Grip question

How many fingers do you use on your grip hand?

  • Index finger/thumb

    Votes: 2 4.5%
  • Two fingers/thumb

    Votes: 8 18.2%
  • Three fingers/thumb

    Votes: 15 34.1%
  • All four and thumb

    Votes: 19 43.2%

  • Total voters
    44

tuffstuff07

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In a funk and trying to get comfortable with a grip and was wondering how many fingers you hold the cue with?

Rereading through some material I have it states that the cue is supposed to rest in the first two fingers and craddled in place by the thumb but I have also read that all 4 fingers and the thumb should be used to craddle the cue.

Wanted to see what everyone's opinion was.
 

RiverCity

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
All 4 fingers on the cue, but nothing is gripping the cue. It lays on the fingers, and as you can see, theres quite a bit of light visible ie its loose.
 

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S.Vaskovskyi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In a funk and trying to get comfortable with a grip and was wondering how many fingers you hold the cue with?

Rereading through some material I have it states that the cue is supposed to rest in the first two fingers and craddled in place by the thumb but I have also read that all 4 fingers and the thumb should be used to craddle the cue.

Wanted to see what everyone's opinion was.
You could also think if there are any changes/differences in your grip (which fingers touch the cue or how the cue lays on the fingers) at these particular moments of the stroking motion:
- the end of backswing
- at the moment of the cue tip contacting the CB
- at the end of the follow through.
One of the most important moments of the stroke is when the cue tip hits the CB. That period of time is such short making it very likely impossible to control by your consciousness and that is mostly what defines a pure stroke one has when the others don't. I guess that is also one of the reasons there are various grips working well for different people and for certain shots...
You can control some things on a certain phases of your stroke paying close attention to certain things which may help and lead to a cleaner and smoother stroke but it is much easier to be said than done. At least that is my experience on the topic.
 
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Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
It doesn't matter how you hold on to the cuestick. What matters is not grabbing the cue (any more than is necessary to keep the cue from flying out of your hand), on the forward stroke. Have a perfect transition from backwards to forwards, and let the cue do the work. This is true even on the break.

Scott Lee
Director, SPF National Pool School Tour

In a funk and trying to get comfortable with a grip and was wondering how many fingers you hold the cue with?

Rereading through some material I have it states that the cue is supposed to rest in the first two fingers and craddled in place by the thumb but I have also read that all 4 fingers and the thumb should be used to craddle the cue.

Wanted to see what everyone's opinion was.
 

evergruven

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I hold my cue like I'm holding a baby bird- safely, but gently
and then I let that baby bird spread its wings
and fly
 

Island Drive

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
In a funk and trying to get comfortable with a grip and was wondering how many fingers you hold the cue with?

Rereading through some material I have it states that the cue is supposed to rest in the first two fingers and craddled in place by the thumb but I have also read that all 4 fingers and the thumb should be used to craddle the cue.

Wanted to see what everyone's opinion was.

Do what I did years ago....I knew tho I had a flaw and I thought doing this, would best answer my question. I watched the grip of every player at the event (Reds Houston 82?) for two days.... and before I left I changed my grip, played a guy one set to test it, then went back to CO. Three months later, best change of all I ever did to my game.
 

gordml

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member

I too was impressed with Barry Stark.
But he teaches snooker, where there is more emphasis on keeping the cue super straight. Thats why he teaches to cradle the cue into the fleshy part of the hand between thumb and index finger.
Pool coaches (Mark Wilson for example) say there should be lots of air between the fleshy part of the hand and cue.
The gap allows you to throw the cue.
Most extreme example of this style is Bustamente. Few players could grip it that loose.
So theres two contradicting styles. Hope that doeasnt make it too confusing.:confused:
Gotta go whats best for you.
Try to make a long stop shot into the corner pocket 10 times in a row. Which ever grip works for this best is your grip
 

alstl

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I never think about how I grip the cue. It's just kind of automatic.
 

jrctherake

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Grip is like bridge lengths, bridge height or open or closed etc...etc, use whatever grip is needed at the time.

Everyone thinks they use the same grip all the time but, they don't. Just like they don't use the same bridge length and height everytime.

The better the player, the less they are aware of what their doing it "while" they are doing it.

Think muscle memory coupled with experience and logic.

Jeff
 

PoolBoy1

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
ya just knew when the internet arrived so did dreaded over analyzing. New players should develop a natural to them methodology that is comfortable and works. Then take pieces of info to incorporate into their stance, grip, sighting. Way many players would kick butts from the 60's on of todays out of a can player. LOL.
 
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