Having problems separating joint protectors after finishing

cammel8

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Ok first off i don't have sanding mandrels. I know that is one option however, I have made probably 20 or 30 sets without issue until now. Im using a super glue finish. I have tried leaving them on my drive pins and then screwing them together after finishing. I have tried leaving them together then cutting apart after finish is done. I tried finishing them separately unused drive pins smaller than the outside diameter, then facing them off. No matter what i do, I can't seem to stop the finish from pealing away from the wood at the joint. Any ideas short of sanding mandrels? Unless some has a set for sale for cheap. This will be my fourth time finishing them. Two of the first three attempts are in the pictures
 

Attachments

  • 2015-09-27 13.34.36.jpg
    2015-09-27 13.34.36.jpg
    98.9 KB · Views: 662
  • 2015-09-27 13.34.44.jpg
    2015-09-27 13.34.44.jpg
    94.3 KB · Views: 595

cammel8

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
You are simply burning thru the finish on the edges. A nice straight sanding block will stop most of your problem. I would say you are sanding with your hands? If so you are just rolling over the edges burning thru.

No. It happen when i either try to cut it apart, or face it off.
 

cammel8

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Also helps to wear latex gloves to stop the transfer of skin oils onto the wood before clearing. Oil from your fingers can cause adhesion problems.

I usually clean it real well with alcohol before i start the finish. And it has never done this before.
 

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Do you have anything with silicone in the shop ?
If you do, get rid of it .
Might wanna use acetone to clean that wood after you strip the finish again.
The less CA you use, the better .
I suggest coating that with West 207 first .
At least two coats.
 

Nuts4Tascarellas

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
correct

Royse nailed it. I was having the same problem. Then a friend (experienced cuemaker) gave me the same advice. Additionally, don't leave those 2 parts screwed together when you finish. Do them as singles. Overlap the finish beyond the edge on the side that will be faced off. Good luck.
 

BHQ

we'll miss you
Silver Member
Ok first off i don't have sanding mandrels. I know that is one option however, I have made probably 20 or 30 sets without issue until now. Im using a super glue finish. I have tried leaving them on my drive pins and then screwing them together after finishing. I have tried leaving them together then cutting apart after finish is done. I tried finishing them separately unused drive pins smaller than the outside diameter, then facing them off. No matter what i do, I can't seem to stop the finish from pealing away from the wood at the joint. Any ideas short of sanding mandrels? Unless some has a set for sale for cheap. This will be my fourth time finishing them. Two of the first three attempts are in the pictures
i use my carbide mandrels,
but in the past have done them with delrin as my mandrel.
with just a touch of wax on face, in case a little ca seeps in,
they'll come loose without tearing the ca

 

cammel8

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Don't sand with anything finer than 220.

Royce

Really? I never would have thought of that. I have been sanding from 180 to 3000. But now that you mention it, it makes sense. But don't you see scratches at 220?
 

cammel8

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
i use my carbide mandrels,
but in the past have done them with delrin as my mandrel.
with just a touch of wax on face, in case a little ca seeps in,
they'll come loose without tearing the ca


OK please explain. Do you just use the delrin on the drive pin to cover it? Do you Make a complete mandrel out of delrin? I'm Guessing you don't sand instill you hit the delrin? Or do you? Do you have a pic of what your talking about so i might see what your saying? Sounds way cheaper than sanding mandrels until I can afford a set.
 

BHQ

we'll miss you
Silver Member
OK please explain. Do you just use the delrin on the drive pin to cover it? Do you Make a complete mandrel out of delrin? I'm Guessing you don't sand instill you hit the delrin? Or do you? Do you have a pic of what your talking about so i might see what your saying? Sounds way cheaper than sanding mandrels until I can afford a set.

made a female threaded 3/8x10 delrin mandrel ,
turned to my finish .840 size .

used for both male & female jps ( use short pc of 3/8x10 rod for making into male )
stayed off the delrin with sandpaper as much as possible
 
Last edited:

JoeyInCali

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Really? I never would have thought of that. I have been sanding from 180 to 3000. But now that you mention it, it makes sense. But don't you see scratches at 220?

He's talking about sanding the wood itself before apppying CA.
 

Paul Dayton

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Just cut some thin delrin washers and put them between the protectors when you finish them. Drill an appropriate hole on a dellrin rod and slice off the washers.
 

DanO

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
No mater what grain you are using, sand lengthwise with the grain to remove the scratches before stepping up a grit. Anything over 440 is overkill.
 

cammel8

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
He's talking about sanding the wood itself before apppying CA.

I'm aware of that. Like I said, I had been sanding the wood from 180 to 3000. But it makes sense to leave something to adhere to. My question was meant to be read "don't you see the scratches [under the finish]"
 

cammel8

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
made a female threaded 3/8x10 delrin mandrel ,
turned to my finish .840 size .

used for both male & female jps ( use short pc of 3/8x10 rod for making into male )
stayed off the delrin with sandpaper as much as possible

I understand now!
 

rhncue

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I'm aware of that. Like I said, I had been sanding the wood from 180 to 3000. But it makes sense to leave something to adhere to. My question was meant to be read "don't you see the scratches [under the finish]"

Sanding with the grain, as opposed to across it makes whatever sanding marks there are invisible. Sanding finer than 320 or so leaves the wood to smooth to hold the finish.
 
Top