LAYERED TIPS

Mustanglee

New member
I have been using Le pro tips for 40 years. Is there any advantage to
the expensive layered tips?

Thanks
After 40 years unless you don't like something like transfer of English or especially Draw, I would stick with what you're used to. I have tried many. Moorey are high maintenance. I tried Sniper and they require breaking in, I used Tiger Everest for many years but just found one I like better. The Predator Victory in medium. Great tip. Doesn't mushroom and you really get a great transfer of English with it.
 
Consistency. Because the way they are made they don't compress much like a solid tip. First time I put on a Moori tip I hated it and cut it off. Then I tried it again and gave it an honest chance.

At the time they were the best. There are so many different tips now I would not know what to recommend. The price is fake as far as I am concerned.

When Moori were first around you couldn't get them. Guys were paying $30.00 to $50.00 a tip to get one. This set a false market for layered tips. In reality I bought Moori tips from Sang Lee for $4.00 a tip. The after market created this mystic and price gauging and the price never came down.

This is just my opinion, maybe there is a reason they are so expensive but I don't see it.
I was a personal friend of Sang Lee and he always used Blue Diamond tips and sometimes Elk Master but he treated them before using to get consistency..
 

S.Vaskovskyi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Good news is there are quite a lot of quality tips out there to choose from. The thing is you have to try and see which one works the best for you. Once you found the tip you like for your game it's better stick with it focusing on much more important things in this game.
I've played mostly with layered tips I started to learn the game with a simple Triangle though. Once first Moori's appeared in my country I was curious to try it. After trying I liked them and stick with them for years till their quality went down. Then first Kamui appeared so I tried it and I hadn't found much of a difference.
With these tips the only drawback I experienced sometimes after a bad miscue usually on long power draws and due to my stroke being not accurate enough....so sometimes the result was a crack in some layers of the tip. Depending on the crack the tip could still be used but usually till the next miscue. So once it was there it meant you should change it. This happened also with other players in my country who used them and they applied to me to change the tip.
Sometimes if you were lucky on a bad miscue you did not get just a crack but a small piece of tip in that spot was gone).
It also happened to me in a piramid with a triangle tip on my cue.
The major difference is the price you should be ready to pay for your not so good strokes.;).
Once I started to build some cues I used my possibilities to try much more affordable layered tips available now.
I tried UltraSkins first and found them really good for the money I paid.
My recent deal was about Thoroughbred and honestly I could not be happier about both the deal and the quality of the tips I got.
When it comes to what tip is on my favorite playing shaft currently.
Well again as a cuebuilder I was curious about milk duds tips ... so I also tried to learn and make some myself because Elkmasters always were/are and I believe will always be available in my country and quite cheap.
So I made some ...put one on my playing shaft and I really enjoy playing with it.
I'm working on my first 8-pointer for myself...the shaft for it is already finished and I had put Thoroughbred medium to see the difference to my milk dud and which one I like better.
I don't expect any magic knowing what it is really about.
Good luck with your choice).
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
I was a personal friend of Sang Lee and he always used Blue Diamond tips and sometimes Elk Master but he treated them before using to get consistency..
That may be the case but he was the distributor for Moori tips and who I ordered them from. I knew Sang Lee as well but would not Know what he personally used.

I will say, due to the influence of Sang Lee Moori was what all the billiard players around where I am used.

Later he had some kind of falling out with Moori and no longer sold them.
 

Pedestrian

Registered
I have been using Le pro tips for 40 years. Is there any advantage to
the expensive layered tips?

Thanks
I had a no-name tip [$5 total] put on my $$12.95 no-name stick in 1969 at Jack & Jills, Bill Staten's [Winnie Beenies] place in Arl., Va. and would almost kill to have them both back.
Seems only these layered tips are the ones that mushroom.
 

chenjy9

Well-known member
I had a no-name tip [$5 total] put on my $$12.95 no-name stick in 1969 at Jack & Jills, Bill Staten's [Winnie Beenies] place in Arl., Va. and would almost kill to have them both back.
Seems only these layered tips are the ones that mushroom.

Soft tips also mushroom too, at least until they get properly compressed
 

middleofnowhere

Registered
I had a no-name tip [$5 total] put on my $$12.95 no-name stick in 1969 at Jack & Jills, Bill Staten's [Winnie Beenies] place in Arl., Va. and would almost kill to have them both back.
Seems only these layered tips are the ones that mushroom.
Back in the 1960s the king of all tips was the French champion.
 

dlao02

New member
I have been using Le pro tips for 40 years. Is there any advantage to
the expensive layered tips?

