Cue prep for sales and shipping

classiccues

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I'll start this thread with some basic cue information and we'll see where this thread goes.

The first picture is of the basic tools required for describing a cue and taking measurements. I use a digital postal scale, a digital caliper (sorry) and a seamstress tape, or sewing tape.

JV
 

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classiccues

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Cue weighing

I position the cue on the scale so it doesn't roll. Make sure the scale is tared correctly. I like to do the butt and the shafts on their own. Remember to remove the joint caps.

JV
 

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classiccues

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Shaft diameters

In all dimensions this is probably number one or two in importance when describing your cue. Many times people guess this and it can make or break a sale. I use a digital caliper and take my measurement from the ferrule. Digital calipers are inespensive and can be purchased at Harbor freight.

If you don't have a caliper, you could use a tip guage, and eyeball it, but you will still be guessing.

JV
 

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classiccues

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Length

I like the flex tape because it doesn't mark or have the possibility to damage the cue if you slip like a metal tape can. Plus they are easy to roll up and take up little space in my case.

The measurement for the butts start at the face of the joint and go to the end of the cue (butt cap), not the bumper. Shafts should be from the end of ferrule to the joint facing of the shaft. On a piloted shaft exclude the nub, or boss at the end of the shaft.

I like to burn an inch when I measure, just don't forget to adjust.

JV
 

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saint1

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Very nice Post! This is a major area for me as I rarely get a cue that weighs and measures what the cue is listed for. I think many times the sellers guess. Recently I bought a high dollar cue and ask several times this info. The seller said he would have a cue repair guy check, he came back with corrections on the weight. I bought cue and it was off by 1/2 oz and both shafts by .25mm. Thats a lot. Don't mean to be rude. but sliding caliper, not micrometer. The scale would have "no" tare and shaft should be measured on wood just below ferrule. Good listing.
 

ToomnyQs

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Mic

This is a great thread..I just bought a new Digital Caliper at Hardor Freight for $15 so there is really no reason not to have one..I also measure my shafts at the base of ferrule..Not on the wood..Just my personal preference I guess..
 
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classiccues

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Wrapping

I like shipping a cue wrapped this way because it has never failed me. Some 1000 cues later, I still have had no issues.

I take the cue and a wide piece of bubble wrap, small bubbles. Start rolling the butt till its got 2 winds of wrap. Then I introduce the first shaft reverse of the taper along the butt, wrap it twice. The last shaft is then wrapped into that bundle and then tapped. I will then add two wrappings of bubble wrap over that to ensure a nice tightly protected bundle.

You can use cue sleeves, then bundle them, and wrap it. I like bubble wrap the best however.

As far as a tube, you can use the triangluar tubes from USPS and Fedex or an inexpensive 4" plastic tube with caps from Home Depot. These are basically indestructible and on a big cue, its the way I like to ship them. (See update on shipping packaging) towards end of thread.

JV
 

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JAlan

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Very good advice and post sir!!

I will add to keep a close eye on the USPS triangle tubes. Their quality seems to go lower and lower with each batch I get. I wish they would be as heavy as the FedEX or UPS supplied tubes!
 

Kot_Bigemot

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Very good advice and post sir!!

I will add to keep a close eye on the USPS triangle tubes. Their quality seems to go lower and lower with each batch I get. I wish they would be as heavy as the FedEX or UPS supplied tubes!

I do not use JUST those tubes. I always get a hard round tube at Staples, pack the cue with lots of bubble wrap and then put the tube in that triangular box by USPS. Perhaps it is few $$$ more but, much safer in my opinion.
 

Kot_Bigemot

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I like shipping a cue wrapped this way because it has never failed me. Some 1000 cues later, I still have had no issues.

I take the cue and a wide piece of bubble wrap, small bubbles. Start rolling the butt till its got 2 winds of wrap. Then I introduce the first shaft reverse of the taper along the butt, wrap it twice. The last shaft is then wrapped into that bundle and then tapped. I will then add two wrappings of bubble wrap over that to ensure a nice tightly protected bundle.

You can use cue sleeves, then bundle them, and wrap it. I like bubble wrap the best however.

As far as a tube, you can use the triangluar tubes from USPS and Fedex or an inexpensive 4" plastic tube with caps from Home Depot. These are basically indestructible and on a big cue, its the way I like to ship them.

JV

Great way of doing it. I do it a bit different. I wrap each shaft and butt individually and then use one large piece of wrap to wrap them all together.
But yeah, great threat. It should be made a sticky. For all members to see.
 

classiccues

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I like the hard polyethylene pipe but I am always leary that a round tube, rolls. Rolls off the table, off the belt, off the truck. Rolls out of site, period.

You can also use a carpet tube and as it has been stated, to put the tube in another box. You can use 4 x 4 cardboard boxes found at many shipping stores.

JV
 

justabrake

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I like shipping a cue wrapped this way because it has never failed me. Some 1000 cues later, I still have had no issues.

