"Filipono" closed bridges vs standard closed bridges

Jimbojim

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have always wondered if you guys find any advantages to using the "Filipino" closed bridge versus the standard loop closed bridge.

- Filipino bridge being having the index finger in a triangle shape ON the middle finger

- Standard closed bridge being having the index finger round and meeting the thumb.

I can do both but I find that using the Filipino bridge makes for a cue not as level as the standard bridge because the cue has to rest higher on the middle finger but still many people use it.

Is it really more stable? Any other advantages I'm not familiar with?

(I put Filipino in brackets because I'm not entirely sure if that bridge first originated from the Philippines but it sure seems that a lot of players from over there use it)
 

HawaiianEye

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I have always wondered if you guys find any advantages to using the "Filipino" closed bridge versus the standard loop closed bridge.

- Filipino bridge being having the index finger in a triangle shape ON the middle finger

- Standard closed bridge being having the index finger round and meeting the thumb.

I can do both but I find that using the Filipino bridge makes for a cue not as level as the standard bridge because the cue has to rest higher on the middle finger but still many people use it.

Is it really more stable? Any other advantages I'm not familiar with?

(I put Filipino in brackets because I'm not entirely sure if that bridge first originated from the Philippines but it sure seems that a lot of players from over there use it)

Who says that is the Filipino bridge?

I have used that bridge since I was kid and before I had ever saw a Filipino before. I started using that bridge after watching one of our pool hall's best players when I used to sit and watch him play.

Some of Mosconi's books show him using a similar bridge.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
My index fingers are too short for that concave loop. Too much friction. As for the increase in elevation, you just learn the dynamics. IOW you learn to produce pool with a steeper stroke. It's not the same as "textbook" but ultimately pool is pool.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
you use the right bridge for the shot. for most average shots it doesnt matter at all.
 

Maniac

2manyQ's
Silver Member
Who says that is the Filipino bridge?

I have used that bridge since I was kid and before I had ever saw a Filipino before.

Same thing with shooting behind the back. For some reason many people believe that is a Filipino thing. Hell, I was doing that back in the sixties before I knew what a Filipino was....and I'm pretty sure I wasn't the first person in America to do it. :thumbup:

Maniac
 

one stroke

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Same thing with shooting behind the back. For some reason many people believe that is a Filipino thing. Hell, I was doing that back in the sixties before I knew what a Filipino was....and I'm pretty sure I wasn't the first person in America to do it. :thumbup:

Maniac

They don't shoot exclusively closed bridge they shoot a lot of open bridge , In fact I'm fascinated by Busty who draws his cue past the v many times on shots he's got a callus in the web from doing that for decades , Mika actually has the tightest close bridge I've seen it's like a death grip on the shaft, i have found and I'm no pro but if your dialing up a big shot with low I find it to be my preferred bridge


1
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Same thing with shooting behind the back. ... Hell, I was doing that back in the sixties before I knew what a Filipino was....and I'm pretty sure I wasn't the first person in America to do it. :thumbup:
...
I'm pretty sure Irving Crane was shooting behind his back in the 1920s. And then there was Leon Yonders....

CropperCapture[525].png

But around here the main behind-the-back player other than Leon was in fact Filipino Gene (Gene Ventura).

(The above Ripley's item is from Robert Byrne's "Treasury of Trick Shots".)
 
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Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
And Johnny Archer is among the US players who use what I call the "reverse flexed" closed bridge. I think it can be as snug as the Mosconi closed bridge and may have less bind in humid conditions.
 

WildWing

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
By the OP's description, it seems that Steve Mizerak had a modified Filipino bridge as well. The index finger had a definite triangle shape, no loop. However, modified, because he waved the ring finger in the air when he shot, a good amount of the time. I always thought that looked strange. But I think it was sort of a trigger for him, maybe a bit of tension release to let him know to stroke the cue ball.

By the way, many, many players use that bridge.

All the best,
WW
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Always been a fan of the "Siamese nipple-twister universal billiard bridge" myself. ;) Seriously? Never heard this before.
 

Jimbojim

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Who says that is the Filipino bridge?

I have used that bridge since I was kid and before I had ever saw a Filipino before. I started using that bridge after watching one of our pool hall's best players when I used to sit and watch him play.

Some of Mosconi's books show him using a similar bridge.

Yeah I have no idea if that'a a Filipino bridge or not, all I know is that Efren was the first I saw use and many others from the Philippines
 

Buster8001

Did you say shrubberies?
Silver Member
...
(I put Filipino in brackets because I'm not entirely sure if that bridge first originated from the Philippines but it sure seems that a lot of players from over there use it)

The above from his unedited post.

Who says that is the Filipino bridge?
...

Do you contribute anything of value, or just "bust" on people threads?
See what I did there? "Bust", as in "Buster be bust'n" as you like to say. :rolleyes:
 

Buster8001

Did you say shrubberies?
Silver Member
I use the flexed closed bridge, even though my hands are thick and my fingers are short. lol. I just feel much more grounded with that pressure.
BaltPlayoffs1.jpg
 

Jimbojim

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

Thank you for the pictures!

I have always used the bridge Earl uses in that picture but I have on occasion used one like Shane and it somehow felt like I could get more action with less effort but I noticed my cue wasn't as level with that bridge for draw shots. Since all bars are closed and I don't have a table at home, now seems like a good time to try to incorporate something new if it's worth it given that my tournament season is cancelled.
 

Marky Mark

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The only thing I can say about the loop closed bridge is that it is UGLY! ������
 

justadub

Rattling corners nightly
Silver Member
I had heard that referred to as a "Phillipino bridge" at one point, as well... not sure why, other than to differentiate it somewhat, I suppose.

I can't get the hang of using it tho.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
https://youtu.be/8DYDMMw5TtE?t=41

Efren told us one time, when he gets nervous he rests his palm down to the felt.
When he's feeling loose and confident his bridge is more upright and he doesn't rest the heel of his palm on the felt.

I recall an old pic of The Miz with the same bridge.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ray Martin taught me that tighter bridge in the early 80s. I used it for awhile but found that pressing on my third finger like that actually started to hurt my finger. I switched to the looser California loop which is where you can see air in the loop and i never looked back. I don't think you need a death grip bridge to keep the cue on line.
 
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