Thanks
In my limited and very biased experience...

I have installed 5 elk master tips onto house cues myself (very badly though), and shaped them, and played with them.

I have used 2 Kamui black tips on my cues thus far, both of them installed by a professional.

KEEPING IN MIND MY BIASED PERSPECTIVE AND CIRCUMSTANCES...
Layered tips seem to hold their shape better over time. They also seem to shape better with a shaping tool. Playability wise, they both play nicely. I used to think that elk masters are really inferior to kamui black tips in playability, but as I got better at installing and shaping tips, I have gotten my last two house cues to be as playable as my current cue with a kamui black. Especially the second to last house cue's elk master tip that I installed, I had pounded it down to a medium hardness (too spongy/soft of a tip is harder to shape in my opinion, if it is a one-piece leather tip). Friends that I play with have played with it have gotten very good draw with it and haven't miscued. I was surprised and tested it myself, and I got great draw out of it, as good of draw as I could get with my own cue.
 

Chili Palmer

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Go with 180 or even 150 if the 220 isnt cutting it. I use 150. Gives a coarser surface for the glue to grab.

I generally go for 220, and I've never had an issue, but if I have any handy I always have 180 sitting around, not sure I've ever used 150 though.
 

Riley Pitchford

New member
I started playing with a Crown tip in the 60's, but they have not been available for many years. I used a Le Pro for a few years until they changed something in the way they were made. They would mushroom and required continual maintenance. I tried putting them in a vice before I glued them on. That got rid of the mushrooming but they did not last very long. I changed to a medium Mori and never looked back. I also agree that chalk before every shot is a good habit to get into.
 

Cezar Morales

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
oh yeah and I won't touch or buy anything with the Kamui name on it........... it a prime example of entrepreneurship and I commend them for that.................... "charge more and it will be perceived as better" ?................... all Kamui products are over rated and over priced,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, $30 for a cube of chalk??? you are stupid to pay their prices
What tip n chalk do you use ?
 

Chili Palmer

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I started playing with a Crown tip in the 60's, but they have not been available for many years. I used a Le Pro for a few years until they changed something in the way they were made. They would mushroom and required continual maintenance. I tried putting them in a vice before I glued them on. That got rid of the mushrooming but they did not last very long. I changed to a medium Mori and never looked back. I also agree that chalk before every shot is a good habit to get into.

Agreed. One of my favorite questions to ask people who like to use "long lasting" chalk is - when do you chalk? I get the whole thing about some newer chalks cling better so you don't have to chalk all the time - but when do you chalk? After 2 shots? 5 shots? Or when you miscue? The function of chalking should be part of your pre-shot routine and at that point the expensive stuff simply isn't worth it. I will admit, I like the feel of Predator chalk the best (it's a bit less gritty so applying it just seems different but better - YMMV) but I don't like the octagon shape chalk. I've lost more than one piece of chalk to a bar-box pocket because I, or someone else, drops the chalk on the table and it rolls in the pocket. I also don't like spending that much on chalk when I know that Master or Silver Cup has served me well for over 30 years.

And since this is the layered tip thread I'll add more to that part. When I'm just goofing off (friends at the house, lunch with buddies at the pool hall, etc.) I tend to hit the CB pretty hard (having fun, why not) and I've always had issues with non-layered tips mushrooming so they always needed constant attention. Layered tips don't mushroom as much so it's less maintenance. I will say that Kamui's do tend to glaze over more and I generally don't catch it in time. I think that's because my old tips required so much attention they never had the chance to glaze over?

I will say I have a few Kamikaze tips installed on various cues and I like them so far but I haven't done any real world head to head tests with Kamui yet.
 

bellmagic

Registered
I have been using Le pro tips for 40 years. Is there any advantage to
the expensive layered tips?

Thanks
The newer layered tips give you better control and more english if you play and really try to control the cue ball. But, you will have to find out what tip hardness is best for you. Soft tips will generally give you more english if you use a lot, but can mushroom and lose their shape over time. A harder layered tip will hold its shape a lot better and still allow you to use english. Kamui and Morakami both make a nice line of layered tips. However, if you want to stay with a good non-layered tip, I'd switch to Triangle tips. They hold chalk well, hold their shape well, and don't tend to glaze/harden with age and cause miscues like I've seen with LePro tips.
 
Top