I take the cue and a wide piece of bubble wrap, small bubbles. Start rolling the butt till its got 2 winds of wrap. Then I introduce the first shaft reverse of the taper along the butt, wrap it twice. The last shaft is then wrapped into that bundle and then tapped. I will then add two wrappings of bubble wrap over that to ensure a nice tightly protected bundle.

You can use cue sleeves, then bundle them, and wrap it. I like bubble wrap the best however.

As far as a tube, you can use the triangluar tubes from USPS and Fedex or an inexpensive 4" plastic tube with caps from Home Depot. These are basically indestructible and on a big cue, its the way I like to ship them.

JV

Me I go to an art or picture framing store give them a few bucks and I get heavy duty tubs with ends

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_7GGzRYM7g&feature=plcp

One way to check straightness. You are looking for deviation or bounce at the shaft tip.

JV

That video only shows at that cues straightness at that point where it's leaning on the rail where it's straight and the tip doesn't move

Try going and laying the cue across the two rails and roll with the tip hanging over the table and watch the TIP and the JOINT

Then why don't we break the cue down and roll seprately looking for light under the cue for unevenness or looking on top of the cue and watching the pin for a wobble

Then roll each shaft looking for a wobble or light coming from underneath

Then connect the cue and roll that on different places on the table then go to another table and do the same because you might get different results from one table to another

Adding ! And Don't forget to make sure the face of the joint is even
 
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kvinbrwr

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As a seller you want to accurately describe the item you are selling. You want to try to look at the item you are selling by anticipating your buyer's eye, and then tell him what you can see. No sense in trying to decide what you can get away with, because it will get noticed. Be picky in your description and you will avoid problems with you buyer later.

As a seller, you want to accurately describe your guarantee. If you don't mention it and you "get away with it" because the buyer doesn't ask, you really are now operating under whatever guarantee the buyer ASSUMED you to give. Everybody is far better off knowing what they are getting into up front.

Kevin
 

Kot_Bigemot

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+1. Could not agree more.
Leave no room for assumptions. Everything must be as clear as possible.
 

ibuycues

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JV,

You have provided some stellar advice on how to package and ship a cue, protected and safe. Your words are clear and simple, the pictures are worth a thousand words, and the advice is invaluable.

I personally ship cues exactly as you have described, buying my tubes in 10 foot sections at Home Depot where they will cut them to the exact lengths you wish for no charge. End caps are a few pennies, and you can breathe easily when the cue is shipped. Protected against everything except loss.

Great post, I would suggest that the next 100 people who read this post you give you a green rep and offer you thanks! You have given your time to offer your suggestions and it will without a doubt help others in the future.

Will Prout
 

ibuycues

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Great Post

As a seller you want to accurately describe the item you are selling. You want to try to look at the item you are selling by anticipating your buyer's eye, and then tell him what you can see. No sense in trying to decide what you can get away with, because it will get noticed. Be picky in your description and you will avoid problems with you buyer later.

As a seller, you want to accurately describe your guarantee. If you don't mention it and you "get away with it" because the buyer doesn't ask, you really are now operating under whatever guarantee the buyer ASSUMED you to give. Everybody is far better off knowing what they are getting into up front.

Kevin

Another great post coming from a Master Seller who walks the walk!

Thanks! Green rep your way!

Will Prout
 

classiccues

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One other thing that I do that helps take up space, on the ends of the cue wrap it with extra bubble wrap and tape. It will help prevent the cue from bouncing around in the tube. In fact you could build up the ends so that the cue is suspended from the edges of the tube / box. Anyone that has gotten a package that has had a hole in the side knows that you open the box with your eyes closed.

JV
 

rigmaster

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Sliding Caliper?

Very nice Post! This is a major area for me as I rarely get a cue that weighs and measures what the cue is listed for. I think many times the sellers guess. Recently I bought a high dollar cue and ask several times this info. The seller said he would have a cue repair guy check, he came back with corrections on the weight. I bought cue and it was off by 1/2 oz and both shafts by .25mm. Thats a lot. Don't mean to be rude. but sliding caliper, not micrometer. The scale would have "no" tare and shaft should be measured on wood just below ferrule. Good listing.

I have never heard of the term SLIDING CALIPER I think the correct term might be Veneer Caliper, not to be rude either but if you are going to correct someone you should use the correct term! Mine are STARRETT. As for the Shaft measurement it is from the top of ferrule where the tip is applied not the wood below the ferrule ,this type of measurement would have you listing the shaft 1" to 1 1/4" shorter than it actually is! Just sayin....
 

cueaddicts

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Joe,

This is all great info for people to see, especially folks just getting into cues.

Here's one thing I've learned. On the ends of the triangular tube box, it's a good idea to tape over the edges well and also wrap around the ends of the box a few extra times with tape. On two occasions, I've had cues sent to me where a box end was opened a little or torn out where the ends fold and/or have the flap where it closes....like it was caught in a machine or something. Having the box ends really tight and securely taped will help avoid problems, not to mention keeping everything inside nice and cozy, & less susceptible to the elements.

Sean

PS....Yes, the quality of the USPS shipping tubes/boxes have gotten pretty lousy, so the best way to go is with a light pvc or cardoard tube inside.
 
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