maker. I also was fortunate enough to see IRVING CRANE play. I personally believe if he had SHANES OR Wade Cranes break he would have been unbeatable. And Dallas West is the one i think showed me the most . His all around ability in 9 ball straight pool one pocket 3 cushon his tenacity second to none.:cool:
 

Lock N Load

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
DON MCcaughey was like watching Buddy their position play made you sick . LOUIE ROBERTS didnt care he was the ultimate shot maker. I also was fortunate enough to see IRVING CRANE play. I personally believe if he had SHANES OR Wade Cranes break he would have been unbeatable. And Dallas West is the one i think showed me the most . His all around ability in 9 ball straight pool one pocket 3 cushon his tenacity second to none.:cool:

You watched a lot of good pool players. I bet you learned a lot of good shots, and had a lot of improvement in your game. Thanks for your input.
Many Regards,
Lock N Load.
 
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